Categories
Book chapter

Preface

1. Which Marx?
The return to Marx following the economic crisis of 2008 has been distinct from the renewed interest in his critique of economics. Many authors, in a whole series of newspapers, journals, books and academic volumes, have observed how indispensable Marx’s analysis has proved to be for an understanding of the contradictions and destructive mechanisms of capitalism. In the last few years, however, there has also been a reconsideration of Marx as a political figure and theorist.

The publication of previously unknown manuscripts in the German MEGA2 edition, along with innovative interpretations of his work, have opened up new research horizons and demonstrated more clearly than in the past his capacity to examine the contradictions of capitalist society on a global scale and in spheres beyond the conflict between capital and labour. It is no exaggeration to say that, of the great classics of political, economic and philosophical thought, Marx is the one whose profile has changed the most in the opening decades of the twenty-first century.

As it is well known, Capital remained unfinished because of the grinding poverty in which Marx lived for two decades and because of his constant ill health connected to daily worries. But Capital was not the only project that remained incomplete. Marx’s merciless self-criticism increased the difficulties of more than one of his undertakings and the large amount of time that he spent on many projects he wanted to publish was due to the extreme rigor to which he subjected all his thinking. When Marx was young, he was known among his university friends for his meticulousness. There are stories that depict him as somebody who refused ‘to write a sentence if he was unable to prove it in ten different ways’. This is why the most prolific young scholar in the Hegelian Left still published less than many of the others. Marx’s belief that his information was insufficient, and his judgements immature, prevented him from publishing writings that remained in the form of outlines or fragments. But this is also why his notes are extremely useful and should be considered an integral part of his oeuvre. Many of his ceaseless labours had extraordinary theoretical consequences for the future.

This does not mean that his incomplete texts can be given the same weight of those that were published. One should distinguish five types of writings: published works, their preparatory manuscripts, journalistic articles, letters, and notebooks of excerpts. But distinctions must also be made within these categories. Some of Marx’s published texts should not be regarded as his final word on the issues at hand. For example, the Manifesto of the Communist Party was considered by Friedrich Engels and Marx as a historical document from their youth and not as the definitive text in which their main political conceptions were stated. Or it must be kept in mind that political propaganda writings and scientific writings are often not combinable. These kinds of errors are very frequent in the secondary literature on Marx. Not to mention the absence of the chronological dimension in many reconstructions of his thought.

The texts from the 1840s cannot be quoted indiscriminately alongside those from the 1860s and 1870s, since they do not carry equal weight of scientific knowledge and political experience. Some manuscripts were written by Marx only for himself, while others were actual preparatory materials for books to be published. Some were revised and often updated by Marx, while others were abandoned by him without the possibility of updating them (in this category there is Capital, Volume III). Some journalistic articles contain considerations that can be considered as a completion of Marx’s works. Others, however, were written quickly in order to raise money to pay the rent. Some letters include Marx’s authentic views on the issues discussed. Others contain only a softened version, because they were addressed to people outside Marx’s circle, with whom it was sometimes necessary to express himself diplomatically. Finally, there are the more than 200 notebooks containing summaries (and sometimes commentaries) of all the most important books read by Marx during the long-time span from 1838 to 1882. They are essential for an understanding of the genesis of his theory and of those elements he was unable to develop as he would have wished.

2. New Profiles of a Classic Who Has Still A Lot To Say
Recent research has refuted the various approaches that reduce Marx’s conception of communist society to superior development of the productive forces. In particular, it has shown the importance he attached to the ecological question: on repeated occasions, he denounced the fact that expansion of the capitalist mode of production increases not only the theft of workers’ labour but also the pillage of natural resources. Another question in which Marx took a close interest was migration. He showed that the forced movement of labour generated by capitalism was a major component of bourgeois exploitation and that the key to fighting this was class solidarity among workers, regardless of their origins or any distinction between local and imported labour.

Furthermore, Marx undertook thorough investigations of societies outside Europe and expressed himself unambiguously against the ravages of colonialism. These considerations are all too obvious to anyone who has read Marx, despite the skepticism nowadays fashionable in certain academic quarters.

The first and preeminent key to understand the wider variety of geographical interests in Marx’s research, during the last decade of his life, lies in his plan to provide a more ample account of the dynamics of the capitalist mode of production on a global scale. England had been the main field of observation of Capital, Volume I; after its publication, he wanted to expand the socio-economic investigations for the two volumes of Capital that remained to be written. It was for this reason that he decided to learn Russian in 1870 and was then constantly demanding books and statistics on Russia and the United States of America. He believed that the analysis of the economic transformations of these countries would have been very useful for an understanding of the possible forms in which capitalism may develop in different periods and contexts. This crucial element is underestimated in the secondary literature on the – nowadays trendy – subject ‘Marx and Eurocentrism’.

Another key question for Marx’s research into non-European societies was whether capitalism was a necessary prerequisite for the birth of communist society and at which level it had to develop internationally. The more pronounced multilinear conception, that Marx assumed in his final years, led him to look more attentively at the historical specificities and unevenness of economic and political development in different countries and social contexts. Marx became highly skeptical about the transfer of interpretive categories between completely different historical and geographical contexts and, as he wrote, also realized that ‘events of striking similarity, taking place in different historical contexts, lead to totally disparate results’. This approach certainly increased the difficulties he faced in the already bumpy course of completing the unfinished volumes of Capital and contributed to the slow acceptance that his major work would remain incomplete. But it certainly opened up new revolutionary hopes.

Marx went deeply into many other issues which, though often underestimated, or even ignored, are acquiring crucial importance for the political agenda of our times. Among these are individual freedom in the economic and political sphere, gender emancipation, the critique of nationalism, and forms of collective ownership not controlled by the state. Thus, thirty years after the fall of the Berlin wall, it has become possible to read a Marx very unlike the dogmatic, economistic and Eurocentric theorist who was paraded around for so long. One can find in Marx’s massive literary bequest several statements suggesting that the development of the productive forces is leading to dissolution of the capitalist mode of production. But it would be wrong to attribute to him any idea that the advent of socialism is a historical inevitability. Indeed, for Marx the possibility of transforming society depended on the working class and its capacity, through struggle, to bring about social upheavals that led to the birth of an alternative economic and political system.

3. Alternative to Capitalism
Across Europe, North America, and many other regions of the world, economic and political instability is now a persistent feature of contemporary social life. Globalization, financial crises, the ascendance of ecological issues, and the recent global pandemic, are just a few of the shocks and strains producing the tensions and contradictions of our time. For the first time since the end of the Cold War, there is a growing global consensus about the need to rethink the dominant organizing logic of contemporary society and develop new economic and political solutions.

In contrast to the equation of communism with dictatorship of the proletariat, which many of the real world socialisms espoused in their propaganda, it is necessary to look again at Marx’s reflections on communist society. He once defined it as ‘an association of free individuals’. If communism aims to be a higher form of society, it must promote the conditions for ‘the full and free development of every individual’.

In Capital, Marx revealed the mendacious character of bourgeois ideology. Capitalism is not an organization of society in which human beings, protected by impartial legal norms capable of guaranteeing justice and equity, enjoy true freedom and live in an accomplished democracy. In reality, they are degraded into mere objects, whose primary function is to produce commodities and profit for others.

To overturn this state of affairs, it is not enough to modify the distribution of consumption goods. What is needed is radical change at the level of the productive assets of society: ‘the producers can be free only when they are in possession of the means of production’. The socialist model that Marx had in mind did not allow for a state of general poverty but looked to the achievement of greater collective wealth and greater satisfaction of needs.

This collective volume presents a Marx in many ways different from the one familiar from the dominant currents of twentieth-century socialism. Its dual aim is to reopen for discussion, in a critical and innovative manner, the classical themes of Marx’s thought, and to develop a deeper analysis of certain questions to which relatively little attention has been paid until now. Today, of course, the Left cannot simply redefine its politics around what Marx wrote more than a century ago. But nor should it commit the error of forgetting the clarity of his analyses or fail to use the critical weapons he offered for fresh thinking about an alternative society to capitalism.

References
Enzensberger, Hans Magnus (ed.) (1973), Gespräche mit Marx und Engels, Frankfurt: Suhrkamp.
Marx, Karl (1976), Capital, Volume I, London: Penguin.
(1989), ‘Letter to Otechestvennye Zapiski’, MECW, vol. 24, pp. 196–202.
(1989), ‘Preamble to the Programme of the French Workers Party’, MECW, vol. 24, pp. 340¬–1.
Musto, Marcello (ed.) (2012), Marx for Today, New York: Routledge.
(2019), ‘Introduction: The Unfinished Critique of Capital’, in: Marcello Musto (ed.), Marx’s Capital after 150 Years: Critique and Alternative to Capitalism, London: Routledge, pp. 1–35.
(2020), ‘New Profiles of Marx After the Marx-Engels-Gesamtausgabe (MEGA²)’, Contemporary Sociology, vol. 49, n. 4: 407–19.
(2020), The Last Years of Karl Marx, 1881–1883: An Intellectual Biography, Stanford: Stanford University Press.
(ed.) (2020), The Marx Revival: Key Concepts and New Interpretations, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Saito, Kohei (2017), Karl Marx’s Ecosocialism: Capital, Nature, and the Unfinished Critique of Political Economy, New York: Monthly Review Press.

Categories
Book chapter

The Experience of the Paris Commune and Marx’s Reflections on Communism

1. The Transformation of Political Power
The bourgeois of France had always come away with everything. Since the revolution of 1789, they had been the only ones to grow rich in periods of prosperity, while the working class had regularly borne the brunt of crises. But the proclamation of the Third Republic would open new horizons and offer an opportunity for a change of course. Napoleon III, having been defeated in battle at Sedan, was taken prisoner by the Prussians on 4 September 1870. In the following January, after a four-month siege of Paris, Otto von Bismarck obtained a French surrender and was able to impose harsh terms in the ensuing armistice. National elections were held and Adolphe Thiers installed at the head of the executive power, with the support of a large Legitimist and Orleanist majority. In the capital, however, where the popular discontent was greater than elsewhere, radical republican and socialist forces swept the board. The prospect of a right-wing government that would leave social injustices intact, heaping the burden of the war on the least well-off and seeking to disarm the city, triggered a new revolution on 18 March. Thiers and his army had little choice but to decamp to Versailles.
To secure democratic legitimacy, the insurgents decided to hold free elections at once. On 26 March, an overwhelming majority of Parisians (190,000 votes against 40,000) approved the motivation for the revolt, and 70 of the 85 elected representatives declared their support for the revolution. The 15 moderate representatives of the parti des maires, a group comprising the former heads of certain arrondissements, immediately resigned and did not participate in the council of the Commune; they were joined shortly afterwards by four Radicals. The remaining 66 members – not always easy to distinguish because of dual political affiliations – represented a wide range of positions. Among them were twenty or so neo-Jacobin republicans (including the renowned Charles Delescluze and Félix Pyat), a dozen followers of Auguste Blanqui, 17 members of the International Working Men’s Association (both mutualist partisans of Pierre-Joseph Proudhon and collectivists linked to Karl Marx, often at odds with each other), and a couple of independents. Most leaders of the Commune were workers or recognized representatives of the working class, 14 originating in the National Guard. In fact, it was the central committee of the latter that invested power in the hands of the Commune – the prelude, as it turned out, to a long series of disagreements and conflicts between the two bodies.
On 28 March a large number of citizens gathered in the vicinity of the Hôtel de Ville for festivities celebrating the new assembly, which now officially took the name of the Paris Commune. Although it would survive for no more than 72 days, it was the most important political event in the history of the nineteenth-century workers’ movement, rekindling hope among a population exhausted by months of hardship. Committees and groups sprang up in the popular quarters to lend support to the Commune, and every corner of the metropolis hosted initiatives to express solidarity and to plan the construction of a new world. One of the most widespread sentiments was a desire to share with others. Militants like Louise Michel exemplified the spirit of self-abnegation – Victor Hugo wrote of her that she ‘did what the great mad souls do […] glorified those who are crushed and downtrodden’. But it was not the impetus of a leader or a handful of charismatic figures that gave life to the Commune; its hallmark was its clearly collective dimension. Women and men came together voluntarily to pursue a common project of liberation. Self-government was not seen as a utopia. Self-emancipation was thought of as the essential task.
Two of the first emergency decrees to stem the rampant poverty were a freeze on rent payments and on the selling of items valued below 20 francs in pawn shops. Nine collegial commissions were also supposed to replace the ministries for war, finance, general security, education, subsistence, labour and trade, foreign relations and public service. A little later, a delegate was appointed to head each of these departments.
On 19 April, three days after further elections to fill 31 seats that became almost immediately vacant, the Commune adopted a Declaration to the French People that contained an ‘absolute guarantee of individual liberty, of liberty of conscience, and liberty of labour’ as well as ‘the permanent intervention of citizens in communal affairs’. The conflict between Paris and Versailles, it affirmed, ‘cannot be ended by illusory compromises’; the people had a right and ‘duty to struggle and to conquer!’. Even more significant than this text – a somewhat ambiguous synthesis to avoid tensions among the various political tendencies – were the concrete actions through which the Communards fought for a total transformation of political power. A set of reforms addressed not only the modalities but the very nature of political administration. The Commune provided for the recall of elected representatives and for control over their actions by means of binding mandates (though this was by no means enough to settle the complex issue of political representation). Magistracies and other public offices, also subject to permanent control and possible recall, were not to be arbitrarily assigned, as in the past, but to be decided following an open contest or elections. The clear aim was to prevent the public sphere from becoming the domain of professional politicians. Policy decisions were not left up to small groups of functionaries and technicians, but had to be taken by the people. Armies and police forces would no longer be institutions set apart from the body of society. The separation between state and church was also a sine qua non.
But the vision of political change was not confined to such measures: it went more deeply to the roots. The transfer of power into the hands of the people was needed to drastically reduce bureaucracy. The social sphere should take precedence over the political – as Henri de Saint-Simon had already maintained – so that politics would no longer be a specialized function but become progressively integrated into the activity of civil society. The social body would thus take back functions that had been transferred to the state. To overthrow the existing system of class rule was not sufficient; there had to be an end to class rule as such. All this would have fulfilled the Commune’s vision of the republic as a union of free, truly democratic associations promoting the emancipation of all its components. It would have added up to self-government of the producers.

2. The Commune as Synonym of Revolution and Social Reforms
The Commune held that social reforms were even more crucial than political change. They were the reason for its existence, the barometer of its loyalty to its founding principles, and the key element differentiating it from the previous revolutions in 1789 and 1848. The Commune passed more than one measure with clear class connotations. Deadlines for debt repayments were postponed by three years, without additional interest charges. Evictions for non-payment of rent were suspended, and a decree allowed vacant accommodation to be requisitioned for people without a roof over their heads. There were plans to shorten the working day (from the initial 10 hours to the eight hours envisaged for the future), the widespread practice of imposing specious fines on workers simply as a wage-cutting measure was outlawed on pain of sanctions, and minimum wages were set at a respectable level. As much as possible was done to increase food supplies and to lower prices. Nightwork at bakeries was banned, and a number of municipal meat stores were opened. Social assistance of various kinds was extended to weaker sections of the population – for example, food banks for abandoned women and children – and discussions were held on how to end the discrimination between legitimate and illegitimate children.
All the Communards sincerely believed that education was an essential factor for individual emancipation and any serious social and political change. School attendance was to become free and compulsory for girls and boys alike, with religiously inspired instruction giving way to secular teaching along rational, scientific lines. Specially appointed commissions and the pages of the press featured many compelling arguments for investment in female education. To become a genuine ‘public service’, education had to offer equal opportunities to ‘children of both sexes’. Moreover, ‘distinctions on grounds of race, nationality, religion or social position’ should be prohibited. Early practical initiatives accompanied such advances in theory, and in more than one arrondissement thousands of working-class children entered school buildings for the first time and received classroom material free of charge.
The Commune also adopted measures of a socialist character. It decreed that workshops abandoned by employers who had fled the city, with guarantees of compensation on their return, should be handed over to cooperative associations of workers. Theatres and museums – open for all without charge – were collectivized and placed under the management of the Federation of Parisian Artists, which was presided over by the painter and tireless militant Gustave Courbet. Some three hundred sculptors, architects, lithographers and painters (among them Édouard Manet) participated in this body – an example taken up in the founding of an Artists’ Federation bringing together actors and people from the operatic world.
All these actions and provisions were introduced in the amazing space of just 54 days, in a Paris still reeling from the effects of the Franco-Prussian War. The Commune was able to do its work only between 29 March and 21 May, in the midst of heroic resistance to attacks by the Versaillais that also required a great expenditure of human energy and financial resources. Since the Commune had no means of coercion at its disposal, many of its decrees were not applied uniformly in the vast area of the city. Yet they displayed a remarkable drive to reshape society and pointed the way to possible change.
The Commune was much more than the actions approved by its legislative assembly. It even aspired to redraw urban space, as demonstrated by the decision to demolish the Vendôme Column, considered a monument to barbarism and a reprehensible symbol of war, and to secularize certain places of worship by handing them over for use by the community. If the Commune managed to keep going, it was thanks to an extraordinary level of mass participation and a solid spirit of mutual assistance. In this spurning of authority, the revolutionary clubs that sprang up in nearly every arrondissement played a noteworthy role. There were at least 28 of them, representing one of the most eloquent examples of spontaneous mobilization. Open every evening, they offered citizens the opportunity to meet after work to discuss freely the social and political situation, to check what their representatives had achieved, and to suggest alternative ways of solving day-to-day problems. They were horizontal associations, which favoured the formation and expression of popular sovereignty as well as the creation of genuine spaces of sisterhood and fraternity, where everyone could breathe the intoxicating air of control over their own destiny.
This emancipatory trajectory had no place for national discrimination. Citizenship of the Commune extended to all who strove for its development, and foreigners enjoyed the same social rights as French people. The principle of equality was evident in the prominent role played by the 3,000 foreigners active in the Commune. Leo Frankel, a Hungarian member of the International Working Men’s Association, was not only elected to the Council of the Commune but served as its ‘minister’ of labour – one of its key positions. Similarly, the Poles Jaroslaw Dombrowski and Walery Wroblewski were distinguished generals at the head of the National Guard.
Women, though still without the right to vote or to sit on the council of the Commune, played an essential role in the critique of the social order. In many cases, they transgressed the norms of bourgeois society and asserted a new identity in opposition to the values of the patriarchal family, moving beyond domestic privacy to engage with the public sphere. The Women’s Union for the Defence of Paris and Care for the Wounded, whose origin owed a great deal to the tireless activity of the First International member Elisabeth Dmitrieff, was centrally involved in identifying strategic social battles. Women achieved the closure of licensed brothels, won parity for female and male teachers, coined the slogan ‘equal pay for equal work’, demanded equal rights within marriage and the recognition of free unions, and promoted exclusively female chambers in labour unions. When the military situation worsened in mid-May, with the Versaillais at the gates of Paris, women took up arms and formed a battalion of their own. Many would breathe their last on the barricades. Bourgeois propaganda subjected them to the most vicious attacks, dubbing them les pétroleuses and accusing them of having set the city ablaze during the street battles.
The genuine democracy that the Communards sought to establish was an ambitious and difficult project. Popular sovereignty required the participation of the greatest possible number of citizens. From late March on, Paris witnessed the mushrooming of central commissions, local subcommittees, revolutionary clubs and soldiers’ battalions, which flanked the already complex duopoly of the Council of the Commune and the central committee of the National Guard. The latter had retained military control, often acting as a veritable counter-power to the Council. Although direct involvement of the population was a vital guarantee of democracy, the multiple authorities in play made the decision-making process particularly difficult and meant that the implementation of decrees was a tortuous affair.
The problem of the relationship between central authority and local bodies led to quite a few chaotic, at times paralysing, situations. The delicate balance broke down altogether when, faced with the war emergency, indiscipline within the National Guard and the growing inefficacy of government, Jules Miot proposed the creation of a five-person Committee of Public Safety, along the lines of Maximilien Robespierre’s dictatorial model in 1793. The measure was approved on the first of May, by a majority of 45 to 23. It proved to be a dramatic error, which marked the beginning of the end for a novel political experiment and split the Commune into two opposing blocs. The first of these, made up of neo-Jacobins and Blanquists, leaned towards the concentration of power and, in the end, to the primacy of the political over the social dimension. The second, including a majority of members of the International Working Men’s Association, regarded the social sphere as more significant than the political. They thought that a separation of powers was necessary and insisted that the republic must never call political freedoms into question. Coordinated by Eugène Varlin, this latter bloc sharply rejected the authoritarian drift and did not take part in the elections to the Committee of Public Safety. In its view, the centralization of powers in the hands of a few individuals would flatly contradict the founding postulates of the Commune, since its elected representatives did not possess sovereignty – that belonged to the people – and had no right to cede it to a particular body. On 21 May, when the minority again took part in a session of the Council of the Commune, a new attempt was made to weave unity in its ranks. But it was already too late.
The Paris Commune was brutally crushed by the armies of Versailles. During the Semaine sanglante, the week of blood-letting between 21 and 28 May, a total of 17,000 to 25,000 citizens were slaughtered. The last hostilities took place along the walls of Père Lachaise cemetery. It was one of the bloodiest massacre in the history of France. Only 6,000 managed to escape into exile in England, Belgium and Switzerland. The number of prisoners taken was 43,522. One hundred of these received death sentences, following summary trials before courts martial, and another 13,500 were sent to prison or forced labour, or deported to remote areas such as New Caledonia.
The spectre of the Commune intensified the anti-socialist repression all over Europe. Passing over the unprecedented violence of the Thiers state, the conservative and liberal press accused the Communards of the worst crimes and expressed great relief at the restoration of the ‘natural order’ and bourgeois legality, as well as satisfaction with the triumph of ‘civilization’ over anarchy. Those who had dared to violate the authority and attack the privileges of the ruling class were punished in exemplary fashion. Women were once again treated as inferior beings, and workers, with dirty, calloused hands who had brazenly presumed to govern, were driven back into positions for which they were deemed more suitable.
And yet, the insurrection in Paris gave strength to workers’ struggles and pushed them in more radical directions. The Commune had shown that the aim had to be one of building a society radically different from capitalism and embodied the idea of social-political change and its practical application. It became synonymous with the very concept of revolution, with an ontological experience of the working class.

3. The International After the Paris Commune
Although Mikhail Bakunin had urged the workers to turn patriotic war into revolutionary war, the General Council of the International Working Men’s Association in London initially opted for silence. It charged Karl Marx with the task of writing a text in the name of the International, but he delayed its publication for complicated, deeply held reasons. Well aware of the real relationship of forces on the ground as well as the weaknesses of the Commune, he knew that it was doomed to defeat. He had even tried to warn the French working class back in September 1870, in his Second Address on the Franco–Prussian War:
Any attempt at upsetting the new government in the present crisis, when the enemy is almost knocking at the doors of Paris, would be a desperate folly. The French workmen […] must not allow themselves to be swayed by the national souvenirs of 1792 […]. They have not to recapitulate the past, but to build up the future. Let them calmly and resolutely improve the opportunities of republican liberty, for the work of their own class organization. It will gift them with fresh herculean powers for the regeneration of France, and our common task – the emancipation of labour. Upon their energies and wisdom hinges the fate of the republic.
A fervid declaration hailing the victory of the Commune would have risked creating false expectations among workers throughout Europe, eventually becoming a source of demoralization and distrust. Marx therefore decided to postpone delivery and stayed away from meetings of the General Council for several weeks. His grim forebodings soon proved all too well founded, and on 28 May, little more than two months after its proclamation, the Paris Commune was drowned in blood. Two days later, he reappeared at the General Council with a manuscript entitled The Civil War in France. It was read and unanimously approved, then published over the names of all the Council members. The document had a huge impact over the next few weeks, greater than any other document of the workers’ movement in the nineteenth century. Three English editions in quick succession won acclaim among the workers and caused uproar in bourgeois circles. It was also translated fully or partly into a dozen other languages, appearing in newspapers, magazines and booklets in various European countries and the United States.
Despite Marx’s passionate defense, and despite the claims both of reactionary opponents and of dogmatic Marxists eager to glorify the International, it is out of the question that the General Council actually pushed for the Parisian insurrection. Marx himself pointed out that ‘the majority of the Commune was in no sense socialist, nor could it have been’.
After the defeat of the Paris Commune, the International was at the eye of the storm, held to blame for every act against the established order. ‘When the great conflagration took place at Chicago’, Marx mused with bitter irony, ‘the telegraph round the world announced it as the infernal deed of the International; and it is really wonderful that to its demoniacal agency has not been attributed the hurricane ravaging the West Indies’.
Marx had to spend whole days answering press slanders about the International and himself: ‘at this moment’, he wrote, [he was] ‘the best calumniated and the most menaced man of London’. Meanwhile, governments all over Europe sharpened their instruments of repression, fearing that other uprisings might follow the one in Paris. Thiers immediately outlawed the International and asked the British prime minister, William Ewart Gladstone, to follow his example; it was the first diplomatic exchange relating to a workers’ organization. Pope Pius IX exerted similar pressure on the Swiss government, arguing that it would a serious mistake to continue tolerating ‘that International sect which would like to treat the whole of Europe as it treated Paris. Those gentlemen […] are to be feared, because they work on behalf of the eternal enemies of God and mankind’. Giuseppe Mazzini – who for a time had looked to the International with hope – had similar views and considered that principles of the International had become those of ‘denial of God, […] the fatherland, […] and all individual property’.
Criticism of the Paris Commune even spread to sections of the workers’ movement. Following the publication of The Civil War in France, both the trade union leader George Odger and the old Chartist Benjamin Lucraft resigned from the International, bending under the pressure of the hostile press campaign. However, no trade union withdrew its support for the organization – which suggests once again that the failure of the International to grow in Britain was due mainly to political apathy in the working class.
Despite the bloody denouement in Paris and the wave of calumny and government repression elsewhere in Europe, the International grew stronger and more widely known in the wake of the Commune. For the capitalists and the middle classes it represented a threat to the established order, but for the workers it fuelled hopes in a world without exploitation and injustice. Insurrectionary Paris fortified the workers’ movement, impelling it to adopt more radical positions and to intensify its militancy. The experience showed that revolution was possible, that the goal could and should be to build a society utterly different from the capitalist order, but also that, in order to achieve this, the workers would have to create durable and well-organized forms of political association.
This enormous vitality was apparent everywhere. Newspapers linked to the International – such as L’Égalité in Geneva, Der Volksstaat in Leipzig, La Emancipación in Madrid, Il Gazzettino Rosa in Milan, Socialisten in Copenhagen, and La Réforme Sociale in Rouen – increased in both number and overall sales. Finally, and most significantly, the International continued to expand in Belgium and Spain – where the level of workers’ involvement had already been considerable before the Paris Commune –, opened new sections in Portugal and Denmark, and experienced a real breakthrough in Italy. Many Mazzinians, disappointed with the positions taken by their erstwhile leader, joined forces with the organization and Giuseppe Garibaldi, although he had only a vague idea of the International, declared: ‘The International is the sun of the future!’.

4. The Civil War in France and Marx’s Reflections on Communism
In a letter to Wilhelm Liebknecht, Marx complained of ‘too great honesty’ of the Parisian revolutionaries. In trying to avoid ‘the appearance of having usurped power’, they had ‘lost precious moments’ by organizing the election of the Commune. Their ‘folly’ had been ‘not wanting to start a civil war – as if Thiers had not already started it by his attempt at forcibly disarming Paris’. He made similar points to his friend Ludwig Kugelmann a week later: ‘The right moment was missed because of conscientious scruples […] Second mistake: The Central Committee surrendered power too soon, to make way for the Commune. Again from a too honourable scrupulousness’.
At any event, alongside critical observations on the course of events in France, Marx never failed to highlight the exceptional combative spirit and political ability of the Communards. He continued:
What resilience, what historical initiative, what a capacity for sacrifice in these Parisians! After six months of hunger and ruin, caused rather by internal treachery than by the external enemy, they rise, beneath Prussian bayonets, as if there had never been a war between France and Germany and the enemy were not still at the gates of Paris! History has no like example of a like greatness.
Marx understood that, whatever the outcome of the revolution, the Commune had opened a new chapter in the history of the workers’ movement:
The present rising in Paris – even if it be crushed by the wolves, swine and vile curs of the old society – is the most glorious deed of our Party since the June Insurrection in Paris. Compare these Parisians, storming the heavens, with the slaves to heaven of the German-Prussian Holy Roman Empire, with its posthumous masquerades reeking of the barracks, the Church, the cabbage Junkers and above all, of the philistines.
Marx continued these reflections a few days later in another letter to Kugelmann. Whereas his close friend had wrongly compared the fighting in Paris to ‘petty-bourgeois demonstrations’ like those of 13 June 1849 in Paris, Marx again exalted the courage of the Communards: ‘World history’, he wrote, ‘would indeed be very easy to make if the struggle were taken up only on condition of infallibly favourable chances’. His thinking here shows just how remote he was from the kind of fatalist determinism that his critics attributed to him:
[History] would, on the other hand, be of a very mystical nature if ‘accidents’ played no part. These accidents themselves fall naturally into the general course of development and are compensated again by other accidents. But acceleration and delay are very dependent upon such ‘accidents’, which include the ‘accident’ of the character of those who first stand at the head of the movement.
The circumstance that worked against the Commune was the presence of the Prussians on French soil, allied with the ‘bourgeois riff-raff of Versailles’. Bolstered by their understanding with the Germans, the Versaillais ‘presented the Parisians with the alternative of taking up the fight or succumbing without a struggle’. In the latter case, ‘the demoralization of the working class would have been a far greater misfortune than the fall of any number of “leaders”’. Marx concluded: ‘The struggle of the working class against the capitalist class and its state has entered upon a new phase with the struggle in Paris. Whatever the immediate results may be, a new point of departure of world-historic importance has been gained’.
A fervid declaration hailing the victory of the Paris Commune would have risked creating false expectations among workers throughout Europe, eventually becoming a source of demoralization and distrust. Marx therefore decided to postpone delivery and stayed away from meetings of the General Council for several weeks. His grim forebodings soon proved all too well founded, and on 28 May, little more than two months after its proclamation, the Paris Commune was drowned in blood. Two days later, he reappeared at the General Council with a manuscript entitled The Civil War in France. It was read and unanimously approved, then published over the names of all the Council members.
The document had a huge impact over the next few weeks, greater than any other document of the workers’ movement in the 19th century. Speaking of the Paris Commune, Marx wrote:
The few but important functions which would still remain for a central government were not to be suppressed, as has been intentionally misstated, but were to be discharged by Communal and thereafter responsible agents. The unity of the nation was not to be broken, but, on the contrary, to be organized by Communal Constitution, and to become a reality by the destruction of the state power which claimed to be the embodiment of that unity independent of, and superior to, the nation itself, from which it was but a parasitic excresence. While the merely repressive organs of the old governmental power were to be amputated, its legitimate functions were to be wrested from an authority usurping pre-eminence over society itself, and restored to the responsible agents of society.
The Paris Commune had been an altogether novel political experiment:
It was essentially a working-class government, the product of the struggle of the producing against the appropriating class, the political form at last discovered under which to work out the economical emancipation of labour. Except on this last condition, the Communal Constitution would have been an impossibility and a delusion. The political rule of the producer cannot coexist with the perpetuation of his social slavery. The Commune was therefore to serve as a lever for uprooting the economical foundation upon which rests the existence of classes, and therefore of class rule. With labour emancipated, every man becomes a working man, and productive labour ceases to be a class attribute.
For Marx, the new phase of class struggle that opened with the Paris Commune could be successful – and therefore produce radical changes – only through the realization of a clearly anticapitalist programme:
the Commune intended to abolish […] class property which makes the labour of the many the wealth of the few. It aimed at the expropriation of the expropriators. It wanted to make individual property a truth by transforming the means of production, land, and capital, now chiefly the means of enslaving and exploiting labour, into mere instruments of free and associated labour. […] If co-operative production is not to remain a sham and a snare; if it is to supersede the capitalist system; if united co-operative societies are to regulate national production upon common plan, thus taking it under their own control, and putting an end to the constant anarchy and periodical convulsions which are the fatality of capitalist production – what else, gentlemen, would it be but communism, ‘possible’ communism? The working class did not expect miracles from the Commune. They have no ready-made utopias to introduce by decree of the people. They know that in order to work out their own emancipation, and along with it that higher form to which present society is irresistibly tending by its own economical agencies, they will have to pass through long struggles, through a series of historic processes, transforming circumstances and men. They have no ideals to realize, but to set free the elements of the new society with which old collapsing bourgeois society itself is pregnant.
In communist society, along with transformative changes in the economy, the role of the state and the function of politics would also have to be redefined. In The Civil War in France, Marx was at pains to explain that, after the conquest of power, the working class would have to fight to ‘uproot the economical foundations upon which rests the existence of classes, and therefore of class rule’. Once ‘labour was emancipated, every man would become a working man, and productive labour [would] cease to be a class attribute’. The well-known statement that ‘the working class cannot simply lay hold of the ready-made state machinery and wield it for its own purposes’ was meant to signify, as Marx and Engels clarified in the booklet Fictitious Splits in the International, that ‘the functions of government [should] become simple administrative functions’. And in a concise formulation in his Conspectus on Bakunin’s Statism and Anarchy, Marx insisted that ‘the distribution of general functions [should] become a routine matter which entails no domination’. This would, as far as possible, avoid the danger that the exercise of political duties generated new dynamics of domination and subjugation.
Marx believed that, with the development of modern society, ‘state power [had] assumed more and more the character of the national power of capital over labour, of a public force organized for social enslavement, of an engine of class despotism’. In communism, by contrast, the workers would have to prevent the state from becoming an obstacle to full emancipation. It would be necessary to ‘amputate’ ‘the merely repressive organs of the old governmental power, [to wrest] its legitimate functions from an authority usurping pre-eminence over society itself, and restore [them] to the responsible agents of society’. In the Critique of the Gotha Programme, Marx observed that ‘freedom consists in converting the state from an organ superimposed upon society into one completely subordinate to it’, and shrewdly added that ‘forms of state are more free or less free to the extent that they restrict the ‘freedom of the state’’.
In the same text, Marx underlined the demand that, in communist society, public policies should prioritize the ‘collective satisfaction of needs’. Spending on schools, healthcare and other common goods would ‘grow considerably in comparison with present-day society and grow in proportion as the new society develop[ed]’. Education would assume front-rank importance and – as he had pointed out in The Civil War in France, referring to the model adopted by the Communards in 1871 – ‘all the educational institutions [would be] opened to the people gratuitously and […] cleared of all interference of Church and State’. Only in this way would culture be ‘made accessible to all’ and ‘science itself freed from the fetters which class prejudice and governmental force had imposed upon it’.
Unlike liberal society, where ‘equal right’ leaves existing inequalities intact, in communist society ‘right would have to be unequal rather than equal’. A change in this direction would recognize, and protect, individuals on the basis of their specific needs and the greater or lesser hardship of their conditions, since ‘they would not be different individuals if they were not unequal’. Furthermore, it would be possible to determine each person’s fair share of services and the available wealth. The society that aimed to follow the principle ‘From each according to their abilities, to each according to their needs’ had before it this intricate road fraught with difficulties. However, the final outcome was not guaranteed by some ‘magnificent progressive destiny’ (in the words of Leopardi), nor was it irreversible.
Marx attached a fundamental value to individual freedom, and his communism was radically different from the levelling of classes envisaged by his various predecessors or pursued by many of his epigones. In the Urtext, however, he pointed to the ‘folly of those socialists (especially French socialists)’ who, considering ‘socialism to be the realization of [bourgeois] ideas, […] purport[ed] to demonstrate that exchange and exchange value, etc., were originally […] a system of the freedom and equality of all, but [later] perverted by money [and] capital’. In the Grundrisse, he labelled it an ‘absurdity’ to regard ‘free competition as the ultimate development of human freedom’; it was tantamount to a belief that ‘the rule of the bourgeoisie is the terminal point of world history’, which he mockingly described as ‘an agreeable thought for the parvenus of the day before yesterday’.
In the same way, Marx contested the liberal ideology according to which ‘the negation of free competition [was] equivalent to the negation of individual freedom and of social production based upon individual freedom’. In bourgeois society, the only possible ‘free development’ was ‘on the limited basis of the domination of capital’. But that ‘type of individual freedom’ was, at the same time, ‘the most sweeping abolition of all individual freedom and the complete subjugation of individuality to social conditions which assume the form of objective powers, indeed of overpowering objects […] independent of the individuals relating to one another’.
The alternative to capitalist alienation was achievable only if the subaltern classes became aware of their condition as new slaves and embarked on a struggle to radically transform the world in which they were exploited. Their mobilization and active participation in this process could not stop, however, on the day after the conquest of power. The Paris Commune had been a remarkable revolutionary example to follow. Social mobilization would have to continue after the revolution, in order to avert any drift toward the kind of state socialism that Marx always opposed with the utmost tenacity and conviction.
In 1868, in a significant letter to the president of the General Association of German Workers, Marx explained that in Germany, ‘where the worker is regulated bureaucratically from childhood onwards, where he believes in authority, in those set over him, the main thing is to teach him to walk by himself’. He never changed this conviction throughout his life and it is not by chance that the first point of his draft of the Statutes of the International Working Men’s Association states: ‘The emancipation of the working classes must be conquered by the working classes themselves’. And they add immediately afterwards that the struggle for working-class emancipation ‘means not a struggle for class privileges and monopolies, but for equal rights and duties’.

 

References
[1] This work was supported by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), Insight Development Grant (Project n. 430-2020-00985).
[2] On the main events leading up to the revolution, see Maurice Choury, Les origenes de la Commune (Paris: Éditions sociales, 1960); Alain Dalotel, Alain Faure, and Jean-Claude Freiermuth, Aux origines de la Commune. Le movement des reunions publiques à Paris, 1868–1870 (Paris: Maspero, 1980); and Pierre Milza, L’année terrible. I: La guerre franco–prussienne (septembre 1870-mars 1871) (Paris: Perrin, 2009).
[3] See Jacques Rougerie, Paris libre 1871 (Paris: Seuil, 1971), p. 146; Pierre Milza, L’année terrible. II: La Commune (Paris: Perrin, 2009), pp. 236–44; and also the more recent Claude Latta, ‘Minorité et majorité au sein de la Commune (avril-mai 1871)’, in: Michel Cordillot (ed.), La Commune de Paris 1871. Les acteurs, l’événement, les lieux (Ivry-sur-Seine: Les Éditions de l’Atelier/Éditions Ouvrières, 2021).
[4] Victor Hugo, ‘Viro Major’, in: Nic Maclellan (ed.), Louise Michel (New York: Ocean Press, 2004), p. 24.
[5] Jacques Rougerie, La Commune de 1871 (Presses Universitaires de France, 1988), pp. 62–3.
[6] The Commune of Paris, ‘Declaration to the French People’, in: Robert Tombs, The Paris Commune 1871 (London: Longman, 1999), pp. 218–9.
[7] See Rougerie, Paris libre 1871, p. 100.
[8] Cited in Hugues Lenoir, ‘La Commune de Paris et l’éducation’, in: Cordillot (ed.), La Commune de Paris 1871, pp. 495-8.
[9] See Gonzalo J. Sanchez, Organizing Independence: The Artists Federation of the Paris Commune and its Legacy, 1871–1889 (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1997); and Hollis Clayson, Paris in Despair: Art and Everyday Life under Siege (1870–1871) (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002).
[10] For a list of the 28 clubs that existed at the time of the Paris Commune see Martin Philip Johnson, The Paradise of Association: Political Culture and Popular Organizations in the Paris Commune of 1871 (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996), pp. 166–70.
[11] See Edith Thomas, Les «Pétroleuses» (Paris: Gallimard, 1963); and Alain Dalotel, ‘La barricade des femmes, 1871’, in: Alain Corbin and Jean-Marie Mayeur (eds.), La barricade (Paris: Éditions la Sorbonne, 1997), pp. 341–55.
[12] References on this topic include the classic study of Georges Bourgin, ‘La Commune de Paris et le Comité central (1871)’, Revue historique, vol. 1925, n. 150: 1–66; and the recent Pierre-Henri Zaidman, ‘Le Comité central contre la Commune?’, in: Cordillot, La Commune de Paris 1871, pp. 229–36.
[13] Some who went there solidarized with and shared the fate of the Algerian leaders of the anticolonial Mokrani revolt, which had broken out at the same time as the Commune and also been drowned in blood by French troops.
[14] On the morrow of its defeat, Eugène Pottier wrote what was destined to become the most celebrated anthem of the workers’ movement: ‘Let us group together and tomorrow / The Internationale / Will be the human race!’.
[15] Cf. Henri Lefebvre, La proclamation de la Commune, 26 mars 1871 (Paris: La fabrique éditions, 2018), p. 355.
[16] See Arthur Lehning, ‘Introduction’, in: Idem. (ed.), Bakunin – Archiv, vol. VI: Michel Bakounine sur la Guerre Franco–Allemande et la Révolution Sociale en France (1870–1871) (Leiden: Brill, 1977), p. xvi.
[17] See Marcello Musto, ‘Introduction’, in: Marcello Musto (ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (New York: Bloomsbury, 2014), pp. 30–6.
[18] Karl Marx, Second Address of the General Council of the International Working Men’s Association on the Franco–Prussian War, MECW, vol. 22, p. 269.
[19] See Georges Haupt, Aspect of International Socialism 1871–1914 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986), who warned against ‘the reshaping of the reality of the Commune in order to make it conform to an image transfigured by ideology’, p. 25.
[20] Karl Marx to Domela Nieuwenhuis, 22 February 1881, MECW, vol. 46, p. 66.
[21] Karl Marx, Report of the General Council to the Fifth Annual Congress of the International, in: Institute of Marxism-Leninism of the C.C., C.P.S.U. (ed.), The General Council of the First International 1871–1872: Minutes (Moscow: Progress, 1986), p. 461.
[22] Karl Marx to Ludwig Kugelmann, 18 June 1871, MECW, vol. 44, p. 157.
[23] Institute of Marxism-Leninism (ed.), The General Council of the First International 1871–1872, p. 460.
[24] Giuseppe Mazzini, L’Internazionale, in: Gian Mario Bravo (ed.), La Prima Internazionale: Storia documentaria, vol. II (Roma: Editori Riuniti, 1978), pp. 499–501.
[25] Henry Collins and Chimen Abramsky, Karl Marx and the British Labour Movement (London: MacMillan, 1965), p. 222.
[26] See Georges Haupt, L’Internazionale socialista dalla Comune a Lenin (Torino: Einaudi, 1978), p. 28.
[27] Ibid., pp. 93–5.
[28] See Nello Rosselli, Mazzini e Bakunin (Torino: Einaudi, 1927), pp. 323–4.
[29] Giuseppe Garibaldi to Giorgio Pallavicino, 14 November 1871, in: Enrico Emilio Ximenes, Epistolario di Giuseppe Garibaldi, vol. I (Milano: Brigola 1885), p. 350.
[30] Karl Marx to Wilhelm Liebknecht, 6 April 1871, MECW, vol. 44, p. 193.
[31] Marx is referring to the workers’ uprising of June 1848, which was drowned in blood by a conservative republican government.
[32] Karl Marx to Ludwig Kugelmann, 12 April 1871, MECW, vol. 44, pp. 131–2.
[33] Karl Marx to Ludwig Kugelmann, 17 April 1871, MECW, vol. 44, pp. 136–7.
[34] See Karl Marx to Léo Frankel and Louis-Eugène Varlin (draft), 13 May 1871, MECW, vol. 44, p. 149: ‘The Prussians won’t hand over the forts to the Versailles people, but after the definitive conclusion of peace (26 May), they will allow the government to invest Paris with its gendarmes. […] Thiers & Co. had […] asked Bismarck to delay payment of the first instalment until the occupation of Paris. Bismarck accepted this condition. Prussia, being herself in urgent need of that money, will therefore provide the Versailles people with every possible facility to hasten the occupation of Paris. So be on your guard!’.
[35] Karl Marx to Ludwig Kugelmann, 17 April 1871, MECW, vol. 44, p. 137.
[36] See Marcello Musto, Another Marx: Early Manuscripts to the International (London: Bloomsbury, 2018), pp. 199-220.
[37] Three English editions of The Civil War in France in quick succession won acclaim among the workers and caused uproar in bourgeois circles. It was also translated fully or partly into a dozen other languages, appearing in newspapers, magazines and booklets in various European countries and the United States.
[38] Karl Marx, ‘On the Paris Commune’, in: Musto, Workers Unite!, pp. 215–6.
[39] Ibid., pp. 217–8.
[40] Ibid., pp. 218–9.
[41] Karl Marx, The Civil War in France, MECW, vol. 22, pp. 334–5.
[42] Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, ‘Fictitious Splits in the International’, MECW, vol. 23, p. 121.
[43] Marx, ‘Notes on Bakunin’s Book Statehood and Anarchy’, MECW, vol. 24 p. 519.
[44] Marx, The Civil War in France, p. 329.
[45] Ibid., pp. 332–3.
[46] Marx, Critique of the Gotha Programme, MECW, vol. 24, p. 94.
[47] Ibid., p. 85.
[48] Marx, The Civil War in France, p. 332.
[49] Marx, Critique of the Gotha Programme, p. 87.
[50] See Marcello Musto, ‘Communism’, in: Marcello Musto (ed.), The Marx Revival: Key Concepts and New Interpretations(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020), pp. 24–50.
[51] Karl Marx, Economic Manuscripts of 1857–58, MECW, vol. 28, p. 180.
[52] Karl Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy (Rough Draft of 1857–58) [Second Instalment]’, MECW, vol. 29, p. 40.
1857-58) [Second Instalment]’
[53] Ibid.
[54] Karl Marx to J. B. von Schweitzer, 13 October 1868, MECW, vol. 43, p. 134.
[55] Karl Marx, ‘Provisional Rules of the Association’, MECW, vol. 20, p. 14.

 

Bibliography
Bourgin, Georges (1925), ‘La Commune de Paris et le Comité central (1871)’, Revue historique, vol. 1925, n. 150: 1–66.
Choury, Maurice (1960), Les origenes de la Commune, Paris: Éditions sociales.
Clayson, Hollis (2002), Paris in Despair: Art and Everyday Life under Siege (1870–1871), Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Collins, Henry, and Abramsky, Chimen (1965), Karl Marx and the British Labour Movement, London: MacMillan.
The Commune of Paris (1999), ‘Declaration to the French People’, in: Robert Tombs, The Paris Commune 1871, London: Longman, pp. 217–19.
Dalotel, Alain (1997), ‘La barricade des femmes, 1871’, in: Alain Corbin and Jean-Marie Mayeur (eds.), La barricade, Paris: Éditions la Sorbonne, pp. 341–55.
Dalotel, Alain, Faure, Alain, and Freiermuth, Jean-Claude (1980), Aux origines de la Commune. Le movement des reunions publiques à Paris, 1868–1870, Paris: Maspero.
Haupt, Georges (1978), L’Internazionale socialista dalla Comune a Lenin, Torino: Einaudi.
(1986), Aspect of International Socialism 1871–1914, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Hugo, Victor (2004), ‘Viro Major’, in: Nic Maclellan (ed.), Louise Michel, New York: Ocean Press, pp. 24–5.
Institute of Marxism-Leninism of the C.C., C.P.S.U. (ed.) (1968), The General Council of the First International 1871–1872: Minutes, Moscow: Progress.
Johnson, Martin Philip (1996), The Paradise of Association: Political Culture and Popular Organizations in the Paris Commune of 1871, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.
Latta, Claude (2021), ‘Minorité et majorité au sein de la Commune (avril-mai 1871)’, in: Michel Cordillot (ed.), La Commune de Paris 1871. Les acteurs, l’événement, les lieux, Ivry-sur-Seine: Les Éditions de l’Atelier/Éditions Ouvrières, pp. 941-4.
Lefebvre, Henri (2018), La proclamation de la Commune, 26 mars 1871, Paris: La fabrique éditions.
Lehning, Arthur (1977), ‘Introduction’, in: Idem. (ed.), Bakunin – Archiv, vol. VI: Michel Bakounine sur la Guerre Franco–Allemande et la Révolution Sociale en France (1870–1871), Leiden: Brill, pp. xi–cxvii.
Lenoir, Hugues (2021), ‘La Commune de Paris et l’éducation’, in: Michel Cordillot (ed.), La Commune de Paris 1871. Les acteurs, l’événement, les lieux, Ivry-sur-Seine: Les Éditions de l’Atelier/Éditions Ouvrières, pp. 495-8.
Marx, Karl (1985), ‘Provisional Rules of the Association’, MECW, vol. 20, pp. 14–6.
(1986), The Civil War in France, MECW, vol. 22, pp. 307–59.
(1986), Economic Manuscripts of 1857–58, MECW, vol. 28.
(1986), Second Address of the General Council of the International Working Men’s Association on the Franco–Prussian War, MECW, vol. 22, pp. 263–70.
(1987), ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy (Rough Draft of 1857–58) [Second Instalment]’, MECW, vol. 29, p. 5–417.
(1989), Critique of the Gotha Programme, MECW, vol. 24, pp. 75–99.
(1989), ‘Notes on Bakunin’s Book Statehood and Anarchy’, MECW, vol. 24 p. 485–526.
(2014), ‘On the Paris Commune’, in: Marcello Musto (ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later, New York: Bloomsbury, pp. 211–44.
Marx, Karl, and Engels, Friedrich (1988), ‘Fictitious Splits in the International’, MECW, vol. 23, pp. 79–123.
(1988), Letters 1868–70, MECW, vol. 43.
(1989), Letters 1870–73, MECW, vol. 44.
(1992), Letters 1880–83, MECW, vol. 46.
Mazzini, Giuseppe (1978), L’Internazionale, in: Gian Mario Bravo (ed.), La Prima Internazionale: Storia documentaria, vol. II, Roma: Editori Riuniti, pp. 499–501.
Milza, Pierre (2009), L’année terrible. I: La guerre franco–prussienne (septembre 1870–mars 1871), Paris: Perrin.
(2009), L’année terrible. II: La Commune, Paris: Perrin.
Musto, Marcello (2014), ‘Introduction’, in: Marcello Musto (ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later, New York: Bloomsbury, pp. 1–68.
(2018), Another Marx: Early Manuscripts to the International, London: Bloomsbury.
(2020), ‘Communism’, in: Marcello Musto (ed.), The Marx Revival: Key Concepts and New Interpretations, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 24–50.
Rosselli, Nello (1927), Mazzini e Bakunin, Torino: Einaudi.
Rougerie, Jacques (1988), La Commune de 1871, Presses Universitaires de France.
(1971), Paris libre 1871, Paris: Seuil.
Sanchez, Gonzalo J. (1997), Organizing Independence: The Artists Federation of the Paris Commune and its Legacy, 1871–1889, Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.
Thomas, Edith (1963), Les «Pétroleuses», Paris: Gallimard.
Zaidman, Pierre-Henri (2021), ‘Le Comité central contre la Commune?’, in: Michel Cordillot (ed.), La Commune de Paris 1871. Les acteurs, l’événement, les lieux, Ivry-sur-Seine: Les Éditions de l’Atelier/Éditions Ouvrières, pp. 229–36.
Ximenes, Enrico Emilio (ed.) (1885), Epistolario di Giuseppe Garibaldi, vol. I, Milano: Brigola.

Categories
Book chapter

Alienation Redux: Marxian Perspectives

I. The origin of the concept
Alienation was one of the most important and widely debated themes of the 20th century, and Marx’s theorization played a key role in the discussions. Yet, contrary to what one might imagine, the concept itself did not develop in a linear manner, and the publication of previously unknown texts containing Marx’s reflections on alienation defined significant moments in the transformation and dissemination of the theory.
The meaning of the term changed several times over the centuries. In theological discourse it referred to the distance between man and God; in social contract theories, to loss of the individual’s original liberty; and in English political economy, to the transfer of property ownership. The first systematic philosophical account of alienation was in the work of G.W.F. Hegel (1770–1831), who in The Phenomenology of Spirit (1807) adopted the terms Entäusserung (literally self-externalization or renunciation) and Entfremdung (estrangement) to denote spirit’s becoming other than itself in the realm of objectivity. The whole question still featured prominently in the writings of the Hegelian Left, and Ludwig Feuerbach’s (1804–1872) theory of religious alienation – that is, of man’s projection of his own essence onto an imaginary deity – elaborated in the book The Essence of Christianity (1841), contributed significantly to the development of the concept.
Alienation subsequently disappeared from philosophical reflection, and none of the major thinkers of the second half of the 19th century paid it any great attention. Even Marx rarely used the term in the works published during his lifetime, and it was entirely absent from the Marxism of the Second International (1889–1914).
During this period, however, several thinkers developed concepts that were later associated with alienation. In his Division of Labour (1893) and Suicide (1897), Émile Durkheim (1858–1917) introduced the term ‘anomie’ to indicate a set of phenomena whereby the norms guaranteeing social cohesion enter into crisis following a major extension of the division of labour. Social trends concomitant with huge changes in the production process also lay at the basis of the thinking of German sociologists: Georg Simmel (1858–1918), in The Philosophy of Money (1900), paid great attention to the dominance of social institutions over individuals and to the growing impersonality of human relations; while Max Weber (1864–1920), in Economy and Society (1922), dwelled on the phenomena of ‘bureaucratization’ in society and ‘rational calculation’ in human relations, considering them to be the essence of capitalism. But these authors thought they were describing unstoppable tendencies, and their reflections were often guided by a wish to improve the existing social and political order – certainly not to replace it with a different one.

II. The rediscovery of alienation
The rediscovery of the theory of alienation occurred thanks to György Lukács (1885–1971), who in History and Class Consciousness (1923) referred to certain passages in Marx’s Capital (1867) – especially the section on ‘commodity fetishism’ [Der Fetischcharakter der Ware] – and introduced the term ‘reification’ [Verdinglichung, Versachlichung] to describe the phenomenon whereby labour activity confronts human beings as something objective and independent, dominating them through external autonomous laws. In essence, however, Lukács’s theory was still similar to Hegel’s, since he conceived of reification as an ‘central structural problem’. Much later, after the appearance of a French translation by Kostas Axelos (1924–2010) and Jacqueline Bois (?) had given this work a wide resonance among students and left-wing activists, Lukács decided to republish it together with a long self-critical preface (1967), in which he explained that ‘History and Class Consciousness follows Hegel in that it too equates alienation with objectification’.
Another author who focused on this theme in the 1920s was Isaak Rubin (1886–1937), whose Essays on Marx’s Theory of Value (1928) argued that the theory of commodity fetishism was ‘the basis of Marx’s entire economic system, and in particular of his theory of value’. In the view of this Russian author, the reification of social relations was ‘a real fact of the commodity-capitalist economy.’ It involved ‘‘materialization’ of production relations and not only ‘mystification’ or illusion. This is one of the characteristics of the economic structure of contemporary society. […] Fetishism is not only a phenomenon of social consciousness, but of social being.’ Despite these insights – prescient if we consider the period in which they were written – Rubin’s work did not promote a greater familiarity with the theory of alienation. Its reception in the West began only with its translation into English in 1972 and then from English into other languages.
The decisive event that finally revolutionized the diffusion of the concept of alienation was the appearance in 1932 of the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, a previously unpublished text from Marx’s youth. It rapidly became one of the most widely translated, circulated and discussed philosophical writings of the 20th century, revealing the central role that Marx had given to the theory of alienation during an important period for the formation of his economic thought: the discovery of political economy. For, with his category of alienated labour [entfremdete Arbeit], Marx not only widened the problem of alienation from the philosophical, religious and political sphere to the economic sphere of material production; he also showed that the economic sphere was essential to understanding and overcoming alienation in the other spheres. In the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, alienation is presented as the phenomenon through which the labour product confronts labour ‘as something alien, as a power independent of the producer’. For Marx,

the alienation [Entäusserung] of the worker in his product means not only that his labor becomes an object, an external existence, but that it exists outside him, independently, as something alien to him, and that it becomes a power on its own confronting him; it means that the life which he has conferred on the object confronts him as something hostile and alien.

Alongside this general definition, Marx listed four ways in which the worker is alienated in bourgeois society: 1) from the product of his labour, which becomes ‘an alien object that has power over him’; 2) in his working activity, which he perceives as ‘directed against himself’, as if it ‘does not belong to him’; 3) from ‘man’s species-being’, which is transformed into ‘a being alien to him’; and 4) from other human beings, and in relation to ‘the other man’s labour and object of labour.’
For Marx, in contrast to Hegel, alienation was not coterminous with objectification as such, but rather with a particular phenomenon within a precise form of economy: that is, wage labour and the transformation of labour products into objects standing opposed to producers. The political difference between these two positions is enormous. Whereas Hegel presented alienation as an ontological manifestation of labour, Marx conceived it as characteristic of a particular, capitalist, epoch of production, and thought it would be possible to overcome it through ‘the emancipation of society from private property’. He would make similar points in the notebooks containing extracts from James Mill’s (1773–1836) Elements of Political Economy (1821):

My work would be a free manifestation of life, hence an enjoyment of life. Presupposing private property, my work is an alienation of life, for I work in order to live, in order to obtain for myself the means of life. My work is not my life. Secondly, the specific nature of my individuality, therefore, would be affirmed in my labour, since the latter would be an affirmation of my individual life. Labour therefore would be true, active property. Presupposing private property, my individuality is alienated to such a degree that this activity is instead hateful to me, a torment, and rather the semblance of an activity. Hence, too, it is only a forced activity and one imposed on me only through an external fortuitous need, not through an inner, essential one.

So, even in these fragmentary and sometimes hesitant early writings, Marx always discussed alienation from a historical, not a natural, point of view.

III. The other conceptions of alienation
Much time would elapse, however, before a historical, non-ontological, conception of alienation could take hold. In the early 20th century, most authors who addressed the phenomenon considered it a universal aspect of human existence. In Being and Time (1927), for instance, Martin Heidegger (1889–1976) approached it in purely philosophical terms. The category he used for his phenomenology of alienation was ‘fallenness’ [Verfallen], that is the tendency of Being-There [Dasein] – which in Heidegger’s philosophy indicates the ontologically constituted human existence – to lose itself in the inauthenticity and conformism of the surrounding world. For Heidegger, ‘fallenness into the world means an absorption in Being-with-one-another, in so far as the latter is guided by idle talk, curiosity, and ambiguity’ – something truly quite different from the condition of the factory worker, which was at the centre of Marx’s theoretical preoccupations. Moreover, Heidegger did not regard this ‘fallenness’ as a ‘bad and deplorable ontical property of which, perhaps, more advanced stages of human culture might be able to rid themselves’, but rather as an ontological characteristic, ‘an existential mode of Being-in-the-world’.
Herbert Marcuse (1898–1979), who, unlike Heidegger, knew Marx’s work well, identified alienation with objectification as such, not with its manifestation in capitalist relations of production. In an essay he published in 1933, he argued that ‘the burdensome character of labor’ could not be attributed merely to ‘specific conditions in the performance of labor, to the social-technical structuring of labor’, but should be considered as one of its fundamental traits:

in laboring, the laborer is always ‘with the thing’: whether one stands by a machine, draws technical plans, is concerned with organizational measures, researches scientific problems, instructs people, etc. In his activity he allows himself to be directed by the thing, subjects himself and obeys its laws, even when he dominates his object. […] In each case he is not ‘with himself’ […] he is with an ‘Other than himself’ – even when this doing fulfils his own freely assumed life. This externalization and alienation of human existence […] is ineliminable in principle.

For Marcuse, there was a ‘primordial negativity of laboring activity’ that belonged to the ‘very essence of human existence’. The critique of alienation therefore became a critique of technology and labour in general, and its supersession was considered possible only in the moment of play, when people could attain a freedom denied them in productive activity: ‘In a single toss of a ball, the player achieves an infinitely greater triumph of human freedom over objectification than in the most powerful accomplishment of technical labor.’
In Eros and Civilization (1955), Marcuse took an equally clear distance from Marx’s conception, arguing that human emancipation could be achieved only through the abolition of labour and the affirmation of the libido and play in social relations. He discarded any possibility that a society based on common ownership of the means of production might overcome alienation, on the grounds that labour in general, not only wage labour, was

work for an apparatus which they [the vast majority of the population] do not control, which operates as an independent power to which individuals must submit if they want to live. And it becomes the more alien the more specialized the division of labor becomes. […] They work […] in alienation [… in the] absence of gratification [and in] negation of the pleasure principle.

The cardinal norm against which people should rebel was the ‘performance principle’ imposed by society. For, in Marcuse’s eyes:

the conflict between sexuality and civilization unfolds with this development of domination. Under the rule of the performance principle, body and mind are made into instruments of alienated labor; they can function as such instruments only if they renounce the freedom of the libidinal subject-object which the human organism primarily is and desires. […] Man exists […] as an instrument of alienated performance.

Hence, even if material production is organized equitably and rationally, ‘it can never be a realm of freedom and gratification […] It is the sphere outside labor which defines freedom and fulfilment.’ Marcuse’s alternative was to abandon the Promethean myth so dear to Marx and to draw closer to a Dionysian perspective: the ‘liberation of eros’. In contrast to Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), who had maintained in Civilization and Its Discontents (1929) that a non-repressive organization of society would entail a dangerous regression from the level of civilization attained in human relations, Marcuse was convinced that, if the liberation of the instincts took place in a technologically advanced ‘free society’ in the service of humanity, it would not only favour the march of progress but create ‘new and durable work relations’.
In this evolution of his thinking, a significant influence was exerted by the ideas of Charles Fourier (1772–1837) who, in his Theory of the Four Movements (1808), opposed advocates of the ‘commercial system’, to whom he used in a derogatory way the epithet of ‘civilized people’, and maintained that society would be free only when all its components had returned to expressing their passions. These were far more important to him than reason, ‘in the name of which were perpetrated all the massacres that history remembers’. According to Fourier, the main error of the political regime of his age was the repression of human nature. ‘Harmony’ would only be possible only if the individuals could have unleashed, as when they were in their natural state, all their instincts.
As for Marcuse, and his belief to oppose the technological domain in general, his indications about how the new society might come about were rather vague and utopian. He ended up opposing technological domination in general, so that his critique of alienation was no longer directed against capitalist relations of production, and his reflections on social change were so pessimistic as to include the working class among the subjects that operated in defence of the system.
The two leading figures in the Frankfurt School, Max Horkheimer (1895–1973) and Theodor Adorno (1903–1965), also developed a theory of generalized estrangement resulting from invasive social control and the manipulation of needs by the mass media. In Dialectic of Enlightenment (1944) they argued that ‘a technological rationale is the rationale of domination itself. It is the coercive nature of society alienated from itself.’ This meant that, in contemporary capitalism, even the sphere of leisure time – free and outside of work – was absorbed into the mechanisms reproducing consensus.
After World War II, the concept of alienation also found its way into psychoanalysis. Those who took it up started from Freud’s theory that man is forced to choose between nature and culture, and that, to enjoy the securities of civilization, he must necessarily renounce his impulses. Some psychologists linked alienation with the psychoses that appeared in certain individuals as a result of this conflict-ridden choice, thereby reducing the whole vast problematic of alienation to a merely subjective phenomenon.
The author who dealt most with alienation from within psychoanalysis was Erich Fromm (1900–1980). Unlike most of his colleagues, he never separated its manifestations from the capitalist historical context; indeed, his books The Sane Society (1955) and Marx’s Concept of Man (1961) used the concept to try to build a bridge between psychoanalysis and Marxism. Yet Fromm likewise always put the main emphasis on subjectivity, and his concept of alienation, which he summarized as ‘a mode of experience in which the individual experiences himself as alien’, remained too narrowly focused on the individual. Moreover, his account of Marx’s concept based itself only on the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 and showed a deep lack of understanding of the specificity and centrality of alienated labour in Marx’s thought. This lacuna prevented Fromm from giving due weight to objective alienation (that of the worker in the labour process and in relation to the labour product) and led him to advance positions that appear disingenuous in their neglect of the underlying structural relations.

Marx believed that the working class was the most alienated class. [… He] did not foresee the extent to which alienation was to become the fate of the vast majority of people. […] If anything, the clerk, the salesman, the executive, are even more alienated today than the skilled manual worker. The latter’s functioning still depends on the expression of certain personal qualities like skill, reliability, etc., and he is not forced to sell his ‘personality’, his smile, his opinions in the bargain.

One of the principal non-Marxist theories of alienation is that associated with Jean-Paul Sartre (1905–1980) and the French existentialists. Indeed, in the 1940s, marked by the horrors of war and the ensuing crise de conscience, the phenomenon of alienation – partly under the influence of Alexandre Kojève’s (1902–1968) neo-Hegelianism – became a recurrent reference both in philosophy and in narrative literature. Once again, however, the concept is much more generic than in Marx’s thought, becoming identified with a diffuse discontent of man in society, a split between human individuality and the world of experience, and an insurmountable condition humaine. The existentialist philosophers did not propose a social origin for alienation, but saw it as inevitably bound up with all ‘facticity’ (no doubt the failure of the Soviet experience favoured such a view) and human otherness. In 1955, Jean Hippolyte (1907–1968) set out this position in one of the most significant works in this tendency:

[alienation] does not seem to be reducible solely to the concept of the alienation of man under capitalism, as Marx understands it. The latter is only a particular case of a more universal problem of human self-consciousness which, being unable to conceive itself as an isolated cogito, can only recognize itself in a word which it constructs, in the other selves which it recognizes and by whom it is occasionally disowned. But this manner of self-discovery through the Other, this objectification, is always more or less an alienation, a loss of self and a simultaneous self-discovery. Thus, objectification and alienation are inseparable, and their union is simply the expression of a dialectical tension observed in the very movement of history.

Marx helped to develop a critique of human subjugation, basing himself on opposition to capitalist relations of production. The existentialists followed an opposite trajectory, trying to absorb those parts of Marx’s work that they thought useful for their own approach, in a merely philosophical discussion devoid of a specific historical critique.

IV. The debate on the conception of alienation in Marx’s early writings
The alienation debate that developed in France frequently drew upon Marx’s theories. As the Second World War gave way to a sense of profound anguish resulting from the barbarities of Nazism and fascism, the theme of the condition and destiny of the individual in society acquired great prominence. A growing philosophical interest in Marx was apparent everywhere in Europe. Often, however, it referred only to the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844; not even the sections of Capital that Lukács had used to construct his theory of reification were taken into consideration. Moreover, some sentences from the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 were taken out of context and transformed into sensational quotes supposedly proving the existence of a radically different ‘new Marx’, saturated with philosophy and free of the economic determinism that critics attributed to Capital – often without having read it. Again on the basis of the 1844 texts, the French existentialists laid by far the greatest emphasis on the concept of self-alienation [Selbstentfremdung], that is, the alienation of the worker from the human species and from others like himself – a phenomenon that Marx did discuss in his early writings, but always in connection with objective alienation.
The same error appears in a leading figure of post-war political theory, Hannah Arendt (1906–1975). In her The Human Condition (1958), she built her account of Marx’s concept of alienation around the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, even then isolating out only one of the types mentioned there by Marx: subjective alienation. This allowed her to claim:

expropriation and world alienation coincide, and the modern age, very much against the intentions of all the actors in the play, began by alienating certain strata of the population from the world. […] World alienation, and not self-alienation as Marx thought, has been the hallmark of the modern age.

Evidence of her scant familiarity with Marx’s mature work is the fact that, in conceding that Marx ‘was not altogether unaware of the implications of world alienation in capitalist economy’, she referred only to a few lines in his very early journalistic piece, ‘The Debates on the Wood Theft Laws’ (1842), not to the dozens of much more important pages in Capital and the preparatory manuscripts leading up to it. Her surprising conclusion was: ‘such occasional considerations play[ed] a minor role in his work, which remained firmly rooted in the modern age’s extreme subjectivism’. Where and how Marx prioritized ‘self-alienation’ in his analysis of capitalist society remains a mystery that Arendt never elucidated in her writings.
In the 1960s, the theory of alienation in the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 became the major bone of contention in the wider interpretation of Marx’s work. It was argued that a sharp distinction should be drawn between an ‘early Marx’ and a ‘mature Marx’ – an arbitrary and artificial opposition favoured both by those who preferred the early philosophical work and those for whom the only real Marx was the Marx of Capital (among them Louis Althusser (1918–1980) and the Russian scholars). Whereas the former considered the theory of alienation in the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 to be the most significant part of Marx’s social critique, the latter often exhibited a veritable ‘phobia of alienation’ and tried at first to downplay its relevance; or, when this strategy was no longer possible, the whole theme of alienation was written off as ‘a youthful peccadillo, a residue of Hegelianism’ that Marx later abandoned. Scholars in the first camp retorted that the 1844 manuscripts were written by a man of twenty-six just embarking on his major studies; but those in the second camp still refused to accept the importance of Marx’s theory of alienation, even when the publication of new texts made it clear that he never lost interest in it and that it occupied an important position in the main stages of his life’s work.
With the passage of time, successive supporters of the two positions engaged in lively debate, offering different answers concerning the ‘continuity’ of his thought. Were there in fact two distinct thinkers: an early Marx and a mature Marx? Or was there only one Marx, whose convictions remained substantially the same over the decades?
The opposition between these two views became ever sharper. The first, uniting Marxist-Leninist orthodoxy with those in Western Europe and elsewhere who shared its theoretical and political tenets, downplayed or dismissed altogether the importance of Marx’s early writings; they presented them as completely superficial in comparison with his later works and, in so doing, advanced a decidedly anti-humanist conception of his thought. The second view, advocated by a more heterogeneous group of authors, had as its common denominator a rejection of the dogmatism of official Communism and the correlation that its exponents sought to establish between Marx’s thought and the politics of the Soviet Union.
A couple of quotations from two major protagonists in the 1960s will do more than any possible commentary to elucidate the terms of the debate. For Althusser:

first of all, any discussion of Marx’s Early Works is a political discussion. Need we be reminded that Marx’s Early Works […] were exhumed by Social-Democrats and exploited by them to the detriment of Marxism-Leninism? […] This is the location of the discussion: the Young Marx. Really at stake in it: Marxism. The terms of the discussion: whether the Young Marx was already and wholly Marx.

Iring Fetscher (1922–2014), on the other hand, wrote that

the early writings of Marx centre so strongly on the liberation of man from every form of exploitation, domination and alienation, that a Soviet reader must have understood these comments as a criticism of his own situation under Stalinist domination. For this reason then, the early writings of Marx were never published in large, cheap editions in Russian. They were considered to be relatively insignificant works by the young Hegelian Marx who had not yet developed Marxism.

To argue, as so many did, that the theory of alienation in the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 was the central theme of Marx’s thought was so obviously wrong that it demonstrated no more than ignorance of his work. On the other hand, when Marx again became the most frequently discussed and quoted author in world philosophical literature because of his newly published pages on alienation, the silence from the Soviet Union on this whole topic, and on the controversies associated with it, provided a striking example of the instrumental use made of his writings in that country. For the existence of alienation in the Soviet Union and its satellites was dismissed out of hand, and any texts relating to the question were treated with suspicion. As Henri Lefebvre (1901–1991) put it, ‘in Soviet society, alienation could and must no longer be an issue. By order from above, for reasons of State, the concept had to disappear.’ Therefore, until the 1970s, very few authors in the ‘socialist camp’ paid any attention to the works in question.
A number of well-known Western authors also played down the complexity of the phenomenon. Lucien Goldmann (1913–1970), for instance, thought it possible to overcome alienation in the social-economic conditions of the time, and in his Dialectical Research (1959) argued that it would disappear, or recede, under the mere impact of planning. ‘Reification,’ he wrote, ‘is in fact a phenomenon closely bound up with the absence of planning and with production for the market’; Soviet socialism in the East and Keynesian policies in the West were resulting ‘in the first case in the elimination of reification, and in the second case in its progressive weakening’. History has demonstrated the faultiness of his predictions.
Whatever their academic discipline or political affiliation, interpreters of the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 may be divided into three groups. The first consists of all those who, in counterposing the Paris manuscripts to Capital, stress the theoretical pre-eminence of the former work. A second group attaches little significance in general to the manuscripts, while a third tends toward the thesis that there is a theoretical continuum between them and Capital.
Those who assumed a split between the ‘young’ and the ‘mature’ Marx, argued for the greater theoretical richness of the former, presented the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 as his most valuable text and sharply differentiated it from his later works. In particular, they tended to marginalize Capital often without studying it in any depth – a book altogether more demanding than the twenty odd pages on alienated labour in the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, about which almost all advanced various philosophical cogitations. In casting Marx’s thought as an ethical-humanist doctrine, these authors pursued the political objective of opposing the rigid orthodoxy of 1930s Soviet Marxism and contesting its hegemony within the workers’ movement. This theoretical offensive resulted in something very different, tending to enlarge the potential field of Marxist theory. Though the formulations were often hazy and generic, Marxism was no longer considered merely as an economic determinist theory and began to exert a greater attraction for large numbers of intellectuals and young people.
This approach began to make headway soon after the publication in 1932 of the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 and continued to win converts until the late 1950s, partly thanks to the explosive effect of a new text so unlike the dominant canon of Marxism. Its main sponsors were a motley group of heterodox Marxists, progressive Christians and existentialist philosophers, who interpreted Marx’s economic writings as a step back from what they saw as the centrality of the human person in his early theories.
The second group of interpreters, who regarded the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 as a transitional text of no special significance in the development of Marx’s thought. This was the most widely read account in the Soviet Union and its later satellite countries. The failure of the manuscripts to mention the ‘dictatorship of the proletariat’, together with the presence of themes such as human alienation and the exploitation of labour that highlighted some of the most glaring contradictions of ‘actually existing socialism’, led to their ostracization at the top of the ruling Communist parties. Not by chance were they excluded from editions of the works of Marx and Engels in various countries of the ‘socialist bloc’. Moreover, many of the authors in question wholly endorsed Vladimir Lenin’s (1870–1924) definition of the stages in the development of Marx’s thought – an approach later canonized by Marxism-Leninism, which, apart from being in many respects theoretically and politically questionable, made it impossible to account for Marx’s important work newly published for the first time eight years after the death of the Bolshevik leader.
As the influence of the Althusserian school grew in the 1960s, this reading also became popular in France and elsewhere in Western Europe. But, although its basic tenets are generally attributed to Althusser alone, the seeds were already there in Pierre Naville (1903–1993). He believed that Marxism was a science and that Marx’s early works, still imbued with the language and preoccupations of Left Hegelianism, marked a stage prior to the birth of a ‘new science’ in Capital. For Althusser, as we have seen, the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 represented the Marx most distant from Marxism.
A philologically unfounded contraposition of Marx’s early writings to the critique of political economy is shared by dissident or ‘revisionist’ Marxists eager to prioritize the former and by orthodox Communists focused on the ‘mature Marx’. Between them, they contributed to one of the principal misunderstandings in the history of Marxism: the myth of the ‘Young Marx’. This antagonism also gave rise to conflicts about the terminology and fundamental concepts of Marxian theory – for example, historical materialism versus historicism, or exploitation versus alienation.
The third and last group of interpreters of the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 consists of those who, from different political and theoretical standpoints, identified a substantive continuity in Marx’s work. The idea of an essential Marxian continuum, as opposed to a sharp theoretical break that completely discarded all that came before, was the inspiration for some of the best interpretations of the concept of alienation in the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844. Even then, however, there were a number of errors of interpretation – most notably, in certain authors, an underestimation of Marx’s huge advances of the 1850s and 1860s in the field of political economy. This went together with a diffuse tendency to reconstruct Marx’s thought through collections of quotations, without taking any account of the different periods in which the source texts had been written. All too often, the result was an author assembled out of pieces corresponding to the interpreter’s particular vision, passing backwards and forwards from Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 to Capital, as if Marx’s work were a single timeless and undifferentiated text.
To underline the importance of the concept of alienation in the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 for a better understanding of Marx’s development cannot involve drawing a veil of silence over the huge limits of this youthful text. Its author had scarcely begun to assimilate the basic concepts of political economy, and his conception of communism was no more than a confused synthesis of the philosophical studies he had undertaken until then. Captivating as they are, especially in the way they combine philosophical ideas of Hegel and Feuerbach with a critique of classical economic theory and a denunciation of working-class alienation, the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 are only a very first approximation, as is evident from their vagueness and eclecticism. They shed major light on the course Marx took, but an enormous distance still separates them from the themes and argument not only of the finished 1867 edition of Capital, Volume I, but also of the preparatory manuscripts for Capital, one of them published, that he drafted from the late 1850s on.
In contrast to analyses that either play up a distinctive ‘Young Marx’ or try to force a theoretical break in his work, the most incisive readings of the concept of alienation in the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 have known how to treat them as an interesting, but only initial, stage in Marx’s critical trajectory. Had he not continued his research but remained with the concepts of the Paris manuscripts, he would probably have been demoted to a place alongside Bruno Bauer (1809–1882) and Feuerbach in the sections of philosophy manuals devoted to the Hegelian Left.

V. The irresistible fascination of the theory of alienation
In the 1960s a real vogue began for theories of alienation, and hundreds of books and articles were published on it around the world. It was the age of alienation tout court. Authors from various political backgrounds and academic disciplines identified its causes as commodification, overspecialization, anomie, bureaucratization, conformism, consumerism, loss of a sense of self amid new technologies, even personal isolation, apathy, social or ethnic marginalization, and environmental pollution.
The concept of alienation seemed to express the spirit of the age to perfection, and indeed, in its critique of capitalist society, it became a meeting ground for anti-Soviet philosophical Marxism and the most democratic and progressive currents in the Catholic world. However, the popularity of the concept, and its indiscriminate application, created a profound terminological ambiguity. Within the space of a few years, alienation thus became an empty formula ranging right across the spectrum of human unhappiness – so all-encompassing that it generated the belief that it could never be modified.
With Guy Debord’s (1931–1994) book The Society of the Spectacle (1967), which became soon after its publication a veritable manifesto for the generation of students in revolt against the system, alienation theory linked up with the critique of immaterial production. Building on the theses of Horkheimer and Adorno, according to which the manufacturing of consent to the social order had spread to the leisure industry, Debord argued that the sphere of non-labour could no longer be considered separate from productive activity:

Whereas during the primitive stage of capitalist accumulation ‘political economy considers the proletarian only as a worker’, who only needs to be allotted the indispensable minimum for maintaining his labour power, and never considers him ‘in his leisure and humanity’, this ruling-class perspective is revised as soon as commodity abundance reaches a level that requires an additional collaboration from him. Once his workday is over, the worker is suddenly redeemed from the total contempt toward him that is so clearly implied by every aspect of the organization and surveillance of production, and finds himself seemingly treated like a grownup, with a great show of politeness, in his new role as a consumer. At this point the humanism of the commodity takes charge of the worker’s ‘leisure and humanity’ simply because political economy now can and must dominate those spheres.

For Debord, then, whereas the domination of the economy over social life initially took the form of a ‘degradation of being into having’, in the ‘present stage’ there had been a ‘general shift from having to appearing’. This idea led him to place the world of spectacle at the centre of his analysis: ‘The spectacle’s social function is the concrete manufacture of alienation’, the phenomenon through which ‘the fetishism of the commodity […] attains its ultimate fulfilment’. In these circumstances, alienation asserted itself to such a degree that it actually became an exciting experience for individuals, a new opium of the people that led them to consume and ‘identify with the dominant images’, taking them ever further from their own desires and real existence:

the spectacle is the stage at which the commodity has succeeded in totally colonizing social life. […] Modern economic production extends its dictatorship both extensively and intensively. […] With the ‘second industrial revolution’, alienated consumption has become just as much a duty for the masses as alienated production.

In the wake of Debord, Jean Baudrillard (1929–2007) has also used the concept of alienation to interpret critically the social changes that have appeared with mature capitalism. In The Consumer Society (1970), distancing himself from the Marxist focus on the centrality of production, he identified consumption as the primary factor in modern society. The ‘age of consumption’, in which advertising and opinion polls create spurious needs and mass consensus, was also ‘the age of radical alienation’.

Commodity logic has become generalized and today governs not only labour processes and material products, but the whole of culture, sexuality, and human relations, including even fantasies and individual drives. […] Everything is spectacularized or, in other words, evoked, provoked and orchestrated into images, signs, consumable models.

Baudrillard’s political conclusions, however, were rather confused and pessimistic. Faced with social ferment on a mass scale, he thought ‘the rebels of May 1968’ had fallen into the trap of ‘reifying objects and consumption excessively by according them diabolic value’; and he criticized ‘all the disquisitions on ‘alienation’, and all the derisive force of pop and anti-art’ as a mere ‘indictment [that] is part of the game: it is the critical mirage, the anti-fable which rounds off the fable’. Now a long way from Marxism, for which the working class is the social reference point for changing the world, he ended his book with a messianic appeal, as generic as it was ephemeral: ‘We shall await the violent irruptions and sudden disintegrations which will come, just as unforeseeably and as certainly as May 1968, to wreck this white Mass.’

VI. Alienation theory in North American sociology
In the 1950s, the concept of alienation also entered the vocabulary of North American sociology, but the approach to the subject there was quite different from the one prevailing in Europe at the time. Mainstream sociology treated alienation as a problem of the individual human being, not of social relations, and the search for solutions centred on the capacity of individuals to adjust to the existing order, not on collective practices to change society.
Here, too, there was a long period of uncertainty before a clear and shared definition took shape. Some authors considered alienation to be a positive phenomenon, a means of expressing creativity, which was inherent in the human condition in general. Another common view was that it sprang from the fissure between individual and society; Seymour Melman (1917–2004), for instance, traced alienation to the split between the formulation and execution of decisions, and considered that it affected workers and managers alike. In ‘A Measure of Alienation’ (1957), which inaugurated a debate on the concept in the American Sociological Review, Gwynn Nettler (1913–2007) used an opinion survey as a way of trying to establish a definition. But, in sharp contrast to the rigorous labour-movement tradition of investigations into working conditions, his questionnaire seemed to draw its inspiration more from the McCarthyite canons of the time than from those of scientific research. For in effect he identified alienation with a rejection of the conservative principles of American society: ‘consistent maintenance of unpopular and averse attitudes toward familism, the mass media and mass taste, current events, popular education, conventional religion and the telic view of life, nationalism, and the voting process’.
The conceptual narrowness of the American sociological panorama changed after the publication of Melvin Seeman’s (1918–2020) short article ‘On the Meaning of Alienation’ (1959), which soon became an obligatory reference for all scholars in the field. His list of the five main types of alienation – powerlessness, meaninglessness (that is, the inability to understand the events in which one is inserted), normlessness, isolation and self-estrangement – showed that he too approached the phenomenon in a primarily subjective perspective.
Robert Blauner (1929–2016), in his book Alienation and Freedom (1964), similarly defined alienation as ‘a quality of personal experience which results from specific kinds of social arrangements’, even if his copious research led him to trace its causes to ‘employment in the large-scale organizations and impersonal bureaucracies that pervade all industrial societies’.
American sociology, then, generally saw alienation as a problem linked to the system of industrial production, whether capitalist or socialist, and mainly affecting human consciousness. This major shift of approach ultimately downgraded, or even excluded, analysis of the historical-social factors that determine alienation, producing a kind of hyper-psychologization that treated it not as a social problem but as a pathological symptom of individuals, curable at the individual level. Whereas in the Marxist tradition the concept of alienation had contributed to some of the sharpest criticisms of the capitalist mode of production, its institutionalization in the realm of sociology reduced it to a phenomenon of individual maladjustment to social norms. In the same way, the critical dimension that the concept had had in philosophy (even for authors who thought it a horizon that could never be transcended) now gave way to an illusory neutrality.
Another effect of this metamorphosis was the theoretical impoverishment of the concept. From a complex phenomenon related to man’s work activity and social and intellectual existence, alienation became a partial category divided up in accordance with academic research specializations. American sociologists argued that this methodological choice enabled them to free the study of alienation from any political connotations and to confer on it scientific objectivity. But, in reality, this a-political ‘turn’ had evident ideological implications, since support for the dominant values and social order lay hidden behind the banner of de-ideologization and value-neutrality.
So, the difference between Marxist and American sociological conceptions of alienation was not that the former were political and the latter scientific. Rather, Marxist theorists were bearers of values opposed to the hegemonic ones in American society, whereas the US sociologists upheld the values of the existing social order, skillfully dressed up as eternal values of the human species. In the American academic context, the concept of alienation underwent a veritable distortion and ended up being used by defenders of the very social classes against which it had for so long been directed.

VII. The concept of alienation in Capital and its preparatory manuscripts
Marx’s own writings played an important role for those seeking to counter this situation. The initial focus on the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 tended to shift after the publication of new texts and with them it was possible to reconstruct the path of his elaboration from the early writings to Capital.
In the second half of the 1840s, Marx no longer made frequent use of the term ‘alienation’. The main exceptions were The Holy Family (1845), The German Ideology (1845-46) and the Manifesto of the Communist Party (1848) all jointly authored with Engels.
In Wage-Labour and Capital (1849), a collection of articles based on lectures he gave to the German Workers’ League in Brussels in 1847, Marx returned to the theory of alienation. But the term itself did not appear in these texts, because it would have had too abstract a ring for his intended audience. He wrote that wage labour does not enter into the worker’s ‘own life activity’ but represents a ‘sacrifice of his life’. Labour-power is a commodity that the worker is forced to sell ‘in order to live’, and ‘the product of his activity, therefore, is not the aim of his activity’:

And the labourer who for twelve hours long, weaves, spins, bores, turns, builds, shovels, breaks stone, carries hods, and so on-is this twelve hours’ weaving, spinning, boring, turning, building, shovelling, stone-breaking, regarded by him as a manifestation of life, as life? Quite the contrary. Life for him begins where this activity ceases, at the table, at the tavern seat, in bed. The twelve hours’ work, on the other hand, has no meaning for him as weaving, spinning, boring, and so on, but only as earnings, which enable him to sit down at a table, to take his seat in the tavern, and to lie down in a bed. If the silk-warm’s object in spinning were to prolong its existence as caterpillar, it would be a perfect example of a wage-worker.

Until the late 1850s there were no more references to the theory of alienation in Marx’s work. Following the defeat of the 1848 revolutions, he was forced to go into exile in London; once there, he concentrated all his energies on the study of political economy and, apart from a few short works with a historical theme, did not publish another book. When he began to write about economics again, however, in the Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy (1857–58), better known as the Grundrisse, he more than once used the term ‘alienation’. This text recalled in many respects the analyses of the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, although nearly a decade of studies in the British Library had allowed him to make them considerably more profound:

The social character of activity, as well as the social form of the product, and the share of individuals in production here appear as something alien and objective, confronting the individuals, not as their relation to one another, but as their subordination to relations which subsist independently of them and which arise out of collisions between mutually indifferent individuals. The general exchange of activities and products, which has become a vital condition for each individual – their mutual interconnection – here appears as something alien to them, autonomous, as a thing. In exchange value, the social connection between persons is transformed into a social relation between things; personal capacity into objective wealth.

The account of alienation in the Grundrisse, then, is enriched by a greater understanding of economic categories and by more rigorous social analysis. The link it establishes between alienation and exchange-value is an important aspect of this. And, in one of the most dazzling passages on this phenomenon of modern society, Marx links alienation to the opposition between capital and ‘living labour-power’:

The objective conditions of living labour appear as separated, independent values opposite living labour capacity as subjective being. […] The objective conditions of living labour capacity are presupposed as having an existence independent of it, as the objectivity of a subject distinct from living labour capacity and standing independently over against it; the reproduction and realization, i.e. the expansion of these objective conditions, is therefore at the same time their own reproduction and new production as the wealth of an alien subject indifferently and independently standing over against labour capacity. What is reproduced and produced anew is not only the presence of these objective conditions of living labour, but also their presence as independent values, i.e. values belonging to an alien subject, confronting this living labour capacity. The objective conditions of labour attain a subjective existence vis-à-vis living labour capacity – capital turns into capitalist.

The Grundrisse was not the only text of Marx’s maturity to feature an account of alienation. Five years after it was composed, the ‘Results of the Immediate Process of Production’ – also known as ‘Capital, Volume I: Book 1, Chapter VI, unpublished’ (1863–64) – brought the economic and political analyses of alienation more closely together. ‘The rule of the capitalist over the worker,’ Marx wrote, ‘is the rule of things over man, of dead labour over the living, of the product over the producer.’ In capitalist society, by virtue of ‘the transposition of the social productivity of labour into the material attributes of capital’, there is a veritable ‘personification of things and reification of persons’, creating the appearance that ‘the material conditions of labour are not subject to the worker, but he to them’. In reality, he argued:

Capital is not a thing, any more than money is a thing. In capital, as in money, certain specific social relations of production between people appear as relations of things to people, or else certain social relations appear as the natural properties of things in society. Without a class dependent on wages, the moment individuals confront each other as free persons, there can be no production of surplus-value; without the production of surplus-value there can be no capitalist production, and hence no capital and no capitalist! Capital and wage-labour (it is thus we designate the labour of the worker who sells his own labour-power) only express two aspects of the self-same relationship. Money cannot become capital unless it is exchanged for labour-power, a commodity sold by the worker himself. Conversely, work can only be wage-labour when its own material conditions confront it as autonomous powers, alien property, value existing for itself and maintaining itself, in short as capital. If capital in its material aspects, i.e. in the use-values in which it has its being, must depend for its existence on the material conditions of labour, these material conditions must equally, on the formal side, confront labour as alien, autonomous powers, as value – objectified labour – which treats living labour as a mere means whereby to maintain and increase itself.

In the capitalist mode of production, human labour becomes an instrument of the valorization process of capital, which, ‘by incorporating living labour-power into the material constituents of capital, […] becomes an animated monster and […] starts to act as if consumed by love.’ This mechanism keeps expanding in scale, until co-operation in the production process, scientific discoveries and the deployment of machinery – all of them social processes belonging to the collective – become forces of capital that appear as its natural properties, confronting the workers in the shape of the capitalist order:

The productive forces […] developed [by] social labour […] appear as the productive forces of capitalism. […] Collective unity in co-operation, combination in the division of labour, the use of the forces of nature and the sciences, of the products of labour, as machinery – all these confront the individual workers as something alien, objective, ready-made, existing without their intervention, and frequently even hostile to them. They all appear quite simply as the prevailing forms of the instruments of labour. As objects they are independent of the workers whom they dominate. Though the workshop is to a degree the product of the workers’ combination, its entire intelligence and will seem to be incorporated in the capitalist or his understrappers, and the workers find themselves confronted by the functions of the capital that lives in the capitalist.

Through this process capital becomes something ‘highly mysterious’. ‘The conditions of labour pile up in front of the worker as social forces, and they assume a capitalized form.’
Beginning in the 1960s, the diffusion of ‘Capital, Volume I: Book 1, Chapter VI, unpublished’ and, above all, of the Grundrisse paved the way for a conception of alienation different from the one then hegemonic in sociology and psychology. It was a conception geared to the overcoming of alienation in practice – to the political action of social movements, parties and trade unions to change the working and living conditions of the working class. The publication of what, after the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 in the 1930s, may be thought of as the ‘second generation’ of Marx’s writings on alienation therefore provided not only a coherent theoretical basis for new studies of alienation, but above all an anti-capitalist ideological platform for the extraordinary political and social movement that exploded in the world during those years. Alienation left the books of philosophers and the lecture halls of universities, took to the streets and the space of workers’ struggles, and became a critique of bourgeois society in general.

VIII. Commodity fetishism
One of Marx’s best accounts of alienation is contained in the famous section of Capital on ‘The Fetishism of the Commodity and Its Secret’, where he shows that, in capitalist society, people are dominated by the products they have created . Here, the relations among them appear not ‘as direct social relations between persons […], but rather as material relations between persons and social relations between things’. As he famously wrote:

The mysterious character of the commodity-form consists […] in the fact that the commodity reflects the social characteristics of men’s own labour as objective characteristics of the products of labour themselves, as the socio-natural properties of these things. Hence it also reflects the social relation of the producers to the sum total of labour as a social relation between objects, a relation which exists apart from and outside the producers. Through this substitution, the products of labour become commodities, sensuous things which are at the same time supra-sensible or social. […] It is nothing but the definite social relation between men themselves which assumes here, for them, the fantastic form of a relation between things. In order, therefore, to find an analogy we must take flight into the misty realm of religion. There the products of the human brain appear as autonomous figures endowed with a life of their own, which enter into relations both with each other and with the human race. So, it is in the world of commodities with the products of men’s hands. I call this the fetishism which attaches itself to the products of labour as soon as they are produced as commodities, and is therefore inseparable from the production of commodities.

Two elements in this definition mark a clear dividing line between Marx’s conception of alienation and the one held by most of the other authors we have been discussing. First, Marx conceives of fetishism not as an individual problem but as a social phenomenon, not as an affair of the mind but as a real power, a particular form of domination, which establishes itself in market economy as a result of the transformation of objects into subjects. For this reason, his analysis of alienation does not confine itself to the disquiet of individual women and men, but extends to the social processes and productive activities underlying it. Second, for Marx fetishism manifests itself in a precise historical reality of production, the reality of wage labour; it is not part of the relation between people and things as such, but rather of the relation between man and a particular kind of objectivity: the commodity form.
As a consequence of this peculiarity of capitalism, individuals had value only as producers, and ‘human existence’ was subjugated to the act of the ‘production of commodities’. Hence ‘the process of production’ had ‘mastery over man, instead of being controlled by him’. Capital ‘care[d] nothing for the length of life of labour power’ and attached no importance to improvements in the living conditions of the proletariat. Capital ‘attains this objective by shortening the life of labour-power.’
In bourgeois society, human qualities and relations turn into qualities and relations among things. This theory of what Lukács would call reification illustrated alienation from the point of view of human relations, while the concept of fetishism treated it in relation to commodities. Pace those who deny that a theory of alienation is present in Marx’s mature work, we should stress that commodity fetishism did not replace alienation but was only one aspect of it.
The theoretical advance from the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 to Capital and its related materials does not, however, consist only in the greater precision of his account of alienation. There is also a reformulation of the measures that Marx considers necessary for it to be overcome. Whereas in 1844 he had argued that human beings would eliminate alienation by abolishing private production and the division of labour, the path to a society free of alienation was much more complicated in Capital and its preparatory manuscripts.
Marx held that capitalism was a system in which the workers were subject to capital and the conditions it imposed. Nevertheless, it had created the foundations for a more advanced society, and by generalizing its benefits humanity would be able to progress along the faster road of social development that it had opened up. One of Marx’s most analytic accounts of the positive effects of capitalist production is to be found towards the end of Capital, Volume I, in the section entitled ‘Historical Tendency of Capitalist Accumulation’. In the passage in question, he summarizes the six conditions generated by capitalism – particularly by its centralization – that constitute the basic prerequisites for the birth of communist society. These are: 1) the cooperative labour process; 2) the scientific-technological contribution to production; 3) appropriation of the forces of nature by production; 4) creation of machinery that workers can only operate in common; 5) the economizing of all means of production; and 6) the tendency to the creation of the world market. For Marx:

Hand in hand with this centralization, or this expropriation of many capitalists by a few, other developments take place on an ever-increasing scale, such as the growth of the co-operative form of the labour process, the conscious technical application of science, the planned exploitation of the soil, the transformation of the means of labour into forms in which they can only be used in common, the economizing of all means of production by their use as the means of production of combined, socialized labour, the entanglement of all peoples in the net of the world market, and, with this, the growth of the international character of the capitalist regime.

Marx well knew that the concentration of production in the hands of a small number of bosses increased ‘the mass of misery, oppression, slavery, degradation and exploitation’ for the working class, but he was also aware that ‘the co-operation of wage-labourers is entirely brought about by the capital that employs them.’ He was convinced that the extraordinary growth of the productive forces under capitalism, greater and faster than in all previously existing modes of production, had created the conditions to overcome the social-economic relations that capitalism had itself brought about – and therefore to achieve the transition to socialist society.

9. Communism, emancipation and freedom
According to Marx, a system that produced an enormous accumulation of wealth for the few and deprivation and exploitation for the general mass of workers must be replaced with an ‘association of free men, working with the means of production held in common, and expending their many different forms of labour-power in full self-awareness as one single social labour force.’ In Capital, Volume I, Marx explained that the ‘ruling principle’ of this ‘higher form of society’ would be ‘the full and free development of every individual’. In the Grundrisse he wrote that in communist society production would be ‘directly social’, ‘the offspring of association, which distributes labour internally’. It would be managed by individuals as their ‘common wealth’. The ‘social character of production’ [gesellschaftliche Charakter der Produktion] would ‘make the product into a communal, general product from the outset’; its associative character would be ‘presupposed’ and ‘the labour of the individual […] from the outset taken as social labour’. As Marx stressed in the Critique of the Gotha Programme (1875), in postcapitalist society ‘individual labour no longer exists in an indirect fashion but directly as a component part of the total labour.’ In addition, the workers would be able to create the conditions for the eventual disappearance of ‘the enslaving subordination of the individual to the division of labour’.
In Capital, Volume I, Marx highlighted that in communism, the conditions would be created for a form of ‘planned cooperation’ through which the worker ‘strips off the fetters of his individuality and develops the capabilities of his species’. In Capital, Volume II (1885), Marx pointed out that society would then be in a position to ‘reckon in advance how much labour, means of production and means of subsistence it can spend, without dislocation’, unlike in capitalism ‘where any kind of social rationality asserts itself only post festum’ and ‘major disturbances can and must occur constantly’.
This type of production would differ from wage labour because it would place its determining factors under collective governance, take on an immediately general character and convert labour into a truly social activity. This was a conception of society at the opposite pole from Thomas Hobbes’s (1588–1679) ‘war of all against all’. In referring to so-called free competition, or the seemingly equal positions of workers and capitalists on the market in bourgeois society, Marx stated that the reality was totally different from the human freedom exalted by apologists of capitalism. The system posed a huge obstacle to democracy, and he showed better than anyone else that the workers did not receive an equivalent for what they produced. In the Grundrisse, he explained that what was presented as an ‘exchange of equivalents’ was, in fact, appropriation of the workers’ ‘labour time without exchange’; the relationship of exchange ‘dropped away entirely, or it became a ‘mere semblance’. Relations between persons were ‘actuated only by self-interest’. This ‘clash of individuals’ had been passed off as the ‘the absolute form of existence of free individuality in the sphere of production and exchange’. But for Marx ‘nothing could be further from the truth’, since ‘it is not individuals who are set free by free competition; it is, rather, capital which is set free’. In the Economic Manuscripts of 1863-67, he denounced the fact that ‘surplus labour is initially pocketed, in the name of society, by the capitalist’ – the surplus labour that is ‘the basis of society’s free time’ and, by virtue of this, the ‘material basis of its whole development and of civilization in general’. And in Capital, Volume I, he showed that the wealth of the bourgeoisie was possible only by ‘turning the whole lifetime of the worker and his family into labour-time’.
In the Grundrisse, Marx observed that in capitalism ‘individuals are subsumed under social production’, which ‘exists outside them as their fate’. This happens only through the attribution of exchange-value conferred on the products, whose buying and selling takes place post festum. Furthermore, ‘all social powers of production’ – including scientific discoveries, which appear as alien and external to the worker, are posited by capital. The very association of the workers, at the places and in the act of production, is ‘operated by capital’ and is therefore ‘only formal’. Use of the goods created by the workers ‘is not mediated by exchange between mutually independent labours or products of labour’, but rather ‘the social conditions of production within which the individual is active.’ Marx explained how productive activity in the factory ‘concerns only the product of labour, not labour itself’, since it ‘will occur initially only in a common location, under overseers, regimentation, greater discipline, regularity and the posited dependence in production itself on capital’.
In order to change these conditions, contrary to the view of many of Marx’s socialist contemporaries, a redistribution of consumption goods was not sufficient to reverse this state of affairs. A root-and-branch change in the productive assets of society was necessary. Thus, in the Grundrisse Marx noted that ‘the demand that wage labour be continued but capital suspended is self-contradictory, self-dissolving’. What was required was ‘dissolution of the mode of production and form of society based upon exchange value’. In the address published under the title Value, Price and Profit (1865), he called on workers to ‘inscribe on their banner’ not ‘the conservative motto: ‘A fair day’s wage for a fair day’s work!’ [but] the revolutionary watchword: ‘Abolition of the wages system!’’
Furthermore, the Critique of the Gotha Programme made the point that in the capitalist mode of production ‘the material conditions of production are in the hands of non-workers in the form of capital and land ownership, while the masses are only owners of the personal condition of production, of labour power’. Therefore, it was essential to overturn the property relations at the base of the bourgeois mode of production. In the Grundrisse, Marx recalled that ‘the laws of private property – liberty, equality, property – property in one’s own labour, and free disposition over it – tum into the worker’s propertylessness, and the dispossession of his labour, i.e. the fact that he relates to it as alien property and vice versa.’ And in 1869, in a report of the General Council of the International Working Men’s Association, he asserted that ‘private property in the means of production’ served to give the bourgeois class ‘the power to live without labour upon other people’s labour’. He repeated this point in another short political text, the Preamble to the Programme of the French Workers’ Party (1880), adding that ‘the producers cannot be free unless they are in possession of the means of production’ and that the goal of the proletarian struggle must be ‘the return of all the means of production to collective ownership’.
In Capital, Volume III (1894), Marx observed that when the workers had established a communist mode of production ‘private property of the earth by single individuals [would] appear just as absurd as private property of one human being by another’. He directed his most radical critique against the destructive possession inherent in capitalism, insisting that ‘even an entire society, a nation, or even all simultaneously existing societies taken together, are not the owners of the earth’. For Marx, human beings were ‘simply its possessors, its beneficiaries, and have to bequeath it in an improved state to succeeding generations, as good heads of the household [boni patres familias]’.
A different kind of ownership of the means of production would also radically change the life-time of society. In Capital, Volume I, Marx unfolded with complete clarity the reasons why in capitalism ‘the shortening of the working day is […] by no means what is aimed at in capitalist production, when labour is economized by increasing its productivity’. The time that the progress of science and technology makes available for individuals is in reality immediately converted into surplus value. The only aim of the dominant class is the ‘shortening of the labour-time necessary for the production of a definite quantity of commodities’. Its only purpose in developing the productive forces is the ‘shortening of that part of the working day in which the worker must work for himself, and the lengthening […] the other part […] in which he is free to work for nothing for the capitalist’. This system differs from slavery or the corvées due to the feudal lord, since ‘surplus labour and necessary labour are mingled together’ and make the reality of exploitation harder to perceive.
In the Grundrisse, Marx showed that ‘free time for a few’ is possible only because of this surplus labour time of the many. The bourgeoisie secures growth of its material and cultural capabilities only thanks to the limitation of those of the proletariat. The same happens in the most advanced capitalist countries, to the detriment of those on the periphery of the system. In the Economic Manuscript of 1861-63, Marx emphasized that the ‘free development’ of the dominant class is ‘based on the restriction of development’ among the working class’; ‘the surplus labour of the workers’ is the ‘natural basis of the social development of the other section’. The surplus labour time of the workers is not only the pillar supporting the ‘material conditions of life’ for the bourgeoisie; it also creates the conditions for its ‘free time, the sphere of [its] development’. Marx could not have put it better: ‘the free time of one section corresponds to the time in thrall to labour of the other section.’
For Marx communist society, by contrast, would be characterized by a general reduction in labour time. In the ‘Instructions for the Delegates of the Provisional General Council’, composed in August 1866 for the International Working Men’s Association , Marx wrote in forthright terms: ‘a preliminary condition, without which all further attempts at improvement and emancipation must prove abortive, is the limitation of the working day.’ It was needed not only ‘to restore the health and physical energies of the working class’ but also ‘to secure them the possibility of intellectual development, sociable intercourse, social and political action’. Similarly, in Capital, Volume I, while noting that workers’ ‘time for education, for intellectual development, for the fulfilling of social functions, for social intercourse, for the free play of the vital forces of his body and his mind’ counted as pure ‘foolishness’ in the eyes of the capitalist class, Marx implied that these would be the basic elements of the new society. As he put it in the Grundrisse, a reduction in the hours devoted to labour – and not only labour to create surplus value for the capitalist class – would favour ‘the artistic, scientific etc. development of the individuals in the time set free, and with the means created, for all of them’.
On the basis of these convictions, Marx identified the ‘economy of time, along with the planned distribution of labour time among the various branches of production’ as ‘first economic law on the basis of communal production’. In Theories of Surplus Value (1862–63) he made it even clearer that ‘real wealth’ was nothing other than ‘disposable time’. In communist society, workers’ self-management would ensure that ‘a greater quantity of time’ was ‘not absorbed in direct productive labour but […] available for enjoyment, for leisure, thus giving scope for free activity and development’. In this text, so too in the Grundrisse, Marx quoted a short anonymous pamphlet entitled The Source and Remedy of the National Difficulties, Deduced from Principles of Political Economy, in a Letter to Lord John Russell (1821), whose definition of well-being he fully shared: that is, ‘truly wealthy a nation, if there is no interest or if the working day is 6 hours rather than 12’. Wealth is not command over surplus labour time – the real wealth – ‘but disposable time, in addition to that employed in immediate production, for every individual and for the whole society.’ Elsewhere in the Grundrisse he asked rhetorically: ‘what is wealth other than the universality of individual needs, capacities, pleasures, productive forces […] the absolute working out of his creative potentialities?’ It is evident, then, that the socialist model in Marx’s mind did not involve a state of generalized poverty, but rather the attainment of greater collective wealth.
For Marx, living in a non-alienated society meant building a social organization in which a fundamental value was given to individual freedom. He attached a fundamental value to individual freedom, and his communism was radically different from the levelling of classes envisaged by his various predecessors or pursued by many of his epigones. In the Grundrisse however, he pointed to the ‘foolishness of those socialists (namely the French, who want to depict socialism as the realization of the ideals of bourgeois society articulated by the French revolution) who demonstrate that exchange and exchange value etc. are originally […] a system of universal freedom and equality, but that they have been perverted by money, capital’. He labelled it an ‘absurdity’ to regard ‘free competition is the ultimate development of human freedom’; it was tantamount to a belief that ‘the rule of the bourgeoisie is the terminal point of world history’, which he mockingly described as ‘middle-class rule is the culmination of world history – certainly an agreeable thought for the parvenus of the day before yesterday’. In the same way, Marx contested the liberal ideology according to which ‘the negation of free competition [was] equivalent to the negation of individual freedom and of social production based upon individual freedom’. In bourgeois society, the only possible ‘free development’ was ‘on the limited basis of the domination of capital’. But that ‘type of individual freedom’ was, at the same time, ‘the most sweeping abolition of all individual freedom and the complete subjugation of individuality to social conditions which assume the form of objective powers, indeed of overpowering objects […] independent of the individuals relating to one another.’ As he wrote in Capital, Volume III:

The realm of freedom really begins only where labour determined by necessity and external expediency ends; it lies by its very nature beyond the sphere of material production proper. Just as the savage must wrestle with nature to satisfy his needs, to maintain and reproduce his life, so must civilized man, and he must do so in all forms of society and under all possible modes of production. This realm of natural necessity expands with his development, because his needs do too; but the productive forces to satisfy these expand at the same time. Freedom, in this sphere, can consist only in this, that socialized man, the associated producers, govern the human metabolism with nature in a rational way, bringing it under their collective control instead of being dominated by it as a blind power; accomplishing it with the least expenditure of energy and in conditions most worthy and appropriate for their human nature. But this always remains a realm of necessity. The true realm of freedom, the development of human powers as an end in itself, begins beyond it, though it can only flourish with this realm of necessity as its basis. The reduction of the working day is the basic prerequisite.

This post-capitalist system of production, together with scientific-technological progress and a consequent reduction of the working day, creates the possibility for a new social formation in which the coercive, alienated labour imposed by capital and subject to its laws is gradually replaced with conscious, creative activity beyond the yoke of necessity, and in which complete social relations take the place of random, undifferentiated exchange dictated by the laws of commodities and money . It is no longer the realm of freedom for capital but the realm of genuine human freedom.

References
Althusser, Louis (1969) For Marx, Harmondsworth: Penguin.
Althusser, Louis (1971) Essays in Self-Criticism, London: New Books.
Arendt, Hannah (1958) The Human Condition, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Aron, Raymond (1969) D’une Sainte Famille à l’autre, Paris: Éditions Gallimard.
Axelos, Kostas (1976) Alienation, Praxis, and Techné in the Thought of Karl Marx, Austin/London: University of Texas Press.
Baudrillard, Jean (1998) The Consumer Society, London: Sage.
Bell, Daniel (1959) ‘The Rediscovery of Alienation: Some notes along the quest for the historical Marx’, Journal of Philosophy 56, no. 24, pp. 933-952.
Blauner, Robert (1964) Alienation and Freedom, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Clark, John (1959) ‘Measuring alienation within a social system’, American Sociological Review 24, no. 6, pp. 849-852.
D’Abbiero, Marcella (1970) Alienazione in Hegel. Usi e significati di Entaeusserung, Entfremdung, Veraeusserung, Rome: Edizioni dell’Ateneo.
Debord, Guy (2002) The Society of the Spectacle, Canberra: Hobgoblin.
Fetscher, Iring (1971) Marx and Marxism, New York: Herder and Herder.
Fourier, Charles (1996) The Theory of the Four Movements, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Freud, Sigmund (1962) Civilization and its Discontents, New York: Norton.
Friedmann, Georges (1964) The Anatomy of Work, New York: Glencoe Press.
Fromm, Erich (1961) Marx’s Concept of Man, New York: Frederick Ungar.
Fromm, Erich (1965a) The Same Society, New York: Fawcett.
Fromm, Erich (ed.) (1965b) ‘The Application of Humanist Psychoanalysis to Marx’s Theory’, in Erich Fromm (ed.), Socialist Humanism, New York: Doubleday, pp. 228-245.
Geyer, Felix (1982) ‘A General Systems Approach to Psychiatric and Sociological De-alienation’, in Giora Shoham (ed.), Alienation and Anomie Revisited, Tel Aviv: Ramot, pp. 139-174.
Geyer, Felix and David Schweitzer (eds.) (1976) ‘Introduction’, in Felix Geyer and David Schweitzer, Theories of Alienation, Leiden: Martinus Nijhoff, pp. xiv-xxv.
Goldmann, Lucien (1959) Recherches dialectiques, Paris: Gallimard.
Heidegger, Martin (1962) Being and Time, San Francisco: Harper.
Heidegger, Martin (1993) ‘Letter on Humanism’, in Martin Heidegger, Basic Writings, London: Routledge.
Heinz, Walter R. (1992) ‘Changes in the Methodology of Alienation Research’, in Felix Geyer and Walter R. Heinz (ed.), Alienation, Society, and the Individual, New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction, pp. 213-221.
Hess, Moses (2011) On the Essence of Money, Ann Arbor: Charles River Editors.
Horkheimer, Max and Theodor W. Adorno (1972) Dialectic of Enlightenment, New York: Seabury Press.
Horowitz, Irving Louis (1996) ‘The Strange Career of Alienation: How a Concept is Transformed Without Permission of its Founders’, in Felix Geyer (ed.), Alienation, Ethnicity, and Postmodernism, Westport: Greenwood Press, pp. 17-20.
Horton, John (1964) ‘The Dehumanization of Anomie and Alienation: a problem in the ideology of sociology’, The British Journal of Sociology 15, no. 4, pp. 283-300.
Hyppolite, Jean (1969) Studies on Marx and Hegel, New York: Basic Books.
Kaufmann, Walter (1970) ‘The Inevitability of Alienation’, in Richard Schacht, Alienation, Garden City: Doubleday, pp. xv-lviii.
Kojeve, Alexander (1980) Introduction to the Reading of Hegel: Lectures on the Phenomenology of Spirit, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
Lefebvre, Henri (1972) Marx, Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.
Lefebvre, Henri (1991) Critique of Everyday Life, London: Verso.
Ludz, Peter C. (1976) ‘Alienation as a Concept in the Social Sciences’, in Felix Geyer and David Schweitzer (eds.), Theories of Alienation, Leiden: Martinus Nijhoff, pp. 3-37.
Lukacs, Gyorgy (1960) Histoire et conscience de classe, Paris: Minuit.
Lukacs, Gyorgy (1971) History and Class Consciousness, Cambridge: MIT Press.
Mattick, Paul (1969) Marx and Keynes, Boston: Extending Horizons Books.
Marcuse, Herbert (1966) Eros and Civilization, Boston: Beacon Press.
Marcuse, Herbert (1972) ‘The Foundation of Historical Materialism’, in Studies in Critical Philosophy, Boston: Beacon Press, pp. 1–49.
Marcuse, Herbert (1973) ‘On the Philosophical Foundation of the Concept of Labor in Economics’, Telos 16, no. 25, pp. 2-37.
Marcuse, Herbert (1931) ‘Zur Kritik der Soziologie’, Die Gesellschaft 8, no. 2, p. 270-280.
Marx, Karl (1942) ‘Comments on James Mill, Éléments d’économie politique’, in Karl Marx, Selected Works, London: Lawrence & Wishart, pp. ??-??.
Marx, Karl (1970) ‘Wage-Labour and Capital’, in Wage-Labour and Capital & Value, Price and Profit, Moscow: Progress Publishers, pp. 15–48.
Marx, Karl (1988a) ‘Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844’, in Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 and the Communist Manifesto, New York: Prometheus Books, pp. 13–168.
Marx, Karl (1988b) ‘Economic Manuscript of 1861-63’, in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 30, London: Lawrence & Wishart, 1988, p. 9–451.
Marx, Karl (1990a) ‘Results of the Immediate Process of Production’, in Karl Marx, Marx, Capital: A Critique of Political Economy, Volume One, London: Penguin Books, pp. 943–1084.
Marx, Karl (1990) Capital: A Critique of Political Economy, Volume One, London: Penguin.
Marx, Karl (1991) Capital: A Critique of Political Economy, Volume Three, London: Penguin.
Marx, Karl (1992a) Capital A Critique of Political Economy, Volume Two, London: Penguin.
Marx, Karl (1992b) ‘A Contribution to the Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy of Right. Introduction’, in Karl Marx, Early Writings, London: Penguin, pp. 243-257.
Marx, Karl (1993) Grundrisse: Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy, London: Penguin.
Marx, Karl (2010a) ‘Value, Price and Profit’, in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 20, London: Lawrence & Wishart, pp. 101–149.
Marx, Karl (2010b) ‘Instructions for the Delegates of the Provisional General Council. The Different Questions’, in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 20, London: Lawrence & Wishart pp. 185–194.
Marx, Karl (2010c) ‘Report of the General Council on the Right of Inheritance’, in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 21, London: Lawrence & Wishart, 65–67.
Marx, Karl (2010d) ‘Critique of the Gotha Program’, in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 24, London: Lawrence & Wishart, 75–99.
Marx, Karl (2010e) ‘Preamble to the Programme of the French Workers’ Party’, in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 24, London: Lawrence & Wishart, 340–342.
McLellan, David (1986) Marx, London: Fontana.
Meiksins Wood, Ellen (1995) Democracy against Capitalism, Cambridge University Press.
Melman, Seymour (1958) Decision-making and Productivity, Oxford: Basil Blackwell.
Mészáros, István (1970) Marx’s Theory of Alienation, London: Merlin Press.
Musto, Marcello (ed.) (2008) Karl Marx’s Grundrisse: Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 years Later, London: Routledge.
Musto, Marcello (2014) ‘Introduction’, in Marcello Musto (ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later, London: Bloomsbury, pp. 1-68.
Musto, Marcello (2015) ‘The Myth of the ‘Young Marx’ in the Interpretations of the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844’, Critique 43, no. 2, pp. 233-60.
Musto, Marcello (2018) Another Marx: Early Manuscripts to the International, London: Bloomsbury.
Musto, Marcello (2020) ‘Communism’, in Marcello Musto (ed.), The Marx Revival: Key Concepts and New Interpretations, Cambridge University Press, pp. 24-50.
Musto, Marcello (2019) Marx’s Capital after 150 Years: Critique and Alternative to Capitalism, London: Routledge.
Nettler, Gwynn (1957) ‘A Measure of Alienation’, American Sociological Review 22, no. 6, pp. 670-677.
Ollman, Bertell (1971) Alienation, New York: Cambridge University Press.
Prawer, Siebert S. (1978) Karl Marx and World Literature, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Rubin, Isaak Illich (1972) Essays on Marx’s Theory of Value, Detroit: Black & Red.
Schacht, Richard (1970) Alienation, Garden City: Doubleday.
Schaff, Adam (1970) Marxism and the Human Individual, New York: McGraw-Hill.
Schaff, Adam (1980) Alienation as a Social Phenomenon, Oxford: Pergamon Press.
Schweitzer, David (1982) ‘Alienation, De-alienation, and Change: A critical overview of current perspectives in philosophy and the social sciences’, in Giora Shoham (ed.) Alienation and Anomie Revisited, Tel Aviv: Ramot, pp. 27-70.
Schweitzer, David (1996) ‘Fetishization of Alienation: Unpacking a Problem of Science, Knowledge, and Reified Practices in the Workplace’, in Felix Geyer (ed.) Alienation, Ethnicity, and Postmodernism, Westport: Greenwood Press, pp. 21-36.
Seeman, Melvin (1959) ‘On the Meaning of Alienation’, American Sociological Review 24, no. 6, pp. 783-791.
Seeman, Melvin (1972) ‘Alienation and Engagement’, in Angus Campbell and Philip E. Converse (eds.), The Meaning of Social Change, New York: Russell Sage, pp. 467-527.
Tucker, Robert (1961) Philosophy and Myth, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Categories
Book chapter

Las investigaciones tardías de Marx sobre los países no europeos

1. Introducción
El examen de los estudios finales de Karl Marx, que prácticamente no han sido explorados, desmiente el mito de que Marx dejó de escribir en sus últimos años.
El período final del trabajo de Marx sin duda fue difícil, pero también fue de gran importancia teórica. A finales de la década de 1870, Marx no solo continuó su trabajo de investigación, sino que lo amplió a nuevas disciplinas. Es más, Marx estudió nuevos conflictos políticos (como la lucha del movimiento populista ruso después de la abolición de la servidumbre de la gleba, o la oposición a la opresión colonialista en la India, Egipto y Argelia), nuevas cuestiones teóricas (tales como las formas de propiedad comunal en las sociedades precapitalistas o la posibilidad de revolución socialista en los países desarrollados de manera no capitalista) y nuevas zonas geográficas (como Rusia, la India o el norte de África). A este período pertenecen no solo sus últimos manuscritos inconclusos sobre El capital sino también varios estudios de la propiedad comunal rural, en particular los pasajes que tratan de la obra de Maksim Kovalevski (1879-80) y el célebre análisis de la obschina en Rusia. Además, Marx escribió los Cuadernos etnológicos (1880-81) y realizó una profunda inmersión final en la historia, en particular la historia de la India y de Europa. Haber investigado todas estas cuestiones le permitió desarrollar conceptos más matizados influidos por las particularidades de los países fuera de la Europa occidental.
Además, este capítulo desafía la duradera y errónea representación de Marx como un pensador economicista y eurocéntrico interesado únicamente en la lucha de clases. Esto permite a los lectores repensar las ideas de Marx a la luz de comentarios tardíos sobre la antropología, las sociedades no occidentales y la crítica del colonialismo europeo, y señala cómo Marx evadió la trampa del determinismo económico en la que cayeron muchos de sus seguidores. Por el contrario, Marx resaltó la especificidad de las condiciones históricas y la centralidad de la intervención humana a la hora de moldear la realidad y posibilitar el cambio.
A pesar de que los estudios teóricos intensivos lo absorbían por completo, Marx nunca dejó de interesarse por los sucesos políticos y económicos internacionales de su época. Además de leer los principales periódicos «burgueses», recibía y leía con regularidad la prensa de clase trabajadora alemana y francesa. Siempre curioso, se mantenía al tanto de lo que ocurría en el mundo. A menudo, su correspondencia con importantes figuras políticas e intelectuales de diversos países le proporcionaba nuevos estímulos y un conocimiento más profundo de una amplia gama de temas.

2. La propiedad de la tierra en los países colonizados
En septiembre de 1879, Marx adquirió y leyó en ruso, con gran interés, Propiedad común de la tierra: Las causas, el curso y las consecuencias de su declive (1879) de Maksim Kovalevski (1851-1916). Los extractos que compiló mayormente provenían de las partes del libro que abordaban la propiedad de la tierra en los países sometidos a la dominación extranjera. Marx resumió las diversas formas en que los españoles en Latinoamérica, los británicos en la India y los franceses en Argelia habían regulado los derechos de posesión.
Al considerar estas tres zonas geográficas, las primeras reflexiones de Marx tuvieron que ver con las civilizaciones precolombinas. Marx observó que, en el comienzo de los imperios azteca e inca, «la población rural mantuvo la propiedad común de la tierra como antes, pero al mismo tiempo tuvo que resignar parte de sus ingresos para efectuar los pagos correspondientes a sus gobernantes». Según Kovalevski, este proceso sentó «las bases del desarrollo de los latifundios a expensas de los intereses propietarios de aquellos que eran dueños de la tierra comunal. Y la llegada de los españoles no hizo más que acelerar la disolución de la tierra comunal». Las terribles consecuencias de su imperio colonial fueron repudiadas tanto por Kovalevski—la «original política de exterminio de los pieles rojas»—como por Marx, que añadió de puño y letra: «después de haber saqueado el oro que encontraron allí, los [españoles] condenaron a los indios a trabajar en las minas». Al final de esta selección de extractos, Marx observó que «la supervivencia (en gran medida) de la comuna rural» se debió, en parte, al hecho de que, «a diferencia de [lo ocurrido] en las Indias Orientales británicas, no existía legislación colonial que regulara la posibilidad de que los integrantes de los clanes vendieran sus tierras».
Más de la mitad de los extractos de Kovalevski de Marx versan sobre la dominación británica de la India. Marx prestó especial atención a la partes del libro que rastreaban formas de propiedad común de la tierra en la India contemporánea, así como también en los tiempos de los rajás hindúes. Utilizando el texto de Kovalevski, observó que la dimensión colectiva permaneció viva incluso después de la parcelización introducida por los británicos: «siguen existiendo entre estos átomos algunas conexiones que guardan una relación distante con los antiguos grupos de propietarios de tierras de las aldeas». A pesar de la hostilidad que compartían respecto del colonialismo británico, Marx se mostró crítico de algunos aspectos del recorrido histórico de Kovalevski, que erróneamente proyectaban los parámetros del contexto europeo en la India. En una serie de comentarios breves pero detallados, Marx le reprochó haber homogeneizado dos fenómenos distintos. Porque, si bien «la distribución de puestos—de ningún modo exclusiva del feudalismo, como demuestra Roma—y la commendatio [existieron] en la India», ello no quería decir que el «feudalismo, tal como se lo conoció en Europa occidental», se hubiese desarrollado allí. Para Marx, Kovalevski había dejado de lado el importante hecho de que la «servidumbre de la gleba» esencial para el feudalismo no existió en la India. Además, dado que «de acuerdo con la ley india, el poder del gobernante no [estaba] sujeto a la repartición entre los hijos varones, [se] obstruyó una gran fuente de feudalismo al estilo europeo». En suma, Marx se mostró muy escéptico ante la posibilidad de transferir categorías de interpretación entre contextos geográficos e históricos completamente diferentes. Más adelante, integró las perspectivas más completas que derivó del texto de Kovalevski mediante su estudio de otros trabajos sobre la historia de la India.
Por último, para el caso de Argelia, Marx no dejó de resaltar la importancia de la propiedad común de la tierra antes de la llegada de los colonos franceses, ni de los cambios que ellos introdujeron. Copió de Kovalevski: «La formación de la propiedad privada de la tierra (a los ojos de los burgueses franceses) es una condición necesaria para que se produzca el progreso en la esfera sociopolítica. La preservación de la propiedad comunal como forma que fomenta las tendencias comunistas en las mentes resulta peligrosa tanto para la colonia como para la metrópolis». Marx también seleccionó los siguientes puntos de Propiedad común de la tierra: Las causas, el curso y las consecuencias de su declive:
…se fomenta e incluso se prescribe la distribución de las posesiones de los clanes, en primer lugar con miras a debilitar a las tribus subyugadas donde nunca falta el impulso de rebelarse; y, en segundo lugar, como única manera de profundizar el traspaso de la propiedad de la tierra de las manos de los nativos a las de los colonizadores. Los franceses han aplicado esta misma política en todos sus regímenes. (…) El objetivo siempre es el mismo: la destrucción de la propiedad colectiva indígena y su transformación en un objeto de libre compra y venta, y por este medio se pretende facilitar su paso a manos de los colonizadores franceses.
En cuanto a la legislación para Argelia propuesta por el republicano de izquierda Jules Warnier (1826-1899) y promulgada en 1873, Marx coincidió con la postura de Kovalevski, que afirmó que el único propósito de dicha medida fue la «expropiación de la tierra de la población nativa por parte de los colonizadores y especuladores europeos». La afronta de los franceses llegó al extremo del «robo propiamente dicho»: la conversión en «propiedad del gobierno» de todas las tierras sin cultivar que hasta entonces los nativos administraban en común. Dicho proceso estaba diseñado para producir otro importante resultado: la eliminación del peligro de resistencia por parte de la población local. Una vez más, en palabras de Kovalevski, Marx señaló:
…la fundación de la propiedad privada y el asentamiento de los colonizadores europeos entre los clanes árabes [se transformaría] en la manera más efectiva de acelerar el proceso de disolución de las uniones entre los clanes. (…) La expropiación de los árabes que buscaba la ley tenía dos objetivos: 1) otorgarles a los franceses la mayor cantidad de tierra posible; y (2) despojar a los árabes de sus lazos naturales con la tierra para destruir la fuerza que les quedaba a las uniones entre los clanes, que así quedarían disueltas, y por consiguiente se disolvería todo riesgo de rebelión..
Marx comentó que este tipo de «individualización de la propiedad de la tierra» no solo había asegurado a los invasores altísimos márgenes económicos sino que además había cumplido «una meta política (…): destruir los cimientos de esta sociedad».
La selección de ideas realizada por Marx, sumada a las escasas pero directas palabras de repudio de las políticas coloniales europeas que añadió a los extractos de Kovalevski, demuestran que se rehusaba a creer que tanto la sociedad india como la argelina estaban destinadas a seguir el mismo camino de desarrollo observado en Europa. A diferencia de Kovalevski, que consideraba que la propiedad de la tierra seguiría los pasos del ejemplo europeo como si de una ley natural se tratase, avanzando, en todas partes, de lo comunal a lo privado, Marx sostenía que, en algunos casos, la propiedad colectiva podría perdurar y que definitivamente no desaparecería a causa de una especie de inevitabilidad histórica.
Después de haber estudiado las formas de la propiedad de la tierra en la India mediante la atenta lectura de la obra de Kovalevski, del otoño de 1879 al verano de 1880 Marx compiló una serie de Cuadernos sobre la historia de la India (664-1858). Dichos compendios, que abarcan más de mil años de historia, fueron extraídos de varios libros, en particular de la Historia analítica de la India (1870), de Robert Sewell (1845-1925), y la Historia de la India (1841) de Mountstuart Elphinstone.
Marx dividió sus notas en cuatro períodos. El primer conjunto comprendía una cronología más bien básica desde la conquista musulmana, que comenzó con la primera penetración árabe en 664, hasta principios del siglo XVI. El segundo conjunto trataba el Imperio mogol, establecido en 1526 por Zahīr ud-Dīn Muhammad y que perduró hasta 1761; también contenía un panorama muy breve de las invasiones extranjeras sufridas por la India y un esquema de cuatro páginas de la actividad mercantil europea entre 1497 y 1702. Del libro de Sewell, Marx transcribió algunos puntos específicos que concernían a Murshid Quli Khan (1660-1727), el primer nabab de Bengala y el arquitecto de un nuevo sistema impositivo, que Marx describió como «un sistema de extorsión y opresión inescrupulosa que creó un amplio excedente [a partir de] los impuestos de Bengala que debidamente se enviaban a Delhi». Según Quli Khan, esa fue la fuente de ganancias que mantuvo a flote el Imperio mogol entero.
El tercer conjunto de notas, que es el más cuantioso, abarca el período de 1725 a 1822, referido a la presencia de la Compañía Británica de las Indias Orientales. En este caso, Marx no se limitó a transcribir los principales sucesos, nombres y fechas, sino que siguió con mayor detalle el curso de los sucesos históricos, en particular aquellos relativos a la dominación británica de la India. El cuarto y último conjunto de notas se aboca a la revuelta de los cipayos en 1857 y el colapso de la Compañía Británica de las Indias Orientales el año siguiente.
En las Notas sobre la historia de la India (664-1858), Marx les dedicó muy poco espacio a sus reflexiones personales, pero sus anotaciones marginales aportan pistas importantes sobre su opinión. Solía describir a los invasores con términos como «perros británicos», «usurpadores», «hipócritas ingleses» o «intrusos ingleses». En cambio, siempre acompañó la lucha de la resistencia india con expresiones de solidaridad. No es casual que Marx reemplazara sistemáticamente el término de Sewell, «amotinados», por la palabra «insurgentes». Su franco repudio del colonialismo europeo resulta inequívoco.
Marx también sostuvo un punto de vista similar en su correspondencia. En una carta escrita a Nikolái Danielson en febrero de 1881, Marx comentó los principales sucesos que estaban teniendo lugar en la India y llegó a predecir que «al gobierno británico le esperaban complicaciones serias o incluso un estallido generalizado». El grado de explotación se había vuelto más y más intolerable:
Lo que los ingleses les sustraen cada año en términos de rentas, dividendos de ferrocarriles inútiles para los hindúes, pensiones para militares y funcionarios civiles, para Afganistán y otras guerras, etcétera, etcétera: lo que les quitan sin ningún equivalente y aparte de todo aquello de lo que se apropian todos los años en la India, contando únicamente el valor de los bienes que los habitantes de la India tienen que enviar a Inglaterra gratuitamente cada año, ¡equivale a una suma mayor al total de los ingresos de 60 millones de trabajadores agrícolas e industriales de la India! ¡Este es un proceso de sangría feroz! ¡Los años de hambruna se acumulan y llegan a una magnitud hasta ahora insospechada en Europa! Existe una verdadera conspiración en la cual cooperan los hindúes y los musulmanes; el gobierno británico es consciente de que se está «cocinando» algo, pero estas personas superficiales (me refiero a los hombres del gobierno), anquilosados por sus propias formas parlamentarias de hablar y pensar, ¡ni siquiera desean percibir con claridad, es decir, tomar conciencia de la total magnitud del peligro inminente! Engañar a los demás y por ese mismo medio engañarse a uno mismo: ¡de eso se trata, en síntesis, la sabiduría parlamentaria! ¡Tanto mejor!
Por último, Marx se ocupó de Australia y se interesó especialmente por la organización social de sus comunidades aborígenes. A partir de «Relato de Australia central» (1880), del etnógrafo Richard Bennett (?), Marx adquirió los conocimientos críticos necesarios para oponerse a quienes alegaban que la sociedad aborigen no poseía leyes ni cultura propios. Además, leyó otros artículos en The Victorian Review relativos al estado de la economía de dicho país, entre ellos «El futuro del comercio australiano» (1880) y «El futuro del noreste australiano» (1880).

3. Rusia y la circunvalación del capitalismo
En sus escritos políticos, Karl Marx siempre había identificado a Rusia como uno de los principales obstáculos a la emancipación de la clase trabajadora europea. Con el transcurso del tiempo, Marx se mantuvo fiel a este juicio. Pero, en sus últimos años, comenzó a cambiar su percepción de Rusia, dado que reconoció en algunos cambios que se estaban produciendo allí posibles condiciones para una transformación social radical. De hecho, Rusia parecía más propensa a generar una revolución que Gran Bretaña, donde, en términos proporcionales, el capitalismo había creado la mayor cantidad de obreros fabriles de todo el mundo, pero a la vez, el movimiento obrero, que accedía a mejores condiciones de vida, en parte gracias a la explotación colonial, se había debilitado y había atravesado el condicionamiento negativo del reformismo sindical.
Marx observó atentamente—y recibió con gran aprobación—los movimientos campesinos rusos que precedieron a la abolición de la servidumbre de la gleba en 1861. A partir de 1870, después de haber aprendido a leer en ruso, Marx se mantuvo al tanto de los acontecimientos mediante la consulta de estadísticas y de textos más completos sobre los cambios socioeconómicos, y también mediante su correspondencia con académicos rusos destacados. Así se produjo un encuentro fundamental con la obra del escritor y filósofo socialista ruso Nikolái Chernishevski (1828-1889); Marx adquirió muchos de sus escritos, y la opinión de la principal figura del populismo ruso [Narodnichestvo] se transformó en una referencia que siempre le resultó útil para su propio análisis de los cambios sociales que se desarrollaban en Rusia. Marx consideraba «excelentes» las obras económicas de Chernishevski y, a principios de 1873, ya profesaba haberse «familiarizado con la mayor parte de sus escritos».
La lectura de Chernishevski fue, para Marx, uno de los principales incentivos para aprender ruso. Al estudiar la obra del autor que él mismo había calificado como «el gran académico y crítico ruso», Marx descubrió ideas originales acerca de la posibilidad de que, en algunas partes del mundo, el desarrollo económico circunvalase el modelo productivo capitalista y las terribles consecuencias sociales que había tenido para la clase trabajadora de Europa occidental. En particular, en su Crítica de los prejuicios filosóficos contra la propiedad comunal de la tierra (1859), Chernishevski se había preguntado «si un fenómeno social cualquiera necesariamente tiene que atravesar todos los momentos lógicos en la vida real de todas las sociedades». Su respuesta fue negativa, y así Chernishevski propuso «dos conclusiones» que ayudaron a definir las demandas políticas de los populistas rusos y a darles un fundamento científico:

  1. El estadio más alto del desarrollo coincide con su origen en términos de forma.
  2. Bajo la influencia del gran desarrollo que ha alcanzado determinado fenómeno de la vida social entre los pueblos más avanzados, el mismo fenómeno puede desarrollarse a gran velocidad en otros pueblos, y así avanzar directamente desde un estadio inferior a uno superior salteándose los momentos lógicos intermedios.

Cabe señalar que las teorías de Chernishevski diferían en gran medida de las de muchos otros pensadores eslavófilos de la época. Sin duda, él compartía con ellos la denuncia de los efectos del capitalismo y la oposición a la proletarización del trabajo rural ruso. Pero se opuso decididamente a la postura de los intelectuales aristocráticos, que ansiaban preservar las estructuras del pasado, y evitó describir la obschina como una modalidad idílica típica y exclusiva de los pueblos eslavos. Es más, no vio motivo para «enorgullecerse de la supervivencia de tales vestigios de antigüedad primitiva». Para Chernishevski, su persistencia en algunos países «solo daba fe de la lentitud y debilidad de la evolución histórica». En las relaciones agrarias, por ejemplo, «la preservación de la propiedad comunal, que en este sentido había desaparecido en otros pueblos» de ningún modo era indicio de superioridad, sino que demostraba que los rusos habían «vivido menos».
Chernishevski tenía la firme convicción de que el desarrollo de Rusia no podía progresar con independencia de los avances logrados en Europa occidental. Las características positivas de la comuna rural debían ser preservadas, pero solo podrían asegurar el bienestar de las masas campesinas si se insertaban en un contexto productivo diferente. La obschina solo podría contribuir a una etapa incipiente de la emancipación social si se transformaba en el embrión de una organización social nueva y radicalmente distinta. La propiedad comunal de la tierra tendría que ser respaldada por una modalidad colectiva de explotación agropecuaria y distribución. Es más, sin los descubrimientos científicos y las adquisiciones tecnológicas asociadas al ascenso del capitalismo, la obschina nunca se transformaría en un experimento de cooperativismo agrícola verdaderamente moderno.
Sobre esta base, los populistas plantearon dos objetivos para su programa: impedir el avance del capitalismo en Rusia y utilizar el potencial emancipatorio de las comunas rurales preexistentes. Chernishevski presentó esta posibilidad mediante una imagen impactante. «La historia», escribió, «como una abuela, le tiene muchísimo cariño a sus nietos más pequeños. A los rezagados no les da los huesos sino la médula, mientras que al tratar de romper los huesos Europa occidental se ha lastimado los dedos terriblemente».
Estudiar la obra de Chernishevski fue muy útil para Marx. En 1881, cuando su creciente interés en las formas comunales arcaicas lo llevó a estudiar a los antropólogos contemporáneos, y al tiempo que sus reflexiones trascendían sin cesar el ámbito europeo, un acontecimiento azaroso lo alentó a profundizar su estudio de Rusia.
A mediados de febrero de 1881, recibió una breve pero intensa y cautivadora carta de Vera Zasulich (1848-1919), una militante populista.
Zasulich, una gran admiradora de Marx, enfatizó que él entendería «mejor que nadie» la urgencia del problema—una «cuestión de vida o muerte» para los revolucionarios rusos—y añadió que «incluso el destino individual de nuestros revolucionarios dependía» de la respuesta de Marx. A continuación, Zasulich resumió los dos puntos de vista diferentes que habían surgido en los debates:
Por un lado, puede que la comuna rural, una vez libre de las exigencias impositivas exorbitantes, los pagos a la nobleza y la administración arbitraria, sea capaz de desarrollarse hacia el socialismo, es decir, de organizar gradualmente su producción y distribución en una modalidad colectiva. En ese caso, el socialista revolucionario debe dedicar todo su esfuerzo a la liberación y el desarrollo de la comuna.
En cambio, si la comuna está destinada a desaparecer, todo lo que le queda al socialista son cálculos, más o menos infundados, relativos a cuántas décadas harán falta para que la tierra de los campesinos rusos pase a manos de la burguesía, y cuántos siglos harán falta para que el capitalismo alcance en Rusia un nivel de desarrollo similar al que ya se logró en Europa occidental. En ese caso, su deber consistirá en ejercer actividades propagandísticas solo entre trabajadores urbanos, trabajadores que, mientras tanto, se ahogarán continuamente en la masa campesina que, después de la disolución de las comunas, se verá obligada a recorrer las calles de las ciudades grandes en busca de un salario.
Zasulich también señaló que algunos participantes del debate afirmaron que «la comuna rural es una forma arcaica condenada a desaparecer por la historia, el socialismo científico y, en resumen, por todo aquello que no amerita debate». Quienes compartían esta postura se autodenominaban los «discípulos [de Marx] por excelencia»: los «marxistas». Su principal argumento solía ser: «Marx lo dijo».
La pregunta planteada por Zasulich llegó en el momento justo, precisamente cuando a Marx lo absorbía el estudio de las comunidades precapitalistas. Así, el mensaje de Zasulich lo indujo a analizar un caso histórico real de gran relevancia contemporánea y de estrecha relación con sus intereses teóricos en esa época. La complejidad de su respuesta solo puede ser plenamente apreciada si se tiene en cuenta el contexto de sus reflexiones sobre el capitalismo y la transición al socialismo.
La convicción de que la expansión del modelo productivo capitalista es un requisito sine qua non para el nacimiento de la sociedad comunista atraviesa la totalidad de la obra de Marx.
En la sección de El capital, volumen uno, titulada «Tendencia histórica de la acumulación capitalista», Marx resumió las seis condiciones generadas por el capitalismo—en particular, por su centralización—que constituyen los prerrequisitos básicos para el nacimiento de la sociedad comunista. Son las siguientes: 1) el proceso de trabajo cooperativo; 2) los aportes científico-tecnológicos a la producción; 3) la apropiación de las fuerzas de la naturaleza por parte de producción; 4) la creación de maquinaria que los trabajadores solo pueden operar de manera conjunta; 5) la economización de todos los medios de producción; y 6) la tendencia a la creación de un mercado mundial. Para Marx:
De la mano (…) de esta expropiación de muchos capitalistas por parte de unos pocos, se producen otros acontecimientos en una escala cada vez mayor, como el crecimiento de las formas cooperativas del proceso de trabajo, la aplicación técnica y consciente de la ciencia, la cultivación metódica de la tierra, la transformación de los instrumentos de trabajo en otros únicamente utilizables de manera conjunta, la economización de todos los medios de producción mediante su uso en el trabajo combinado y socializado, la captación de todos los pueblos en la red del mercado mundial y, por ende, el carácter internacional del régimen capitalista.
Marx estaba convencido de que «los elementos [necesarios] para la conformación de una sociedad nueva» maduran junto con «las condiciones materiales y la combinación de los procesos productivos en el plano social». Dichas «premisas materiales» resultan decisivas para el logro de una «síntesis mayor a futuro», y si bien la revolución nunca surge únicamente de dinámicas económicas sino que también requiere siempre algún factor político, el advenimiento del comunismo «exige a la sociedad cierta base material, o bien un conjunto de condiciones de existencia que, a su vez, son el producto espontáneo de un largo y doloroso proceso de desarrollo».
Algunas ideas similares, que confirman la continuidad del pensamiento de Marx, se encuentran en algunos escritos breves pero significativos, de carácter político, que produjo después de El capital. Por ejemplo, en la Crítica del programa de Gotha (1875), profundizó sus argumentos sobre la necesidad de «probar de manera concreta cómo la sociedad capitalista actual por fin ha creado las condiciones materiales, etcétera, que permiten y conminan a los trabajadores a deshacer esta maldición histórica».
Marx, que nunca mostró deseos de pronosticar cómo debería ser el socialismo, tampoco afirmó nunca, en sus reflexiones sobre el capitalismo, que la sociedad humana estuviese destinada a seguir el mismo camino o atravesar las mismas etapas en todas partes. No obstante, se vio obligado a confrontar la tesis, que falsamente se le atribuía, de que la modalidad productiva burguesa constituía una inevitabilidad histórica en todo el mundo. Este punto se evidencia con claridad en la controversia sobre la posibilidad del desarrollo capitalista en Rusia.
Se presume que, en noviembre de 1877, Marx había escrito el borrador de una larga carta a la redacción de Notas patrióticas [Otechestvennye Zapiski], donde se proponía responder a un artículo sobre el futuro de la comuna rural (obschina) en Rusia—«Karl Marx ante el tribunal del Sr. Zhukovsky»—escrito por el crítico literario y sociólogo Nikolái Mijailovski. Marx reescribió la carta un par de veces, pero al final la dejó en formato borrador, con eliminaciones visibles, y nunca la mandó. Sin embargo, el texto contiene algunos interesantes adelantos de los argumentos que Marx emplearía más adelante en su respuesta a Zasulich.
En una serie de ensayos, Mijailovski había planteado una pregunta muy similar, al margen de sus sutilezas, a la que se haría Zasulich cuatro años después. Para Zasulich, el quid de la cuestión era el impacto que tendrían los posibles cambios de la comuna rural en la actividad propagandística del movimiento socialista. Mijailovski, por su parte, se interesó por discutir en un plano más teórico las diversas posturas posibles en cuanto al futuro de la obschina, que incluían desde la tesis de los economistas liberales de que Rusia simplemente tenía que deshacerse de la obschina y adoptar un régimen capitalista hasta el argumento de que la comuna podría seguir desarrollándose y evitar los efectos negativos que acarreaba el modelo productivo capitalista para la población rural.
A diferencia de Zasulich, que se acercó a Marx para conocer su opinión y para recibir indicaciones relativas a acciones concretas, Mijailovski, representante destacado del ala más moderada y liberal del populismo ruso, claramente favorecía la segunda tesis y creía que Marx prefería la primera. Zasulich escribió que los «marxistas» proclamaban que el desarrollo del capitalismo era indispensable, pero Mijailovski fue un paso más allá y afirmó que el autor de esa tesis había sido el propio Marx en El capital. Mijailovski escribió:
Todavía tenemos presentes todas estas «mutilaciones de mujeres y niños» y, desde el punto de vista de la teoría histórica de Marx, no deberíamos protestar porque ello implicaría perjudicarnos a nosotros mismos. (…) El discípulo ruso de Marx (…) ha de limitarse a ejercer el papel de observador. (…) Si realmente comparte la postura histórico-filosófica de Marx, debería complacerse de ver a los productores divorciados de los medios de producción y debería tratar este divorcio como la primera fase de un proceso inevitable cuyo resultado, a la larga, será provechoso. En otras palabras, debe aceptar la destitución de los principios inherentes a su ideal. Dicha colisión entre el sentimiento moral y la inevitabilidad histórica debe resolverse, por supuesto, a favor de la segunda.
Pero Mijailovski fue incapaz de respaldar estas afirmaciones con citas precisas y, en cambio, citó la referencia polémica a Herzen efectuada por Marx. En la carta a Otechestvennye Zapiski, Marx fue contundente al declarar que no se podía tomar su polémica con Herzen por una falsificación de sus propios juicios, o bien, como había afirmado Mijailovski, por una desestimación de «los esfuerzos del pueblo ruso por encontrar un camino de desarrollo nacional diferente al camino por el que ha avanzado y avanza todavía Europa occidental». Marx pretendía «hablar sin tapujos» y expresar las conclusiones a las que había arribado después de muchos años de estudio. Comenzó con la siguiente oración, que después tachó en el manuscrito: «si Rusia continúa por la senda que viene siguiendo desde 1861, perderá la mejor oportunidad histórica que se le haya presentado a un pueblo y atravesará todas las fatídicas vicisitudes del régimen capitalista».
La primera aclaración clave de Marx tiene que ver con las áreas a las que se había referido en su análisis. Señaló que, en la sección de El capital titulada «La acumulación “primitiva”», había intentado describir cómo «la disolución de la estructura económica de la sociedad feudal» desbloqueó los componentes de «la estructura económica de la sociedad capitalista» en «Europa occidental». Por ende, el proceso no ocurrió en todo el mundo, sino solo en el Viejo Continente.
Marx se refirió a un pasaje de la edición francesa de El capital (1872-75) donde él había afirmado que la base de la separación de los productores y los medios de producción era la «expropiación de los productores agrícolas» y había agregado que «solo en Inglaterra [se había] logrado de manera radical» pero que «todos los otros países de Europa occidental [estaban] siguiendo sus pasos».
En lo que a Rusia respecta, en la «Carta a la redacción de Otechestvennye Zapiski», Marx compartía la visión de Mijailovski de que Rusia podría «desarrollar sus propias bases históricas y así, evitando todas las torturas del régimen [capitalista], apropiarse de sus frutos de todas maneras». Pero acusó a Mijailovski de «transformar [su] relato histórico de la génesis del capitalismo en Europa occidental en una teoría histórico-filosófica del curso general que se impondría fatalmente a todos los pueblos, sin importar las circunstancias históricas en las que se encontraran».
Para continuar su argumento, Marx subrayó que, en el análisis de El capital, la tendencia histórica de la producción capitalista residía en el hecho de que «creaba los componentes de un nuevo orden económico y les otorgaba el mayor ímpetu posible a las fuerzas productivas del trabajo social y al desarrollo cabal de cada productor individual»; en rigor, «ya descansaba sobre un modelo colectivo de producción» y «no le quedaba otra alternativa que transformarse en propiedad social».
Entonces, Mijailovski solo podía aplicar este recorrido histórico a Rusia de la siguiente manera: si Rusia tendía a transformarse en «una nación capitalista como las de Europa occidental»—y, según Marx, ya había estado avanzando en esa dirección en los años anteriores—no lo lograría «sino después de haber transformado a gran parte de sus campesinos en proletarios»; más adelante, una vez subsumida dentro de la órbita del régimen capitalista, Rusia [quedaría] sujeta a sus impiadosas leyes, al igual que otros pueblos profanos».
Lo que más le molestó a Marx fue la idea de que su crítico se había propuesto «transformar [su] relato histórico de la génesis del capitalismo en Europa occidental en una teoría histórico-filosófica del curso general que se impondría fatalmente a todos los pueblos, sin importar las circunstancias históricas en las que [se encontraran] insertos». Con un toque de sarcasmo, añadió: «Pero le pido disculpas. Eso implicaría honrarme y desacreditarme demasiado a la vez».
Así, Mijailovski, que no conocía bien la postura teórica real de Marx, la criticó de tal manera que pareció anticiparse a uno de los puntos cruciales del marxismo del siglo XX, que ya se estaba propagando insidiosamente entre los seguidores de Marx en Rusia y en otras partes del mundo. La crítica de Marx a esta conceptualización resultó doblemente importante porque tuvo que ver no solo con el presente sino también con el futuro. No obstante, nunca la publicó, y la idea de que Marx consideraba al capitalismo una etapa obligatoria también para Rusia se afianzó enseguida y tuvo consecuencias serias para lo que se transformaría en el marxismo ruso.

4. La carta a Zasulich (y sus borradores)
Con su carta a Zasulich ocurrió algo similar. Durante casi tres semanas, Marx estuvo absorto en sus papeles, plenamente consciente de que tenía que responder a una pregunta teórica de gran relevancia y expresar su postura sobre una cuestión política crucial. Los frutos de su trabajo fueron cuatro borradores—tres de ellos, muy extensos y, por momentos, contradictorios—y la respuesta que, finalmente, le envió a Zasulich.
En el primero de los cuatro borradores, que es el más extenso, Marx analizó lo que consideraba el «único argumento serio» para afirmar que la «disolución de la comuna campesina rusa» sería inevitable. «Si se retrocede bastante en el tiempo, es posible encontrar diversos tipos más o menos arcaicos de propiedad comunal en toda Europa occidental; en todas partes, ha desaparecido a medida que se profundiza el progreso social. ¿Por qué Rusia sería la única excepción a ese destino?» En su respuesta, Marx repitió que «tendría en cuenta ese argumento solamente en lo que concernía a las experiencias europeas en las que se basaba». Y en cuanto a Rusia:
Para que la producción capitalista pueda establecerse e imperar en Rusia, la gran mayoría de los campesinos, es decir, del pueblo ruso, tendrán que convertirse en asalariados y, en consecuencia, sufrir la expropiación mediante la abolición previa de su propiedad comunista. Pero, en cualquier caso, ¡el precedente occidental no probaría nada de nada!
Marx no descartó la posibilidad de que la comuna rural se disolviera y concluyera su larga existencia. Pero si eso ocurriera, no sería a causa de una predestinación histórica. En referencia a quienes se autodenominaban seguidores suyos y aducían que el advenimiento del capitalismo era inevitable, Marx le comentó a Zasulich, con su sarcasmo habitual: «Los “marxistas” rusos de los que habla me resultan totalmente desconocidos. Hasta donde yo sé, los rusos con los que yo tengo trato personal tienen una visión diametralmente opuesta».
Estas referencias constantes a las experiencias occidentales estaban acompañadas de una observación política muy valiosa. Si bien a principios de los años cincuenta, en su artículo para el New-York Tribune «Futuros resultados de la dominación británica en la India» (1853), Marx había afirmado que «Inglaterra debe cumplir una doble misión en la India: una destructiva y la otra regeneradora: la aniquilación de la antigua sociedad asiática y el asentamiento de las bases materiales de la sociedad occidental en Asia», en sus reflexiones sobre Rusia se produjo un cambio de perspectiva manifiesto.
Ya en 1853, había evitado autoengañarse en cuanto a las características básicas del capitalismo; sabía bien que la burguesía nunca «había progresado sin arrastrar a los individuos y las personas por la sangre y la mugre, la miseria y la degradación». Pero también se había mostrado convencido de que, mediante el comercio mundial, el desarrollo de las fuerzas productivas y la transformación de la producción en algo científicamente capaz de dominar a las fuerzas de la naturaleza, «la industria y el comercio burgueses [habían] creado las condiciones materiales de un mundo nuevo».
Algunas lecturas superficiales o limitadas han tomado esta idea como evidencia del eurocentrismo u orientalismo de Marx, pero, en realidad, es tan solo el reflejo de la visión parcial e ingenua del colonialismo de un joven de apenas treinta y cinco años escribiendo un artículo periodístico. En ninguna parte de la obra de Marx se sugiere siquiera una distinción esencialista entre las sociedades de Oriente y Occidente.
En 1881, después de tres décadas de profunda investigación teórica y de atenta observación de los cambios de la política internacional, sin mencionar sus extensísimas sinopsis en los Cuadernos etnológicos, tenía una visión bastante diferente de la transición desde las formas comunales del pasado hasta el capitalismo. Así, al referirse a las «Indias Orientales», expresó: «Todos menos sir Henry Maine y otros de su calaña son conscientes de que la supresión de la propiedad comunal de la tierra allí no fue más que un acto de vandalismo inglés, que no llevó al progreso de los nativos, sino a su atraso». Lo único que los británicos «lograron fue arruinar la agricultura nativa y duplicar la cantidad de hambrunas y su gravedad».
En consecuencia, la obschina no estaba predestinada a sufrir el mismo destino que otras formas similares de Europa occidental en siglos anteriores, donde «la transición de una sociedad fundada en la propiedad comunal a una sociedad fundada en la propiedad privada» había sido más o menos uniforme. Ante la pregunta de si era inevitable que lo propio ocurriera en Rusia, Marx, tajante, respondió: «Para nada».
Así, para Marx, el campesinado «puede incorporar las adquisiciones positivas ideadas por el sistema capitalista sin pasar por sus horcas caudinas». En respuesta a quienes negaban la posibilidad de saltear fases y veían al capitalismo como una etapa inevitable también para Rusia, Marx se preguntó, con ironía, si Rusia había tenido que «atravesar un largo período de incubación de la industria de la ingeniería (…) para poder utilizar las máquinas, los motores a vapor, los ferrocarriles, etcétera». Del mismo modo, ¿no había sido posible «introducir, en un abrir y cerrar de ojos, el mecanismo de intercambio completo (bancos, entidades de crédito, etcétera) que Occidente había ideado a lo largo de varios siglos?»
Marx criticó el «aislamiento» de las comunas agrícolas arcaicas, puesto que, al estar encerradas en sí mismas y no tener contacto con el mundo exterior, eran, en términos políticos, la forma económica que mejor se adecuaba al reaccionario régimen zarista: «la falta de conexión entre la vida de una comuna y la de las demás, este microcosmos localizado, […] siempre da lugar al surgimiento de despotismo centralizado que supera y domina a las comunas».
Definitivamente, Marx no había alterado su complejo juicio crítico de las comunas rurales rusas, y en su análisis la importancia del desarrollo individual y la producción social permaneció intacta. No es que de pronto se haya convencido de que las comunas rurales arcaicas eran un foco de emancipación más avanzado para el individuo que las relaciones sociales que existían dentro del capitalismo. Ambas posibilidades distaban mucho de su concepción de la sociedad comunista.
En los borradores de la carta de Marx a Zasulich no existe el menor indicio del quiebre dramático con sus posturas anteriores que han detectado algunos académicos. En concordancia con sus principios teóricos, Marx no sugirió que Rusia u otros países donde el capitalismo todavía estaba infradesarrollado tuviesen que transformarse en el foco primordial de un estallido revolucionario; ni tampoco pensaba que los países con un capitalismo más atrasado estuviesen más cerca del objetivo del comunismo que aquellos caracterizados por un desarrollo productivo más avanzado. En su opinión, no se debían confundir las rebeliones o luchas por la resistencia esporádicas con el establecimiento de un nuevo orden socioeconómico basado en el comunismo. La posibilidad que él había considerado en un momento muy particular de la historia de Rusia, cuando se dieron condiciones favorables para una transformación progresiva de las comunas agrarias, no podía elevarse al estatus de modelo general.
Ni en la Argelia dominada por los franceses ni en la India británica, por ejemplo, se observaban las condiciones especiales que Chernishevski había identificado, y la Rusia de principios de la década de 1880 no podía compararse con lo que pudiese llegar a ocurrir allí en tiempos futuros. El nuevo elemento en el pensamiento de Marx consistió en una apertura teórica cada vez mayor, que le permitió considerar otros caminos posibles al socialismo que anteriormente no había tomado en serio o que había considerado inalcanzables.
Lo que escribió Marx es muy similar a lo que había escrito Chernishevski antes que él. Esta alternativa era posible y, sin duda, se adecuaba mejor al contexto socioeconómico ruso que «la actividad agropecuaria capitalizada según el modelo inglés». Pero solo podría sobrevivir si «el trabajo colectivo reemplazaba el trabajo por parcelas, el origen de la apropiación privada». Para que ello ocurriera, hacían falta dos cosas: «la necesidad económica de que se produjera semejante cambio y las condiciones materiales necesarias para hacerlo realidad». La contemporaneidad de la comuna agrícola rusa con el capitalismo en Europa le proporcionaba «todas las condiciones necesarias para el trabajo colectivo», al tiempo que la familiaridad de los campesinos con el artel facilitaría la transición hacia el «trabajo cooperativo».
Marx volvió a tratar temas similares en 1882. En enero, en el «Prefacio a la segunda edición rusa del Manifiesto del partido comunista», que coescribió con Engels, se establece un vínculo entre el destino de la comuna rural rusa y el de las luchas proletarias en Europa occidental:
En Rusia, cara a cara con el veloz desarrollo de la estafa capitalista y con los bienes raíces burgueses, que apenas están empezando a desarrollarse, observamos que más de la mitad de la tierra está en manos de los campesinos, que la administran en común. Ahora bien, la pregunta es: la obschina rusa, una forma primigenia de propiedad común de la tierra, ¿puede, a pesar de encontrarse muy debilitada, convertirse directamente en una forma superior, la propiedad común comunista? ¿O, por el contrario, primero debe atravesar el mismo proceso de disolución que constituye el desarrollo histórico de Occidente? Hoy en día, la única respuesta posible es la siguiente: si la Revolución rusa se transforma en una señal para la revolución proletaria en Occidente, de modo tal que ambas se complementen mutuamente, la propiedad común de la tierra que hoy en día se observa en Rusia podría constituir el punto de partida del desarrollo comunista.
La tesis básica que Marx ya había expresado en muchas ocasiones anteriores seguía siendo la misma, pero ahora sus ideas se relacionaban más estrechamente con el contexto histórico y con los diversos escenarios políticos que posibilitaban.
Las consideraciones de alta densidad argumental de Marx sobre el futuro de la obschina se encuentran en las antípodas de la equiparación del socialismo con las fuerzas productivas, una concepción marcada por tintes nacionalistas y simpatías colonialistas que se hizo presente en la Segunda Internacional y los partidos socialdemócratas. También difieren en gran medida del supuesto «método científico» de análisis social preponderante en el movimiento comunista internacional del siglo XX.

5. Los Extractos cronológicos y los últimos intereses políticos de la década de 1880: Una perspectiva global
Entre el otoño de 1881 y el invierno de 1882, gran parte de la energía intelectual de Marx se canalizó en los estudios históricos. Trabajó de manera intensiva en los Extractos cronológicos, una línea de tiempo comentada que registra acontecimientos globales año a año desde el primer siglo AC en adelante y resume sus causas y características principales.
Para descubrir si sus conceptos estaban bien fundamentados, Marx quería ponerlos a prueba a la luz de los grandes acontecimientos políticos, militares, económicos y tecnológicos del pasado. Hacía tiempo ya que era consciente de que el esquema de progresión lineal a lo largo de «las modalidades de producción asiáticas, antiguas, feudales y burguesas modernas» que había trazado en el Prefacio a Contribución a la crítica de la economía política (1859) resultaba totalmente inadecuado para comprender el movimiento de la historia, y entendía que, de hecho, era aconsejable alejarse de la filosofía de la historia en todas sus formas. Su frágil estado de salud le impidió reencontrarse con los manuscritos inconclusos de El capital. Probablemente haya pensado que había llegado el momento de volver a ocuparse de la historia mundial y, en particular, de una cuestión central: la relación entre el desarrollo del capitalismo y el nacimiento de los Estados modernos..
Para su cronología, Marx mayormente consultó dos textos. El primero fue la Historia de los pueblos de Italia (1825), del historiador italiano Carlo Botta (1766–1837), y el segundo fue la muy difundida y consagrada Historia mundial para el pueblo alemán (1844-57), de Friedrich Schlosser (1776-1861), que en su época había sido considerado el historiador alemán más destacado. Marx llenó cuatro gruesos cuadernos de notas sobre esas dos obras redactadas en una letra apenas legible y más pequeña de lo normal. Las tapas llevan los títulos que les dio Engels cuando se dedicó a catalogar las posesiones de su amigo: «Extractos cronológicos. I: 96 a c. 1320; II: c. 1300 a c. 1470; III: c. 1470 a c. 1580; IV: c. 1580 a c. 1648». En algunos casos, Marx agregó consideraciones críticas sobre figuras significativas o propuso su propia interpretación de sucesos históricos importantes, por lo cual podemos inferir que no estaba de acuerdo con la fe en el progreso de Schlosser y sus juicios morales. Esta reinmersión en la historia no se limitó a Europa, sino que se extendió a Asia, el Medio Oriente, el mundo islámico y América.
En el primer cuaderno dedicado a los Extractos cronológicos, y mayormente basándose en Botta, Marx llenó 143 páginas con una cronología de algunos de los principales acontecimientos ocurridos entre 91 AC y 1370 DC. Empezó por la antigua Roma y más adelante estudió la caída del Imperio romano, el surgimiento de Francia, la importancia histórica de Carlomagno (742-814), el Imperio bizantino y las diversas manifestaciones y características del feudalismo.
Marx señaló atentamente todo lo que pudiese resultarle útil a fin de analizar sistemas impositivos en diversos países y épocas. También se interesó vivamente por el significativo rol de Sicilia, ubicada en los márgenes de Europa y del mundo árabe, y por las repúblicas marítimas italianas y su importante aporte al desarrollo del capitalismo mercantil. Por último, gracias a la consulta de otros libros que lo ayudaron a integrar la información provista por Botta, Marx escribió muchas páginas de notas sobre la conquista islámica de África y Oriente, las Cruzadas y los califatos de Bagdad y Mosul.
En el segundo cuaderno, que comprende 145 páginas relativas al período que va de 1308 a 1469, Marx siguió transcribiendo notas sobre las últimas cruzadas a la «Tierra Santa». No obstante, una vez más, la parte más extensa tiene que ver con las repúblicas marítimas italianas y los avances económicos en Italia, que Marx consideraba el principio del capitalismo moderno. Basándose también en Maquiavelo, Marx resumió los principales sucesos de las luchas políticas de la República de Florencia. Al mismo tiempo, a raíz de la lectura de la Historia mundial para el pueblo alemán, de Schlosser, Marx reflexionó sobre la situación política y económica de Alemania en los siglos XIV y XV, así como también sobre la historia del Imperio mongol durante la vida de Genghis Khan y en la etapa posterior.
En el tercer cuaderno, que posee 141 páginas, Marx se ocupó de los principales conflictos políticos y religiosos entre 1470 y c. 1580. Se interesó particularmente por el choque de Francia y España, los tumultuosos conflictos dinásticos de la monarquía inglesa y la vida e influencia de Girolamo Savonarola (1452-1498). Por supuesto, también rastreó la historia de la Reforma protestante y subrayó el apoyo que recibió de la emergente clase burguesa.
Finalmente, en el último cuaderno, de 117 páginas, Marx se concentró sobre todo en los numerosos conflictos religiosos en Europa entre 1580 y 1648. La sección más larga se ocupa de Alemania antes del estallido de la guerra de los Treinta Años (1618-1648) y analiza este período en profundidad. Marx reflexionó sobre el papel del rey sueco Gustavo II Adolfo (1594-1632), el cardenal Richelieu (1585-1642) y el cardenal Mazarino (1602-1661). La sección final está dedicada a Inglaterra y describe la muerte de Isabel I (1533-1603).
Además de los cuatro cuadernos de extractos de Botta y Schlosser, Marx compiló otro cuaderno con las mismas características, contemporáneo con los demás y relacionado con la misma investigación. En este caso, basándose en la Historia de la República de Florencia (1875) de Gino Capponi (1792-1876), Marx complementó el conocimiento que ya había adquirido sobre la etapa de 1135 a 1433. También compiló algunas notas más sobre el período que va de 449 a 1485 sobre la base de la Historia del pueblo inglés (1877) de John Green (1837-1883). Sin embargo, las fluctuaciones de su estado de salud no le permitieron seguir avanzando. Sus notas se acaban en las crónicas de la Paz de Westfalia, que terminó con la guerra de los Treinta Años en 1648.
A pesar de que Europa, lógicamente, ocupa un lugar central en estos estudios, los cuatro cuadernos utilizados durante este período contienen varias referencias a países no europeos. Al igual que sus estudios económicos, la investigación de Marx no se preocupaba solo por el Viejo Continente.
Es probable que Marx haya abandonado el proyecto de completar los Extractos cronológicos debido a los graves problemas de salud que lo aquejaban; en febrero de 1882, sus amigos y sus médicos lo convencieron de visitar Argel para curarse de una bronquitis grave. Este fue el único período de su vida que pasó fuera de Europa. Hubo muchos sucesos desfavorables que impidieron que Marx lograra conocer en profundidad la realidad argelina; y—como había anticipado Engels—tampoco le fue posible estudiar las características de «la propiedad común entre los árabes». Pero Marx realizó algunas observaciones interesantes durante los 72 días que vivió cerca del margen sur del Mediterráneo. Las que realmente se destacan son las que se ocupan de las relaciones sociales entre los musulmanes. Por ejemplo, Marx se maravilló de la escasa presencia del Estado:
«En ninguna otra ciudad que constituya a la vez la sede del gobierno central existe semejante laisser faire, laisser passer; la policía se reduce a un mínimo indispensable; la falta de humillación pública no tiene parangón; el responsable de esto es el elemento morisco. Para los musulmanes la subordinación no existe; ellos no son ni “súbditos” ni “ciudadanos” [administrés]; no existe la autoridad, excepto en la política, algo que los europeos han sido completamente incapaces de entender».
Marx atacó con desprecio los maltratos violentos y las provocaciones constantes de los europeos y, en especial, su «desvergonzada arrogancia y presunción en el trato con las “razas inferiores”, [y] una espantosa obsesión al estilo Moloch con la penitencia» respecto de cualquier acto de rebelión. También enfatizó que, en la historia comparada de la ocupación colonial, «los británicos y holandeses superan a los franceses». En la propia Argel, según le informó a Engels, su amigo, el juez Fermé, a lo largo de su carrera había observado con regularidad «un tipo de tortura (…) pensada para extraer confesiones a los árabes, llevada a cabo, por supuesto, (…) por la “policía” (como los ingleses en la India)».
«Por ejemplo, cuando una pandilla árabe comete un homicidio, en general con vistas a algún robo, y con el tiempo se arresta, enjuicia y ejecuta a los malhechores correspondientes con todas las de la ley, la familia del colonizador damnificado no lo considera penitencia suficiente. Como si esto fuera poco, exigen que también se “detenga” a por lo menos media docena de árabes inocentes. (…) Cuando un colonizador europeo vive entre las “razas inferiores”, ya sea como colono o simplemente para hacer negocios, suele autopercibirse como un sujeto más inviolable que el apuesto Guillermo I».
La firme postura anticolonialista de Marx en cuanto a Argelia no constituía un caso aislado. En la guerra de 1882, donde las fuerzas egipcias comandadas por Ahmad Urabi (1841-1911) se enfrentaron a las tropas del Reino Unido, Marx no dejó de criticar a quienes fueron incapaces de sostener una postura de clase autónoma, y advirtió que era absolutamente necesario que los trabajadores se opusieran a las instituciones y la retórica del Estado. Cuando Joseph Cowen (1829-1900), legislador y presidente del Congreso Cooperativo—Marx lo consideraba «el mejor de los parlamentarios ingleses»—justificó la invasión británica de Egipto, Marx expresó su desaprobación total. Por sobre todas las cosas, despotricó contra el gobierno británico: «¡Qué bien! En rigor, no puede haber un ejemplo más flagrante de la hipocresía cristiana que la “conquista” de Egipto: ¡conquista en tiempos de paz!»
Pero Cowen, en un discurso que pronunció el 8 de enero de 1883 en Newcastle, expresó su admiración por la «proeza heroica» de los británicos y «el esplendor de nuestro despliegue militar»; y no pudo «evitar sonreír al pensar en la fascinante perspectiva de todas esas posiciones ofensivas fortificadas entre el Atlántico y el océano Índico y, por si fuera poco, un “imperio afrobritánico” desde el Delta hasta el Cabo». Así era el «estilo inglés», caracterizado por la «responsabilidad» relativa a los «intereses internos». En términos de política extranjera, concluyó Marx, Cowen representaba un ejemplo típico de «esos pobres burgueses británicos que refunfuñan cuando asumen más y más “responsabilidades” al servicio de su misión histórica, al mismo tiempo que protestan en vano contra ella».
Marx también siguió con atención el aspecto económico de lo que ocurría en Egipto, como se observa en las ocho páginas que dedicó a extractos de «Finanzas egipcias» (1882), un artículo de Michael George Mulhall (1836-1900) que apareció en el número de octubre de la Contemporary Review de Londres. Sus notas se concentraron en dos aspectos. Por un lado, documentó el chantaje financiero llevado a cabo por los acreedores anglo-alemanes después de que el virrey otomano de Egipto, Ismail Pasha (1830-1895), sumiera al país en una deuda dramática. Es más, Marx describió el opresivo sistema impositivo ideado por Ismail Pasha, que demandaba un altísimo precio a la población, y observó con particular atención y solidaridad el desplazamiento forzoso de muchos campesinos egipcios.

6. Conclusiones
En sus últimos años, Marx se ocupó en profundidad de muchas otras cuestiones que, aunque suelen ser subestimadas o incluso ignoradas por académicos dedicados a su obra, están adquiriendo una importancia crucial en la agenda política de nuestros tiempos. Entre ellas se encuentran la libertad individual en la esfera política y económica, la emancipación de los géneros, la crítica del nacionalismo, el potencial emancipador de la tecnología y las formas de propiedad colectiva no controladas por el Estado.
Asimismo, Marx emprendió estudios exhaustivos de sociedades no europeas y se expresó categóricamente en contra de la devastación del colonialismo. Es un error sugerir lo contrario. Marx criticó a los pensadores que resaltaban las consecuencias destructivas del colonialismo y al mismo tiempo aplicaban categorías específicas del contexto europeo a sus análisis de áreas periféricas. Varias veces advirtió acerca de aquellos que no respetaron las distinciones necesarias entre los fenómenos; y, en particular, después de sus avances teóricos de la década de 1870, supo desconfiar, en gran medida, de la transferencia de categorías interpretativas entre etapas históricas o áreas geográficas completamente diferentes. Hoy en día no caben dudas sobre este punto, a pesar del escepticismo que aún está en boga en ciertos sectores académicos.
Así, treinta años después de la caída del muro de Berlín, se ha vuelto posible leer a un Marx muy diferente al teórico dogmático, economicista y eurocéntrico que durante tanto tiempo se presentó ante el mundo. Los últimos avances que se han logrado en los estudios marxistas apuntan a la probabilidad de que la exégesis de su obra se vuelva más y más refinada. Desde este punto de vista, los temas que abordó Marx durante esos años ofrecen a los lectores contemporáneos un amplio marco para la reflexión sobre las preguntas urgentes de la actualidad. Durante mucho tiempo, muchos marxistas priorizaron los escritos de juventud de Marx (principalmente los Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844 y La ideología alemana), al tiempo que el Manifiesto del Partido Comunista siguió siendo su texto más leído y citado. No obstante, en esos escritos tempranos se encuentran muchas ideas que fueron superadas en obras posteriores. Y, sobre todo, es en El capital y en sus borradores preliminares, así como también en los estudios de sus últimos años, donde encontramos las reflexiones más valiosas sobre la crítica de la sociedad burguesa. Dichas ideas representan las últimas conclusiones a las que Marx llegó, aunque no sean las definitivas. Si se las examina con ojo crítico a la luz de los cambios ocurridos en el mundo desde su muerte, puede que todavía resulten muy útiles para la tarea de teorizar un modelo socioeconómico alternativo al capitalismo.

 

1. A fin de concentrarnos exclusivamente en los estudios de Marx sobre los «países no europeos», los Cuadernos etnológicos no se analizarán en este capítulo.
2. Véase Lawrence Krader, The Asiatic Mode of Production: Sources, Development and Critique in the Writings of Karl Marx (Assen: Van Gorcum, 1975), 343.
3. Karl Marx, «Exzerpte aus M. M. Kovalevskij: Obschinnoe zemlevladenie», en Karl Marx, Über Formen vorkapitalistischer Produktion. Vergleichende Studien zur Geschichte des Grundeigentums 1879-80 (Frankfurt: Campus, 1977), 28. Parte de las notas de Marx que tienen que ver con Kovalevski, que incluyen algunas de las citas provistas en el presente texto, todavía no han sido traducidas al inglés.
4. Ibid., 29.
5. Ibid., 38. Kevin Anderson, Marx at the Margins. On Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Non-Western Societies (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010), ha sugerido que la diferencia con la India se debe, en parte, al hecho de que «la India fue colonizada en un período posterior por un poder capitalista avanzado, Gran Bretaña, que intentó activamente crear propiedad privada individual en las aldeas» (ibid., 223-4).
6. Marx, «Excerpts from M. M. Kovalevsky», 388; «Exzerpte aus M. M. Kovalevskij», 82. Las palabras añadidas por Marx se indican entre corchetes. Kevin Anderson, en Marx at the Margins, las relacionó con la importancia, para Marx, de las «formas comunales de la India» como «posibles focos de resistencia al colonialismo y el capital» (ibid., 233).
7. El acto por el cual un hombre libre asume una relación de dependencia (que conlleva ciertas obligaciones en términos de servicio) con un poder superior a cambio de «protección» o del reconocimiento de sus derechos de propiedad de la tierra.
8. Cf. Marx, «Excerpts from M. M. Kovalevsky», 383; «Exzerpte aus M. M. Kovalevskij», 76.
9. Ibid., 376; ibid., 69. Para leer un análisis de las posturas de Kovalevski y de ciertas diferencias con las de Marx, véase el capítulo «Kovalevsky on the Village Community and Land-ownership in the Orient», en Krader, The Asiatic Mode of Production, 190-213. Cf. Peter Hudis, «Accumulation, Imperialism, and Pre-capitalist Formations. Luxemburg and Marx on the Non-Western World», Socialist Studies VI, nro. 2 (2010): 84.
10. De acuerdo a Hans-Peter Harstick, «Einführung. Karl Marx und die zeitgenössische Verfassungsgeschichtsschreibung», en Marx, Über Formen vorkapitalistischer Produktion, Marx prefería «un análisis diferenciado de la historia europea y la asiática y dirigía su polémica (…) principalmente a aquellos que no hacían más que transponer conceptos socioestructurales del modelo de Europa occidental a las relaciones sociales de Asia o de la India» (ibid., XIII).
11. Marx, «Excerpts from M. M. Kovalevsky», 405; «Exzerpte aus M. M. Kovalevskij», 100. Las palabras que se indican entre corchetes son de Marx, mientras que las que figuran entre comillas pertenecen a los Annales de Assemblée Nationale, 1873, VIII, París, 1873, incluidos en el libro de Kovalevski.
12. Marx, «Excerpts from M. M. Kovalevsky», 405; «Exzerpte aus M. M. Kovalevskij», 100-1.
13. Ibid., 411; ibid., 107.
14. Ibid., 412; ibid., 109.
15. Ibid., 408 and 412; ibid., 103 and 108.
16. Ibid., 412; ibid., 109.
17. Según Krader en The Asiatic Mode of Production, las notas sobre Kovalevski contienen pasajes donde Marx refuta «la aplicación de la teoría de la sociedad feudal a la India y a Argelia» (ibid., 343).
18. James White, Marx and Russia: The Fate of a Doctrine (Londres: Bloomsbury, 2018), 37-40.
19. Karl Marx, Notes on Indian History (1664-1858) (Honolulú: University Press of the Pacific, 2001), 58.
20. Ibid., 165, 176, 180.
21. Ibid., 155-56, 163.
22. Ibid., 81.
23. Marx, Notes on Indian History (1664-1858), 163-4, 184.
24. Karl Marx a Nikolái Danielson, 19 de febrero de 1881, MECW, 46:63; MEW, 35:157.
25. Marx se refería a la segunda guerra de Afganistán y al sangriento conflicto en Sudáfrica conocido como la guerra anglo-zulú.
26. Ibid., 63-4; ibid.
27. Véase la información incluida en el volumen Die Bibliotheken von Karl Marx und Friedrich Engels, MEGA2, IV/32:184-7. Para leer una recreación del descubrimiento de la obra de Chernishevski por parte de Marx, véase «Entstehung und Überlieferung», en Karl Marx, Exzerpte und Notizen: Februar 1864 bis Oktober 1868, November 1869, März, April, Juni 1870, Dezember 1872, MEGA2, IV/18, 1142-4.
28. Sobre el sentido izquierdista y anticapitalista del concepto de populismo en la Rusia del siglo XIX, véase: Richard Pipes, «Narodnichestvo: A Semantic Inquiry», Slavic Review XXIII, nro. 3 (1964): 421-58. Andrzej Walicki, en Controversy Over Capitalism: Studies in the Social Philosophy of the Russian Populists (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1969), 27, ubica el nacimiento del populismo en 1869, cercano a la fecha de publicación de las Cartas históricas (1868-1870) de Pyotr Lavrov (1823-1900), ¿Qué es el progreso? (1869) de Nikolái Mijailovski (1842-1904) y La situación de la clase obrera en Rusia (1869) de Vasili Bervi Flerovski (1829-1918).
29. Karl Marx a Sigfrid Meyer, 21 de enero de 1871, MECW, 44:105; MEW, 33:173.
30. Karl Marx a Nikolái Danielson, 18 de enero de 1873, MECW, 44: 469; MEW, 33:599.
31. Karl Marx, «Afterword to the Second German Edition», en Marx, Capital, Volume One, MECW, 35:15; «Nachwort zur zweiten Auflage», Marx, Das Kapital, Erster Band, MEW, vol. 23:21.
32. Nikolái Chernishevski, «Kritika filosofskikh preubezhdenii protiv obshchinnogo vladeniya» [Crítica de los prejuicios filosóficos sobre la propiedad comunal de la tierra], en Chernishevski, Sobranie sochinenii, vol. 4, (Moscú: Ogonyok, 1974), 467.
33. Ibid., 470; Chernyshevskii, «A Critique of Philosophical Prejudices », 182.
34. Ibid.; ibid.
35. Marx ya había planteado una crítica similar de las tesis de Herzen en «Contribución a la crítica de la economía política», MECW, 29: 275; «Zur Kritik der Politischen Ökonomie», MEW, 13: 20. Como bien señala Franco Venturi en Roots of Revolution: A History of the Populist and Socialist Movements in Nineteenth Century Russia (Nueva York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1960), Chernishevski no consideraba la obshchina «una institución típicamente rusa, característica del espíritu eslavo (…) sino [un ejemplo de] la supervivencia en Rusia de formas de organización social que ya habían desaparecido en otros lugares» (ibid., 148).
36. Nikolái Chernishevski, «Kritika filosofskikh preubezhdenii», 371.
37. Para Venturi en Roots of Revolution, este punto constituyó el tema central del comentario de Chernishevski sobre la comuna campesina: «La obschina debe ser revivida y transformada por el socialismo occidental; no debe ser representada como el modelo y el símbolo de la misión rusa» (ibid., 160).
38. Walicki, en Controversy Over Capitalism, sostiene que para Chernishevski el capitalismo representaba «un gran avance respecto de las formas sociales precapitalistas»; su «enemigo número uno» no era «el capitalismo sino el atraso ruso» (ibid., 20).
39. Chernishevski, «Kritika filosofskikh preubezhdenii», 466.
40. Vera Zasulich, «A Letter to Marx», en Late Marx and the Russian Road, ed. Shanin (Londres: Routledge, 1984), 98-9.
41. Ibid.
42. Como bien observa Walicki en Controversy Over Capitalism, el estudio que hizo Marx de La sociedad antigua, de Morgan, «le permitió ver con nuevos ojos el populismo ruso, que por ese entonces representaba el intento más significativo de “encontrar lo más nuevo en lo más viejo”» (ibid. 192).
43. Karl Marx, Capital, Volumen I, MECW, 35:749; Das Kapital, Erster Band, MEW, 23:790-1.
44. Ibid., MECW, 35:750; ibid., MEW, 23:790.
45. Ibid., MECW, 35:504-5; ibid., MEW, 23:526.
46. Ibid., MECW, 35:506; ibid., MEW, 23:528.
47. Ibid., MECW, 35:90-91; ibid., MEW, 23:94.
48. Karl Marx, «Critique of the Gotha Programme», MECW, 24:83; “Kritik des Gothaer Programms”, MEW, 19:17.
49. Véase James H. Billington, Mikhailovsky and Russian Populism (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1958).
50. De acuerdo con Walicki en Controversy Over Capitalism, «Mijailovski no negaba que los gremios y los artels rusos contemporáneos habían limitado tanto la libertad individual como la posibilidad de desarrollo individual; no obstante, él creía que las consecuencias negativas de dichas limitaciones habían sido menos peligrosas que los resultados negativos del desarrollo capitalista. (…) Mijailovski concluyó que no se justificaba en absoluto afirmar que el capitalismo había “liberado al individuo”. (…) No es exagerado afirmar que entre los autores cuyos libros más contribuyeron a que Mijailovski aprobara dicha postura, Marx fue el más importante» (ibid., 59-60).
51. Nikolái Mijailovski, «Karl Marks pered sudom g. Yu. Zhukovskogo» (Karl Marx ante el tribunal del Sr. Yu. Zhukovsky), en Mijailovski, Sochinenija, vol. IV, San Petersburgo: B. M. Vol’f, 1897, 171, citado de la traducción presente en Walicki, Controversy Over Capitalism, 146. Este artículo se ocupa de las críticas a Marx que fueron publicadas en 1877 a nombre de Yuri Zhukovsky en el periódico El Mensajero Europeo [Vestnik Evropy] y la defensa de El capital efectuada por Nikolái Sieber en Otechestvennye Zapiski. Véase Cyril Smith, Marx at the Millennium (Londres: Pluto, 1996), 53-5. En 1894, en un artículo que escribió para Russkoe Bogatsvo [Riqueza Rusa], Mijailovski volvió a enunciar los argumentos de diecisiete años atrás.
52. Marx, «Letter to Otechestvennye Zapiski», MECW, 24:196; MEW,19:107.
53. Marx, «Letter to Otechestvennye Zapiski», MECW, 24:135; MEW, 19:108.
54. Marx, Capital, MECW, 35:704-761; MEW, 23:741-802.
55. Marx, «Letter to Otechestvennye Zapiski», MECW, 24:200; MEW,19:108. Véase también Karl Marx, Le capital, Paris 1872-1875, MEGA², II/7:634. Este agregado a la edición original de 1867, que Marx introdujo cuando revisó la traducción francesa de su libro, no fue incluida por Engels en la edición alemana de 1890, que más adelante se transformó en la versión estándar para las futuras traducciones de El capital. En una nota al pie en Karl Marx, Œuvres. Économie I (París: Gallimard, 1963), Maximilien Rubel, calificó a este pasaje como «uno de los agregados importantes» (ibid., 1701, n. 1) a la parte dedicada a «La acumulación “primitiva”». La edición publicada por Engels manifiesta que la historia de la acumulación primitiva «asume formas diferentes en cada país y atraviesa varias fases en distintos órdenes de sucesión y en distintas épocas históricas. Solo en Inglaterra, que hemos tomado de ejemplo, se observa su forma clásica». Marx, Capital, MECW, 35:707; MEW, 23:744.
56. Marx, «Letter to Otechestvennye Zapiski», MECW, 24:200; MEW,19:111.
57. Marx, «Letter to Otechestvennye Zapiski», MECW, 24:200; MEW,19:108, 111.
58. Ibid., 201; ibid., MEW, 19:111.
59. Ibid.; ibid.
60. Véase Pier Paolo Poggio, L’Obščina. Comune contadina e rivoluzione in Russia (Milán: Jaca Book, 1978), 148.
61. Muchos han intentado explicar por qué Marx no publicó su réplica a Mijailovski. En 1885, cuando Engels se la envió a los editores de Severnii Vestnik, declaró que «desconocía» los motivos por los cuales no había sido publicada, Friedrich Engels, «To the Editors of the Severny Vestnik», en MECW, 26: 311. No obstante, un año antes, en una carta a Vera Zasulich, había dicho: «Esta es la réplica que él escribió; lleva el sello de un artículo pensado para la publicación en Rusia, pero él nunca la mandó a Petersburgo por miedo a que la mera mención de su nombre pusiera en riesgo la existencia del periódico que publicara su réplica». Friedrich Engels a Vera Zasulich, 6 de marzo de 1884, MECW, 47: 112. Cabe señalar que no hay pruebas de que el periódico realmente hubiese estado en peligro si hubiese publicado un texto de Marx. Sin haber realizado las comprobaciones necesarias para fundamentar su tesis, Haruki Wada, «Marx and Revolutionary Russia», en Late Marx, ed. Shanin, afirmó que «el verdadero motivo (…) más bien tuvo que ver con que Marx, después de releer su carta, detectó defectos en su crítica de Mijailovski» (ibid., 60). White, en Marx and Russia, señaló que, en el número de Otechestvennye Zapiski inmediatamente posterior al artículo de Mijailovski, Sieber reafirmó que «el proceso formulado por Marx era universalmente obligatorio» (ibid., 33). La convicción de Sieber de que «el capitalismo era un fenómeno universal observado en todas las sociedades en determinada etapa de su desarrollo» (ibid., 45) es un ejemplo revelador de cómo se percibía a Marx en Rusia.
62. Karl Marx, «Drafts of the Letter to Vera Zasulich: First Draft», MECW, 24:349; «Brief von V. I. Sassulitsch: Erster Entwurf», MEW, 19:384-5.
63. Karl Marx, «Drafts of the Letter to Vera Zasulich: Third Draft», MECW, 24:365; «Brief von V. I. Sassulitsch: Dritter Entwurf», MEW, 19:402.
64. Marx, «Second Draft», MECW, 24:361; MEW, 19:397.
65. Véase también Teodor Shanin, «Late Marx: Gods and Craftsmen», en Late Marx, ed. Shanin, 16.
66. Marx, «Second Draft», MECW, 24:361; MEW, 19: 397.
67. Karl Marx, «The Future Results of British Rule in India», MECW, 12:217-18; «Die künftigen Ergebnisse der britischen Herrschaft in Indien», MEW, 9:221.
68. Ibid., MECW, 12:221; ibid., MEW, 9:224.
69. Ibid., MECW, 12:222; ibid., MEW, 9:226.
70. Véase, por ejemplo, Edward Said, Orientalism (Londres: Routledge, 1995), 153-6. Said (1935-2003) no solo afirmó que «los análisis económicos de Marx encajan perfectamente (…) con el proyecto orientalista estándar» sino que además insinuó que dependen de «la antigua distinción entre Oriente y Occidente», (ibid., 154). En rigor, la lectura de la obra de Marx realizada por Said es unilateral y superficial. El primero en subrayar los defectos de esta interpretación fue Sadiq Jalal al-Azm (1934-2016), que, en su artículo «Orientalismo y orientalismo a la inversa», Khamsin 8 (1980), escribió: «Esta descripción de las posturas y los análisis de Marx sobre procesos y situaciones históricos complejos es una farsa. (…) No hay ninguna referencia específica a Asia o al Oriente en el corpus de Marx» (ibid., 14-15). En cuanto a «las capacidades productivas, la organización social, la ascendencia histórica, el poderío militar y el desarrollo tecnológico, (…) Marx, como todos los demás, conocía la superioridad de la Europa moderna respecto de Oriente. Pero acusarlo (…) de transformar este hecho contingente en una realidad necesaria para todos los tiempos es, ni más ni menos, absurdo» (ibid., 15-16). En la misma línea, como bien demostró Aijaz Ahmad, en In Theory: Classes, Nations, Literatures (Londres: Verso, 1992), Said «descontextualizó citas» extraídas de la obra de Marx, con escasa conciencia de lo que representaba cada pasaje en cuestión, con el único objeto de insertarlas en su «archivo orientalista» (ibid., 231, 223). Otro texto que desmiente el supuesto eurocentrismo de Marx es el de Irfan Habib, «Marx’s Perception of India», en Karl Marx on India, ed. Iqbal Husain (Nueva Delhi: Tulika, 2006), XIX-LIV. Para conocer más sobre las limitaciones de los artículos periodísticos de Marx del año 1853, véase Kolja Lindner, «Marx’s Eurocentrism: Postcolonial Studies and Marx’s Scholarship», Radical Philosophy 161 (2010): 27-41.
71. Para Eric Hobsbawm, en la introducción a Pre-Capitalist Economic Formations de Karl Marx (Londres: Lawrence & Wishart 1964), «el interés cada vez mayor de Marx por el comunalismo primitivo: su odio y su desprecio, cada vez más pronunciado, por la sociedad capitalista. (…) Parece probable que Marx, que anteriormente había visto con buenos ojos el impacto del capitalismo occidental por considerarlo una fuerza inhumana pero históricamente progresiva para las economías precapitalistas estancadas, haya comenzado a sentir cada vez más consternación por su carácter inhumano» (ibid., 50).
72. Marx, «Third Draft», MECW, 24:365; MEW, 19:402.
73. Ibid., MECW, 24:368; ibid., MEW, 19:405.
74. Ibid., MECW, 24:367; ibid., MEW, 19:405.
75. Marx, «Third Draft», MECW, 24:368; MEW, 19:405.
76. Marx, «First Draft», MECW, 24:349; MEW, 19:385.
77. Marx, «First Draft», MECW, 24:353; MEW,19:389-90.
78. Véanse las interpretaciones de Wada, «Marx and Revolutionary Russia», en Late Marx, ed. Shanin, 60, donde se argumenta que los borradores evidencian un «cambio significativo» desde la publicación de El capital en 1867. Del mismo modo, Enrique Dussel, El último Marx (1863-1882) y la liberación latinoamericana (México, D. F.: Siglo XXI, 1990) habla de un «cambio de rumbo» (pp. 260, 268-9) y Tomonaga Tairako, «Marx on Capitalist Globalization», Hitotsubashi Journal of Social Studies 35 (2003) ha afirmado que Marx «cambió su perspectiva de la revolución global llevada a cabo por la clase trabajadora» (ibid., 12). Otros autores han sugerido una lectura «tercermundista» del Marx tardío, según la cual los sujetos revolucionarios ya no son los obreros fabriles sino las masas del campo y la periferia. Para encontrar reflexiones y diversas interpretaciones de estas cuestiones, véanse Umberto Melotti, Marx and the Third World (Londres: Palgrave 1977); Kenzo Mohri, «Marx and “Underdevelopment”», Monthly Review 30/11 (1979), 32-43; y Jean Tible, Marx Selvagem (San Pablo: Autonomia Literaria 2018).
79. Véase el excelente trabajo de Marian Sawer, Marxism and the Question of the Asiatic Mode of Production (La Haya: Martinus Nijhoff, 1977), 67: «Lo que ocurrió en la década de 1870 en particular no fue que Marx haya cambiado de parecer en cuanto al carácter de las comunidades de las aldeas, ni que haya decidido que podían constituir la base del socialismo tal como eran; más bien, comenzó a contemplar la posibilidad de que a dichas comunidades las revolucionara el socialismo y no el capitalismo. (…) Parece haber considerado seriamente la esperanza de que el sistema de aldeas se pudiera incorporar a una sociedad socialista mediante la intensificación de la comunicación social y la modernización de los métodos de producción. En 1882, a Marx todavía le parecía una alternativa genuina a la desintegración total de la obshchina por el impacto del capitalismo».
80. Cf. Venturi, «Introduzione», en Venturi, Il populismo russo. Herzen, Bakunin, Cernysevskij, vol. I (Turin: Einaudi, 1972): «En definitiva, Marx terminó aceptando las ideas de Chernishevski» (ibid., XLI). Esto se asemeja a la opinión de Walicki en Controversy Over Capitalism: «El razonamiento de Marx tiene mucho en común con la Crítica de los prejuicios filosóficos contra la propiedad comunal de la tierra de Chernishevski». Si los populistas hubieran podido leer los borradores preliminares de la carta a Zasulich, «sin duda hubieran encontrado en ellos una invaluable justificación de sus esperanzas por parte de una figura con autoridad» (ibid., 189).
81. Marx, «First Draft», MECW, 24: 358; MEW, 19:391.
82. Ibid., MECW, 24:356; ibid., MEW, 19:390-1.
83. Ibid.; ibid., MEW, 19:392.
84. El artel, una forma de asociación cooperativa de origen tártaro, se basaba en los vínculos de parentesco y se ocupaba de la responsabilidad colectiva de sus integrantes para con terceros y el Estado.
85. Marx, «First Draft», MECW, 24:356; MEW, 19:389.
86. Marx y Engels, «Preface to the Second Russian Edition», MECW, 24:426; MEW, 19:296.
87. Según Walicki, Controversy Over Capitalism, el texto breve de 1882 «reafirm[ó] la tesis de que el socialismo era más factible en los países altamente desarrollados, pero al mismo tiempo [dio] por sentado que el desarrollo económico de los países atrasados podía atravesar transformaciones fundamentales por la influencia de las condiciones internacionales» (ibid., 180).
88. Karl Marx, A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, MECW, 29:263; Zur Kritik der Politischen Ökonomie, MEW, 13:9.
89. Véase Michael Krätke, «Marx and World History», International Review of Social History 63, nro. 1 (2018), que en su reconstrucción de estos cuatro cuadernos afirmó que Marx compiló estas notas porque creyó, durante mucho tiempo, que estaba «otorgando al movimiento socialista una sólida base sociocientífica en lugar de una filosofía política» (ibid., 92).
90. En algunos casos, el contenido de sus cuadernos difiere levemente de las fechas indicadas por Engels. La única parte que fue publicada comprende aproximadamente un sexto del total de los cuadernos tercero y cuarto, y la mayoría de las páginas se tomaron de este último. Véase Karl Marx y Friedrich Engels, Über Deutschland und die deutsche Arbeiterbewegung. Las secciones extraídas de los Extractos cronológicos se incluyen en Band 1: Von der Frühzeit bis zum 18. Jahrhundert (Berlín: Dietz, 1973): 285-516.
91. Krätke, en «Marx and World History», afirma que «Marx no dio lugar al eurocentrismo; de ninguna manera consideraba que la historia mundial fuese análoga a la “historia europea”» (ibid., 104).
92. Krätke, ibid., postuló que la caída del Estado mongol «invit[ó] a Marx a reflexionar sobre los límites del poder político en territorios vastos» (ibid., 112).
93. Véase Karl Marx y Friedrich Engels, Über Deutschland und die deutsche Arbeiterbewegung (Berlín Dietz, 1978), 424-516.
94. En «Marx and World History», Krätke manifestó que en el cuarto cuaderno de los Extractos cronológicos se observa «la solidez de Marx como científico social bien informado en cuanto a la historia, que alterna con facilidad entre el desarrollo interno de países específicos y la gran política europea e internacional sin por ello perder de vista los fundamentos económicos del todo» (ibid., 6).
95. Cf. Friedrich Engels a Eduard Bernstein, 22-25 de febrero de 1882, MECW, 46:210-1; MEW, 35:285. Sin dudas, Lafargue exageraba cuando afirmó, más adelante, que «Marx ha vuelto con la cabeza llena de África y de los árabes; aprovechó su estadía en Argel para devorar su biblioteca, y me parece que ha leído una gran cantidad de libros sobre la condición de los árabes», Paul Lafargue a Friedrich Engels, 16 de junio de 1882, en Engels, Paul y Laura Lafargue, Correspondence, 83. Como señaló Badia, es mucho más probable que Marx no haya podido «aprender demasiado sobre la situación sociopolítica de la colonia francesa», si bien sus «cartas desde Argel dan fe de su curiosidad heterogénea», en Gilbert Badia, «Marx en Algérie», en Karl Marx, Lettres d’Alger, 13.
96. Ibid., MECW, 46:238; ibid., MEW, 35:305.
97. Karl Marx a Friedrich Engels, 8 de abril de 1882, MECW, 46:234; MEW, 35:54. Marx volvió a tocar el tema en otro contexto cuando le describió a Engels la brutalidad de las autoridades francesas respecto de un «árabe pobre, sicario de profesión y culpable de robo y múltiples homicidios». A poco de ser ejecutado, el hombre se enteró de que «¡no iban a ejecutarlo con armas de fuego, sino que lo iban a guillotinar! ¡En contravención de lo pactado anteriormente!» Y eso no era todo: «Sus parientes supusieron que les devolverían el cuerpo y la cabeza para que ellos pudieran coserlos y luego enterrar el cuerpo “entero”. ¡Pero no fue así! Aullidos, palabrotas y rechinar de dientes; ¡por primera vez, las autoridades francesas se emperraron en esto! Ahora, cuando el cuerpo llegue al paraíso, Mohammed preguntará: “¿Dónde se dejó la cabeza? ¿O cómo es que la cabeza se le separó del cuerpo? No es apto para entrar al paraíso. ¡Váyase y júntese con esos perros cristianos en el infierno!” Y es por eso que sus parientes estaban tan contrariados», Karl Marx a Friedrich Engels, 18 de abril de 1882, MECW, 46:246-7; MEW, 35:57-8.
98. La guerra de 1882 concluyó con la batalla de Tel el-Kebir (13 de septiembre de 1882), que terminó con la denominada «revuelta Urabi», que había comenzado en 1879 y había permitido a los británicos establecer un protectorado en Egipto.
99. Karl Marx a Eleanor Marx, 9 de enero de 1883, MECW, 46:422-3; MEW, 35:422.
100. Karl Marx, IISH Ámsterdam, Marx-Engels Papers, B 168, 11-18. Véase David Smith, «Accumulation by Forced Migration», cuyos comentarios sobre estas notas resaltan su relevancia actual: «El único aspecto de estos acontecimientos que resulta sorprendente hoy en día es que hayan ocurrido en el siglo XIX. Lo que Marx observó e informó en el caso egipcio fue un modelo temprano de la era de la globalización actual» (ibid., próxima edición).

Categories
Book chapter

Revisitando la concepción de la alienación en Marx

I. Introducción
La alienación puede situarse entre las teorías más relevantes y discutidas del siglo XX, y la concepción de la misma elaborada por Marx asume un rol determinante en el ámbito de las discusiones desarrolladas sobre el tema.
Sin embargo, a diferencia de lo que se podría imaginar, el curso de su afirmación no fue en absoluto lineal, y la publicación de algunos textos inéditos de Marx conteniendo reflexiones sobre la alienación, han representado hitos significativos en la transformación y propagación de esta teoría.
A lo largo de los siglos, el término alienación fue utilizado muchas veces y con diferentes significados. En el discurso teológico, designaba la distancia entre el hombre y Dios; en las teorías del contrato social, servía para indicar la pérdida de la libertad originaria del individuo; mientras que en la economía política inglesa, fue utilizado para describir a la cesión de la propiedad privada de la tierra o de la mercancía. Sin embargo, la primera exposición filosófica sistemática de la alienación sólo apareció a comienzos del siglo XIX y fue obra de G. W. F. Hegel. En La fenomenología del espíritu (1807), Hegel hizo de la misma la categoría central del mundo moderno y adoptó los términos Entäusserung (literalmente, auto-exteriorización o renunciamiento) y Entfremdung (extrañamiento, escisión) para representar el fenómeno por el cual el espíritu deviene el otro de sí mismo en la objetividad. Esta problemática fue muy importante también para los autores de la izquierda hegeliana, y para la concepción de la alienación religiosa expuesta por Feuerbach en La esencia del cristianismo (1841) – o sea, la crítica del proceso por el cual el ser humano se convence de la existencia de una divinidad imaginaria y se somete a ella – contribuyendo en forma significativa al desarrollo del concepto. Posteriormente la alienación desapareció de la reflexión filosófica, y ninguno de los principales pensadores de la segunda mitad del siglo XIX le prestó una particular atención. Hasta el mismo Marx usó raramente el término en las obras publicadas durante su vida, y el término también estuvo totalmente ausente en el marxismo de la Segunda Internacional (1889-1914).
Sin embargo, durante este período, varios autores desarrollaron conceptos que luego serían asociados con la alienación. Émile Durkheim, por ejemplo, en sus obras La división del trabajo (1893) y El suicidio (1897), utilizó el término “anomia” para indicar un conjunto de fenómenos que se manifestaban en la sociedad, en los que las normas que garantizaban la cohesión social entraban en crisis a raíz del alto desarrollo de la división del trabajo. Las tendencias sociales que han tenido lugar luego de los inmensos cambios en el proceso productivo también constituyeron el fundamento de las reflexiones de sociólogos alemanes. George Simmel, en La filosofía del dinero (1900), dedicó mucha atención al predominio de las instituciones sociales sobre los individuos y la creciente despersonalización de las relaciones humanas, mientras Max Weber, en su Economía y sociedad (1922), explicó largamente los conceptos de la “burocratización” y el “cálculo racional” en las relaciones humanas, considerándolos como la esencia del capitalismo. Pero estos autores consideraban a estos fenómenos como hechos inevitables, y sus reflexiones reflejaban el deseo de mejorar el orden social y político existente, y por cierto, no el de reemplazarlo por otro diferente.

II. El redescubrimiento de la alienación
Fue gracias a György Lukács que se redescubrió la teoría de la alienación, cuando en Historia y conciencia de clase (1923) se refirió a ciertos pasajes de El capital de Marx (1867), en particular en el párrafo dedicado al “fetichismo de la mercancía” (Der Fetsichcharakter der Ware ) e elaboró el concepto de reificación (Verdinglichung, Versachlichung) para describir el fenómeno por el que la actividad laboral se contrapone al hombre como algo objetivo e independiente, y lo domina mediante leyes autónomas y ajenas a él. Pero en los tramos fundamentales, la teoría de Lukács era todavía similar a la hegeliana, pues concebía la reificación como “un hecho estructural fundamental”. Posteriormente, luego de que la aparición de una traducción francesa [1] le diera a esta obra una gran influencia entre los estudiosos y los militantes de izquierda, Lukács decidió republicar su texto en una nueva edición con un largo prólogo autocrítico (1967), en el cual, para aclarar su posición, afirmó que “Historia y conciencia de clase sigue a Hegel en la medida que, también en este libro, identifica a la extrañación con la objetificación”. [2]
Otro autor que en la década de 1920 prestó gran atención a esta temática fue Isaak Rubin, en cuyo libro Ensayos sobre la teoría marxista del valor (1928) afirmaba que la teoría del fetichismo de la mercancía constituía “la base de todo el sistema económico de Marx, y en particular de su teoría del valor”. [3] Para este autor ruso, la reificación de las relaciones sociales de producción representaba “un fenómeno real de la economía mercantil-capitalista”, [4] y consistía en la “materialización” de las relaciones de producción, y no una simple “mistificación” o ilusión ideológica:
Esa es una de las características de la estructura económica de la sociedad contemporánea (…) El fetichismo no sólo es un fenómeno de la conciencia social, sino del ser social.” [5]
A pesar de estas lúcidas ideas, proféticas sin consideramos la época en que fueron escritas, la obra de Rubin no logró contribuir a estimular el conocimiento de la teoría de la alienación, dado que sólo fue conocida en Occidente cuando se la tradujo al inglés en 1972 (y del inglés a otros idiomas). El hecho decisivo que revolucionó finalmente la difusión del concepto de alienación fue la aparición en 1932 de los Escritos económico-filosóficos de 1844, un texto inédito, perteneciente a la producción juvenil de Marx. De este texto emerge el rol principal o de primer plano que había conferido Marx a la teoría de la alienación durante una importante fase de la formación de su concepción: la del descubrimiento de la economía política. [6] En efecto, Marx, mediante la categoría del trabajo alienado (entfremdete Arbeit), [7] no sólo desplazó la problemática de la alienación desde la esfera filosófica, religiosa y política a la económica de la producción material; sino también hizo de esta última la premisa para poder comprender y superar las primeras. En los Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844, se describe a la alienación como el fenómeno mediante el cual el producto del trabajador surge frente a este último “como un ser ajeno, como una fuerza independiente del productor”. Para Marx:
… la enajenación [Entäusserung] del trabajador en su producto significa no solo que el trabajo de aquel se convierte en un objeto, en una existencia externa, sino que también el trabajo existe fuera de él, como algo independiente, ajeno a él; se convierte en una fuerza autónoma de él: significa que aquella vida que el trabajador ha concedido al objeto se le enfrenta como algo hostil y ajeno. [8]
Junto a esta definición general, Marx enumeró cuatro diferentes tipos de alienaciones que indicaban como era alienado el trabajador en la sociedad burguesa: a) del producto de su trabajo, que deviene “un objeto ajeno que tiene poder sobre él”; b) en su actividad laboral, que él percibe como “dirigida contra sí mismo”, como si “no le perteneciera a él” [9] ; c) del “ser genérico del hombre”, que se transforma en “un ser ajeno a él”; y d) de otros seres humanos , y en relación con su trabajo y el objeto de su trabajo. [10]
Para Marx, a diferencia de Hegel, la alienación no coincidía con la objetivación como tal, sino con una precisa realidad económica y con un fenómeno específico: el trabajo asalariado y la transformación de los productos del trabajo en objetos que se contraponen a sus productores. La diferencia política entre estas dos posiciones es enorme. Contrariamente a Hegel, que había representado la alienación como una manifestación ontológica del trabajo, Marx concebía este fenómeno como la característica de una determinada época de la producción, la capitalista, considerando que era posible superarla, mediante “la emancipación de la sociedad respecto de la propiedad privada”. [11] Consideraciones análogas fueron desarrolladas en los cuadernos que contenían extractos de Elementos de economía política, de de James Mill:
El trabajo sería la manifestación libre de la vida y por consiguiente, el disfrute de la vida. Pero en el marco de la propiedad privada, eso es la alienación de la vida, pues trabajo para vivir, para procurarme los medios de vida. Mi trabajo no es vida. Más aún, en mi trabajo se afirmaría el carácter específico de mi individualidad porque sería mi vida individual. El trabajo sería pues mi auténtica y activa propiedad. Pero en las condiciones de la propiedad privada mi individualidad es alienada hasta el punto en que esta actividad me es odiosa, para mí es una tortura y sólo la apariencia de una actividad y por lo tanto solo es una actividad forzada que se me impone, no por una necesidad interna, sino por una necesidad exterior arbitraria. [12]
De este modo, aún en estos fragmentarios y a veces vacilantes textos juveniles, Marx trató a la alienación siempre desde un punto de vista histórico, nunca desde un punto de vista natural.

III. Las concepciones no marxistas de la alienación
Sin embargo, pasaría mucho tiempo antes de que se pudiera afirmar una concepción histórica, no ontológica, de la alienación. En efecto, la mayor parte de los autores que, en las primeras décadas del siglo XX, se ocupó de esta problemática, lo hacía siempre considerándola un aspecto universal de la existencia humana. Por ejemplo, en Ser y Tiempo, Martín Heidegger (1927), abordó el problema de la alienación desde un punto de vista meramente filosófico y consideró a esta realidad como una dimensión fundamental de la historia. La categoría que usó para describir la fenomenología de la alienación fue la de la “caída” (Verfallen): es decir, la tendencia a estar-ahí (Dasein), – que en la filosofía heideggeriana indica la constitución ontológica de la vida humana – a perderse en la inautenticidad y el conformismo hacia el mundo que lo circunda. Para él, “el estado de caída en el ‘mundo’ designa el absorberse en la convivencia regida por la habladuría, la curiosidad y la ambigüedad”; un territorio, por consiguiente, completamente diferente de la fábrica y de la condición obrera fabril, que se hallaba en el centro de las preocupaciones y de las elaboraciones teóricas de Marx. Además, esta condición de la “caída” no era considerada por Heidegger como una condición “mala y deplorable que, en una etapa más desarrollada de la cultura humana, pudiera quizás ser eliminada”, sino más bien como una característica ontológico-existencial, “un modo existencial de estar-en-el-mundo.” [13]
También Herbert Marcuse, que a diferencia de Heidegger conocía bien la obra de Marx, identificó la alienación con la objetivación en general, no con su manifestación en las relaciones capitalistas de producción. En un ensayo publicado en 1933, sostiene que “el carácter de ‘carga’ del trabajo” [14] no podía ser atribuido simplemente a “ciertas condiciones en la ejecución del trabajo, o sobre su condicionamiento técnico-social” [15] , sino que se debía considerar como uno de sus rasgos fundamentales:
Al trabajar, el trabajador está “en la cosa” tanto si está frente a una máquina, como desarrollando un plan técnico, tomando medidas de organización, investigando problemas científicos, o impartiendo enseñanzas, etc. En su hacer, él se deja guiar por la cosa, subordinándose y atándose a su normatividad, incluso cuando domina su objeto (…) En todo caso, el trabajador no está “consigo mismo”, (…) más bien se pone a disposición de lo-otro-que-él, está en ello, en eso-otro; incluso cuando ese hacer llena su propia vida, libremente aceptada. Esta enajenación y alienación de la existencia, (…) es por principio imposible de suprimir. [16]
Para Marcuse, por consiguiente, había una “negatividad esencial del trabajo” que él consideraba que pertenecía a “la negatividad enraizada en la entidad de la existencia humana misma.” [17] La crítica de la alienación deviene, así, una crítica de la tecnología y el trabajo en general. La superación de la alienación sólo se la consideraba posible en el momento del juego, momento en el cual el hombre podía alcanzar la libertad que se le negaba en la actividad productiva: “En un solo lanzamiento de una pelota del jugador, reside un triunfo infinitamente mayor de la libertad del ser humano sobre la objetividad que en la más grande realización de un trabajo técnico.” [18]
En Eros y civilización (1955), Marcuse tomó distancia de la concepción marxiana, de manera similar. Allí afirmó que la emancipación humana sólo podría realizarse mediante la liberación del trabajo y a través de la afirmación de la libido y el juego de las relaciones sociales. Descartaba definitivamente la posibilidad de superar la explotación mediante el nacimiento de una sociedad basada en la propiedad común de los medios de producción, puesto que el trabajo en general, no sólo el trabajo asalariado, era considerado como:
… trabajo que está al servicio de un aparato que ellos [la vasta mayoría de la población] no controlan, que opera como un poder independiente al que los individuos deben someterse si quieren vivir. Y este poder se hace más ajeno conforme la división del trabajo llega a ser más especializada. (…) Trabajan (…) enajenados (…). Porque el trabajo enajenado es la ausencia de gratificación, la negación del principio del placer.” [19]
La norma cardinal contra la que los seres humanos deberían rebelarse sería el “principio de actuación” impuesto por la sociedad. Pues, para Marcuse,
el conflicto entre la sexualidad y la civilización se despliega con este desarrollo de la dominación. Bajo el dominio del principio de actuación, el cuerpo y la mente son convertidos en instrumentos del trabajo enajenado; sólo pueden funcionar como tales instrumentos si renuncian a la libertad del sujeto-objeto libidinal que el organismo humano es y desea ser (…) El hombre existe (…) como un instrumento de la actuación enajenada. [20]
Por consiguiente, él sostiene que la producción material, aunque fuera organizada en forma justa y racional, “nunca podrá ser el campo de la libertad y la gratificación. (…) La esfera ajena al trabajo es la que define la libertad y su realización.” [21] La alternativa propuesta por Marcuse era abandonar el mito prometeico tan caro a Marx para llegar a un horizonte dionisíaco: la “liberación de Eros”. [22] A diferencia de Freud, quien había sostenido en La civilización y sus descontentos (1929) que una organización no represiva de la sociedad implicaría una regresión peligrosa del nivel de civilización alcanzado en las relaciones humanas, Marcuse estaba convencido de que, si la liberación de los instintos tuviera lugar en una “sociedad libre” tecnológicamente avanzada [23] al servicio del hombre, no sólo habría favorecido “un desarrollo del progreso” sino también creado “nuevas y durables relaciones de trabajo.” [24]
Pero sus indicaciones sobre cómo debería tomar cuerpo esta nueva sociedad fueron más bien vagas y utópicas. Marcuse terminó promoviendo la oposición al dominio tecnológico en general, por lo cual su crítica de la alienación ya no era más utilizada contra las relaciones capitalistas de producción, y comenzó a desarrollar reflexiones sobre el cambio social tan pesimistas como la de incluir a la clase obrera entre los sujetos que operaban en defensa del sistema.
La descripción de una alienación generalizada, producto de un control social invasivo y de la manipulación de las necesidades, creada por la capacidad de influencia de los medios de comunicación de masas, fue teorizada también por otros dos principales exponentes de la Escuela de Frankfurt, Max Horkheimer y Theodor Adorno. En Dialéctica del iluminismo (1944) afirmaron que “la racionalidad técnica es hoy la racionalidad del dominio. Y el carácter forzado (…) de la sociedad alienada de sí misma.” [25] De este modo, habían puesto en evidencia que, en el capitalismo contemporáneo, incluso la esfera del tiempo del ocio, libre y alternativa al trabajo, había sido absorbida en los engranajes de la reproducción del consenso.
Después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, el concepto de la alienación también llegó al psicoanálisis. Quienes se ocuparon partieron de la teoría de Freud, por la cual, en la sociedad burguesa, el hombre está puesto ante la necesidad de elegir entre la naturaleza y la cultura, y para poder disfrutar la seguridad garantizada por la civilización debe necesariamente renunciar a sus propias pulsiones. [26] Algunos psicólogos relacionaron a la alienación con las psicosis que se manifestaban, en algunos individuos como resultado de esta conflictiva elección. Por consiguiente, toda la vasta problemática de la alienación quedaba reducida a un mero fenómeno subjetivo. El autor que más se ocupó de la alienación desde el psicoanálisis fue Erich Fromm. A diferencia de la mayoría de sus colegas, jamás separó sus manifestaciones del contexto histórico capitalista; en verdad, con sus libros La sociedad sana (1955) y El concepto del hombre en Marx (1961) se sirvió de este concepto para tratar de construir un puente entre el psicoanálisis y el marxismo. Pero asimismo, Fromm afrontó esta problemática privilegiando siempre el análisis subjetivo, y su concepción de la alienación, a la que resumió como “un modo de experiencia en el que el individuo se percibe a sí mismo como un extraño” [27] , siguió estando muy circunscripta al individuo. Además, su interpretación del concepto en Marx sólo se basó en los Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844 y se caracterizó por una profunda incomprensión de la especificidad y la centralidad del concepto del trabajo alienado en el pensamiento de Marx. Esta laguna le impidió dar la debida importancia a la alienación objetiva (la del trabajador en el proceso laboral y respecto al producto de su trabajo) y lo llevó a sostener, precisamente por haber pasado por alto la importancia de las relaciones productivas, posiciones que parecen hasta ingenuas:
Marx creía que la clase trabajadora era la clase más enajenada (…) No previó la medida en la que la enajenación había de convertirse en la suerte de la gran mayoría de la gente (…) El empleado, el vendedor, el ejecutivo, están actualmente todavía más enajenados que el trabajador manual calificado. El funcionamiento de este último todavía depende de la expresión de ciertas cualidades personales, como la destreza, el desempeño de un trabajo digno de confianza, etc., y no se ve obligado a vender en el contrato su “personalidad”, su sonrisa, sus opiniones. [28]
Entre las principales teorías no marxistas de la alienación hay que mencionar, por último, la asociada con Jean-Paul Sartre y los existencialistas franceses. En la década de 1940, en un período caracterizado por los horrores de la guerra, de la consiguiente crisis de la conciencia y, en el panorama francés, del neohegelianismo de Alexandre Kojève [29] , el fenómeno de la alienación fue considerado como una referencia frecuente, tanto en la filosofía como en la literatura narrativa [30] . Sin embargo, también en estas circunstancias, la concepción de la alienación asume un perfil mucho más genérico que el que expuso Marx. Esa concepción se identificaba con un descontento confuso del hombre en la sociedad, con una separación entre la personalidad humana y el mundo de la experiencia, y, significativamente, como una condition humaine no eliminable. Los filósofos existencialistas no proporcionaban un origen social específico para la alienación, sino que la asimilaban con toda “facticidad” (sin duda, el fracaso de la experiencia soviética favoreció la afirmación de esta posición), concebían la alienación como un sentido genérico de la alteridad humana. En 1955, Jean Hippolyte expuso esta posición en una de las obras más significativas de esta tendencia filosófica: Ensayos sobre Marx y Hegel, del siguiente modo:
[la alienación] no parece ser reducible solamente al concepto de la alienación del hombre bajo el capitalismo, tal como la comprende Marx. Esta última sólo es un caso particular de un problema más universal de la autoconciencia humana que, no pudiendo autoconcebirse como un cogito aislado, sólo puede auto-reconocerse en un mundo que construye, en los otros yoes que reconoce y por quienes es ocasionalmente enajenado. Pero esta forma de autodescubrimiento a través del Otro, esta objetivación, siempre es más o menos una alienación, una pérdida del yo y simultáneamente un autodescubrimiento. De esta manera la objetivación y la alienación son inseparables, y su unión es simplemente la expresión de una tensión dialéctica observada en el mismo movimiento de la historia. [31]
Marx había contribuido a desarrollar una crítica del sometimiento humano, basada en el antagonismo con las relaciones capitalistas de producción. Los existencialistas, en cambio, siguieron una trayectoria opuesta, tratando de reabsorber el pensamiento de Marx, a través de aquellas partes de su obra juvenil que podían resultar más útiles para sus propias tesis, en una discusión sin una crítica histórica específica [32] y a veces meramente filosófica.

IV. El debate sobre el concepto de alienación en los escritos juveniles de Marx
En la discusión sobre la alienación que se desarrolló en Francia, se recurrió frecuentemente a la teoría de Marx. Sin embargo, en este debate, a menudo sólo se examinaban a los Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844. Ni siquiera se ponían en consideración los fragmentos de El capital sobre los que Lukács había construido su teoría de la reificación en los años veinte. Más aún, a algunas frases de los Manuscritos de 1844 se las separaba completamente de su contexto y eran transformadas en citas sensacionalistas que supuestamente se destinaban a demostrar la existencia de un “nuevo Marx” radicalmente diferente de lo que hasta entonces se conocía, saturado de filosofía y exento del determinismo económico que atribuían algunos críticos a El capital (a menudo, sin haberlo leído). Aunque también respetaban al manuscrito de 1844, los existencialistas franceses privilegiaron exageradamente al concepto de la autoalienación (Selbstentfremdung), o sea el fenómeno de la alienación del trabajador respecto del género humano y de otros como él – un fenómeno que Marx había tratado en sus escritos juveniles, pero siempre en relación con la alienación objetiva.
El mismo error, pero más flagrante, lo cometió una exponente del primer plano del pensamiento filosófico-político de posguerra, Hannah Arendt. En La condición humana (1958), construyó su interpretación del concepto de la alienación en Marx sólo en base a los Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844, y además, privilegiando, entre las tantas tipologías de la alienación que indicaba Marx, exclusivamente la subjetiva. Esto le permitía afirmar:
(…) la expropiación y la alienación del mundo coinciden, y la época moderna, en contra de las intenciones de los personajes de la obra, comenzó a alienar del mundo a ciertos estratos de la población. (…) La alienación del mundo, y no la propia alienación, como creía Marx, ha sido la marca de contraste de la edad moderna. [33]
Una demostración de su escasa familiaridad con las obras de la madurez de Marx es el hecho de que al señalar que Marx “no desconocía por completo las implicancias de la alienación del mundo en la economía capitalista”, se refería sólo a unas pocas líneas en su muy temprano artículo, “Los debates sobre la Ley acerca del robo de leña” (1842), y no a las decenas de páginas, mucho más importantes, contenidas en El capital y en los manuscritos preparatorios que precedieron a este libro. Y su sorprendente conclusión fue que “esas ocasionales consideraciones desempeñan un papel menor en su obra, que permaneció firmemente enraizada en el extremo subjetivismo de la época moderna” [34] ¿Dónde y de qué modo Marx había privilegiado la “autoalienación” en sus análisis de la sociedad capitalista? Esta cuestión sigue siendo un misterio que Arendt jamás dilucidó en sus textos.
En la década de 1960, la exégesis de la teoría de la alienación en los Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844 se convirtió en una de las principales manzanas de la discordia en la interpretación general de la obra de Marx. Es en este período que se concibe la distinción entre dos presuntos Marx: el “joven Marx” y el “Marx maduro”. Esta oposición arbitraria y artificial era alentada por quienes preferían al Marx de las primeras obras filosóficas y por quienes opinaban que el único Marx verdadero era el Marx de El capital (entre ellos Louis Althusser y los académicos rusos). Mientras que los primeros consideraban a la teoría de la alienación en los Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844 como la parte más importante de la crítica social de Marx, los últimos exhibían una verdadera “fobia a la alienación” y al principio trataron de minimizar su relevancia; [35] o, cuando esta estrategia no fue más posible, descartaron todo el tema de la alienación como “un pecado de juventud, un residuo de hegelianismo” [36] posteriormente abandonado por Marx. Los primeros omitieron el hecho de que la concepción de la alienación contenida en los Manuscritos de 1844 había sido escrita por un autor de 26 años, que recién emprendía sus estudios principales; los segundos en cambio se negaron a reconocer la importancia de la teoría de la alienación en Marx, aún cuando la publicación de nuevos textos inéditos evidenció que él jamás había dejado de ocuparse de ella en el curso de su vida y que esta teoría, aun con modificaciones, había conservado un lugar relevante en las principales etapas de la elaboración de su pensamiento.
Sostener, como decían muchos, que la teoría de la alienación contenida en los Manuscritos de 1844 fuese el tema central del pensamiento de Marx es una falsedad que indica solamente la escasa familiaridad con su obra por parte de los que defienden esta tesis. [37] Por el otro lado, cuando Marx volvió a ser el autor más discutido y citado en la literatura filosófica mundial, precisamente por sus páginas inéditas relativas a la alienación, el silencio de la Unión Soviética sobre esta temática, y sobre las controversias asociadas con él, ofrece un ejemplo de la utilización instrumental que se hizo de sus escritos en ese país. Pues la existencia de la alienación en la Unión Soviética y sus satélites fue simplemente negada, y a todos los textos que trataban esta problemática se los consideraba sospechosos. Según Henri Lefebvre, “en la sociedad soviética, ya no debía, ya no podía haber una cuestión de alienación. El concepto debía desaparecer, por orden superior, por razones de estado”. [38] En consecuencia, hasta los años setenta, fueron muy pocos los autores que, en el llamado “campo socialista” escribieron sobre las obras en cuestión. En fin, también algunos escritores occidentales consagrados subestimaron la complejidad del fenómeno. Es el caso de Lucien Goldmann, que se ilusiona sobre la posible superación de la alienación en las condiciones económico-sociales de la época, y en sus Recherches dialectiques (1959) sostuvo que podría desaparecer, o revertirse, gracias al mero efecto de la planificación. “La reificación es en realidad un fenómeno estrechamente ligado a la ausencia de planificación y con la producción para el mercado”; el socialismo soviético en el Este y las políticas keynesianas en Occidente traerían “el resultado de una supresión de la reificación en el primer caso, y un debilitamiento progresivo en el segundo.” [39] La historia ha mostrado la falacia de sus pronósticos.

V. El irresistible encanto de la teoría de la alienación
A partir de los años sesenta estalló una verdadera moda relativa a la teoría de la alienación y, en todo el mundo aparecieron cientos de libros y artículos sobre el tema. Fue la época de la alienación tout court. Autores diversos entre sí por su formación política y competencia disciplinaria atribuyeron la causa de este fenómeno a la mercantilización, a la excesiva especialización del trabajo, a la anomia, a la burocratización, al conformismo, al consumismo, a la pérdida de un sentido del yo, que se manifiestan en la relación con las nuevas tecnologías, e incluso al aislamiento del individuo, a la apatía, la marginalización social o étnica, y a la contaminación ambiental.
El concepto de la alienación parecía reflejar a la perfección el espíritu de la época, y constituir también el terreno del encuentro, en la elaboración de la crítica a la sociedad capitalista, entre el marxismo filosófico y antisoviético y el catolicismo más democrático y progresista. Sin embargo, la popularidad del concepto, y su aplicación indiscriminada, crearon una profunda ambigüedad terminológica. [40] De este modo, en el curso de pocos años, la alienación se convirtió en una fórmula vacía que englobaba todas las manifestaciones de la infelicidad humana, y la enorme ampliación de sus nociones generó la convicción de la existencia de un fenómeno tan extendido que parecería ser inmodificable. [41] Con el libro de Guy Debord, La sociedad del espectáculo, que luego de su aparición en 1967, pronto se convirtió en un verdadero manifiesto de crítica social para la generación de estudiantes que se rebelaban contra el sistema, la teoría de la alienación se enlazó con la crítica a la producción inmaterial. Recuperando las tesis de Horkheimer y Adorno, según las cuales en la sociedad contemporánea hasta el entretenimiento estaba siendo subsumido en la esfera de la producción del consenso con el orden social existente. Debord afirmó que en las presentes circunstancias el no-trabajo ya no podía ser considerado como una esfera diferente de la actividad productiva:
Mientras que en la fase primitiva de la acumulación capitalista “la economía política no ve en el proletariado sino al obrero” que debe recibir el mínimo indispensable para la conservación de su fuerza de trabajo, sin considerarlo jamás “en su ocio, en su humanidad”, esta posición de las ideas de la clase dominante se invierte tan pronto como el grado de abundancia alcanzado en la producción de mercancías exige una colaboración adicional del obrero. Este obrero redimido de repente del total desprecio que le notifican claramente todas las modalidades de organización y vigilancia de la producción, fuera de ésta se encuentra cada día tratado aparentemente como una persona importante, con solícita cortesía, bajo el disfraz de consumidor. Entonces el humanismo de la mercancía tiene en cuenta “el ocio y la humanidad” del trabajador, simplemente porque ahora la economía política ahora puede y debe dominar esas esferas. [42]
Para Debord, si el dominio de la economía sobre la vida social inicialmente se había manifestado mediante una “degradación del ser en el tener”, en la “fase presente” se verificaba un “deslizamiento generalizado del tener hacia el parecer.” [43] Tales reflexiones lo impulsaron a cuestionar en el centro de su análisis al mundo del espectáculo: “En la sociedad el espectáculo corresponde a una fabricación concreta de la alienación,” [44] el fenómeno mediante el cual “el principio del fetichismo de la mercancía (…) se cumple de un modo absoluto.” [45] En estas circunstancias, la alienación se afirmaba a tal punto de convertirse incluso en una experiencia entusiasmante para los individuos, los cuales, dispuestos por este nuevo opio del pueblo al consumo y a “reconocerse en las imágenes dominantes,” [46] se alejaban siempre más, al mismo tiempo, de sus propios deseos y existencia real:
El espectáculo señala el momento en que la mercancía ha alcanzado la ocupación total de la vida social (…) la producción económica moderna extiende su dictadura extensiva e intensamente (…) En este punto de la “segunda revolución industrial”, el consumo alienado se convierte para las masas, en un deber añadido a la producción alienada. [47]
Siguiendo a Debord, Jean Baudrillard también utilizó el concepto de alienación para interpretar críticamente las mutaciones sociales que intervinieron con el capitalismo maduro. En La sociedad de consumo (1970), identificó en el consumo al factor primario de la sociedad moderna, tomando así distancia de la concepción marxiana, anclada en la centralidad de la producción. Según Baudrillard, la “era del consumo”, en la que la publicidad y las encuestas de opinión creaban necesidades ficticias y consensos masivos, se convertía también en “la era de la alienación radical”.
La lógica de la mercancía se ha generalizado y hoy gobierna, no sólo al proceso del trabajo y los productos materiales, sino también la cultura en su conjunto, la sexualidad, las relaciones humanas, hasta las fantasías y las pulsiones individuales (…) Todo se vuelve espectáculo, es decir, todo se presenta, se evoca, se orquesta en imágenes, en signos, en modelos consumibles. [48]
Sin embargo, sus conclusiones políticas eran más bien confusas y pesimistas. Frente a una gran etapa de fermento social, él acusó a “los contestatarios del mayo francés” de haber caído en la trampa de “súper-reificar los objetos y el consumo dándoles un valor diabólico”; y criticó a “todos los discursos sobre la ‘alienación’, todo el escarnio del pop y el anti-arte”, por haber creado una “acusación que es parte del mito, de un mito que completan entonando el contracanto en la liturgia formal del Objeto.” [49] Así pues, alejado del marxismo, que veía en la clase obrera el sujeto social de referencia para cambiar el mundo, finalizó su libro con una apelación mesiánica, tan genérica cuanto efímera: “Habrá que esperar las irrupciones brutales y las disgregaciones súbitas que, de manera tan imprevisible pero segura, como las de mayo de 1968, terminen por desbaratar esta misa blanca.” [50]

VI. La teoría de la alienación en la sociología norteamericana
En la década de 1950, el concepto de la alienación también ingresó en el vocabulario de la sociología norteamericana. Pero el enfoque sobre el tema fue completamente diferente respecto al prevaleciente en Europa. De hecho, en la sociología convencional se volvió a tratar la alienación como una problemática inherente al ser humano individual, no a las relaciones sociales, [51] y se dirigió la búsqueda de soluciones para su superación hacia la capacidad de adaptación de los individuos al orden existente, y no hacia las prácticas colectivas para cambiar la sociedad. [52]
También en esta disciplina reinó por largo tiempo una profunda incertidumbre acerca de una definición clara y compartida. Algunos autores evaluaron este fenómeno como un proceso positivo, porque era un medio de expresión de la creatividad del hombre e inherente a la condición humana en general. [53] Otra característica difundida entre los sociólogos estadounidenses fue la de considerar a la alienación como algo que surgía de la escisión entre el individuo y la sociedad. [54] Por ejemplo, Seymour Melman identificó la alienación en la separación entre la formulación y la ejecución de las decisiones, y la consideró como un fenómeno que afectaba tanto a los obreros como a los gerentes. [55] En el artículo “Una medida de la alienación” (1957), que inauguró un debate sobre el concepto en la American Sociological Review, Gwynn Nettler empleó el instrumento de la encuesta en el intento de establecer una definición. Pero en una forma muy distante de la tradición de la rigurosa investigación sobre las condiciones laborales realizadas en el movimiento obrero, su formulación del cuestionario pareció inspirarse más en los cánones macartistas de esa época que en los cánones de la investigación científica. [56]
Nettler, de hecho, representando a las personas alienadas como sujetos guiados por “un coherente mantenimiento de una actitud hostil e impopular contra la familia, los medios de comunicación de masas, los gustos masivos, la actualidad, la educación popular, la religión tradicional y la visión teleológica de la vida, el nacionalismo y el sistema electoral” [57] , identificó la alienación con el rechazo de los principios conservadores de la sociedad estadounidense.
La pobreza conceptual presente en el panorama sociológico norteamericano cambió luego de la publicación del ensayo de Melvin Seeman “Sobre el significado de la alienación” (1959). En este breve artículo, que pronto se convirtió en una referencia obligada para todos los estudiosos de la alienación, catalogó aquellos que él consideraba que eran sus cinco formas principales: la falta de poder, la falta de significado (o sea, la dificultad del individuo para comprender los acontecimientos en los que está insertado), la carencia de normas, el aislamiento y el extrañamiento de sí mismo [58] . Este listado muestra cómo también Seeman consideraba la alienación bajo un perfil principalmente subjetivo.
Robert Blauner, en su libro Alienation and Freedom (1964), expuso el mismo punto de vista. El autor definió la alienación como “una cualidad de la experiencia personal que resulta de tipos específicos de configuraciones sociales”, [59] y también hizo pródigos esfuerzos en su investigación, que lo condujo a rastrear las causas en “el proceso del trabajo en las organizaciones gigantescas y burocracias impersonales que saturan a todas las sociedades industriales.” [60]
En el ámbito de la sociología norteamericana, por consiguiente, la alienación fue concebida como una manifestación relativa al sistema de producción industrial, prescindiendo de si éste era capitalista o socialista, y como una problemática inherente sobre todo a la conciencia humana. [61] Este enfoque finalizó colocando en los márgenes, o incluso excluyendo, al análisis de los factores histórico-sociales que determinan la alienación, produciendo una especie de hiper-psicologización del análisis de este concepto, que fue asumida también en esta disciplina, además de en la psicología. Es decir, ya no consideraba más que la alienación era una cuestión social, sino que era una patología individual cuya solución sólo incumbía a cada individuo. [62] Mientras que en la tradición marxista el concepto de la alienación representaba uno de los conceptos más incisivos del modo capitalista de producción, en la sociología sufrió un proceso de institucionalización y terminó siendo considerado como un fenómeno relativo a la falta de adaptación de los individuos a las normas sociales. De igual modo, el concepto de alienación perdió el carácter normativo que había tenido en la filosofía (aún para autores que pensaban a la alienación como un horizonte insuperable) y se transformó en un concepto no evaluativo, al cual se le había despojado el contenido crítico originario. [63]
Otro efecto de esta metamorfosis de la alienación fue su empobrecimiento teórico. De un fenómeno global, relativo a la condición laboral, social e intelectual del hombre, fue reducido a una categoría limitada, parcializada en función de las investigaciones académicas. [64] Los sociólogos estadounidenses afirmaron que esta elección metodológica permitiría liberar la investigación de la alienación de sus connotaciones políticas y conferirle una objetividad científica. En realidad, este presunto giro apolítico tenía fuertes y evidentes implicancias ideológicas, pues tras la bandera de la des-ideologización y la presunta neutralidad de los valores se ocultaba el apoyo a los valores y al orden social dominante.
La diferencia entre la concepción marxista de la alienación y la de los sociólogos estadounidenses no consistía, por consiguiente, en el hecho de que la primera era política y la segunda era científica, sino al contrario, que los teóricos marxistas sostenían valores completamente diferentes a los valores hegemónicos, mientras que los sociólogos estadounidenses sostenían los valores del orden social existente, hábilmente disfrazados como valores eternos del género humano. [65] En la sociología, por lo tanto, el concepto de alienación sufrió una verdadera distorsión y ha llegado a ser utilizado por los defensores de aquellas mismas clases sociales contra las que dicho concepto había sido dirigido durante tanto tiempo. [66]

VII. La alienación en El capital y en sus manuscritos preparatorios
Los escritos de Marx tuvieron, obviamente, un rol fundamental para quienes intentaban oponerse a la tendencia, manifestada en el ámbito de las ciencias sociales, de cambiar el sentido del concepto de la alienación. La atención puesta en la teoría de la alienación en Marx, inicialmente centrada en sus Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844, se desplazó, luego de la publicación de inéditos ulteriores, sobre los nuevos textos y con eso fue posible reconstruir desarrollo de sus elaboraciones, de los escritos juveniles a El capital.
En la segunda mitad de la década de 1840, Marx no utilizó tan frecuentemente la palabra “alienación”. Con excepción de La sagrada familia (1845), escrito con la colaboración de Engels, donde el término fue utilizado en algunos pasajes polémicos sobre algunos exponentes de la izquierda hegeliana, referencias a este concepto se encuentran solamente en un largo fragmento de La ideología alemana (1845-6), también escrito en conjunto con Engels:
La división del trabajo nos brinda ya el primer ejemplo de cómo (…) los actos propios del hombre se erigen ante él en un poder ajeno y hostil, que lo sojuzga, en vez de ser él quien los domine. (…) Esta plasmación de las actividades sociales, esta consolidación de nuestros propios productos en un poder material erigido sobre nosotros, sustraído a nuestro control, que levanta una barrera ante nuestra expectativa y destruye nuestros cálculos, es uno de los momentos fundamentales que se destacan en todo el desarrollo histórico anterior. (…) El poder social, es decir, la fuerza de producción multiplicada, que nace por obra de la cooperación de los diferentes individuos bajo la acción de la división del trabajo, se les aparece a estos individuos, por no tratarse de una cooperación voluntaria, sino natural, no como un poder propio, asociado, sino como un poder ajeno, situado al margen de ellos, que no saben de dónde procede ni a dónde se dirige y que, por tanto, no pueden ya dominar, sino que recorre, por el contrario, una serie de fases y etapas de desarrollo peculiar e independiente de la voluntad y los actos de los hombres y que incluso dirige esta voluntad y estos actos. Con esta “enajenación”, para expresarnos en términos comprensibles para los filósofos, sólo puede acabarse partiendo de dos premisas prácticas. Para que se convierta en un poder “insoportable”, es decir en un poder contra el que hay que sublevarse, es necesario que engendre a una masa de la humanidad como absolutamente “desposeída” y, a la par con ello, en contradicción con un mundo existente de riquezas y de cultura, lo que presupone, en ambos casos, un incremento de la fuerza productiva, un alto grado de su desarrollo [67].
Abandonado por sus autores el proyecto de publicar este último libro, posteriormente, en Trabajo asalariado y capital, que era una colección de artículos redactados en base a los apuntes utilizados para una serie de conferencias que dio a la Liga de Trabajadores Alemanes en Bruselas en 1847, y fue enviado a la imprenta en 1849, Marx vuelve a exponer la teoría de la alienación, pero al no poder dirigirse al movimiento obrero con un concepto que habría parecido demasiado abstracto, decidió no utilizar esta palabra. Escribió que el trabajo asalariado no entraba en la “actividad vital” del obrero, sino que representaba, más bien, un momento de “sacrificio de su vida”. La fuerza de trabajo es una mercancía que el obrero está forzado a vender “para poder vivir”, y “el producto de su actividad no [era] el propósito de su actividad”: [68]
… para el obrero que teje, hila, taladra, tornea, construye, cava, machaca piedras, carga, etc., por espacio de doce horas al día, ¿son estas doce horas de tejer, hilar, taladrar, tornear, construir, cavar y machacar piedras la manifestación de su vida, su vida misma? Al contrario, para él la vida comienza allí donde terminan estas actividades, en la mesa de su casa, en el banco de la taberna, en la cama. Las doce horas de trabajo no tienen para él sentido alguno en cuanto a tejer, hilar, taladrar, etc., sino solamente como medio para ganar el dinero que le permite sentarse a la mesa o en el banco de la taberna y meterse en la cama. Si el gusano de seda hilase para ganarse el sustento como oruga, sería el auténtico obrero asalariado. [69]
En la obra de Marx no hubo más referencias a la teoría de la alienación hasta fines de la década de 1850. Luego de la derrota de las revoluciones de 1848, fue forzado a exiliarse en Londres y durante este período, para concentrar todas sus energías en el estudio de la economía política, con la excepción de algunos trabajos breves de carácter histórico, [70] no publicó ningún libro. Cuando comenzó a escribir nuevamente sobre economía, sin embargo, en los Elementos fundamentales para la crítica de la economía política (mejor conocidos como los Grundrisse), Marx volvió a utilizar repetidamente el concepto de alienación. Este texto recordaba, de muchas maneras, lo que se había expuesto en los Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844, aunque, gracias a los estudios realizados mientras tanto, su análisis resultó ser mucho más profundo:
El carácter social de la actividad, así como la forma social del producto y la participación del individuo en la producción, se presentan aquí como algo ajeno y con carácter de cosa frente a los individuos; no como su estar recíprocamente relacionados, sino como su estar subordinados a relaciones que subsisten independientemente de ellos y nacen del choque de los individuos recíprocamente indiferentes. El intercambio general de las actividades y de los productos, que se ha convertido en condición de vida para cada individuo particular y es su conexión recíproca [con los otros], se presenta ante ellos mismos como algo ajeno, independiente, como una cosa. En el valor de cambio el vínculo social entre las personas se transforma en relación social entre cosas; la capacidad personal, en una capacidad de las cosas. [71]
En los Grundrisse, por consiguiente, la descripción de la alienación, adquiere un mayor espesor respecto de la realizada en los escritos juveniles, porque se enriquece con la comprensión de importantes categorías económicas y por un análisis social más riguroso. Junto al vínculo entre la alienación y el valor de cambio, entre los pasajes más brillantes que delinearon la característica de este fenómeno de la sociedad moderna figuran aquellos en los que la alienación fue puesta en relación con la contraposición entre el capital y la “fuerza viva del trabajo”:
Las condiciones objetivas del trabajo vivo se presentan como valores disociados, autónomos, frente a la capacidad viva de trabajo como existencia subjetiva; (…) las condiciones objetivas de la capacidad viva de trabajo están presupuestas como existencia autónoma frente a ella, como la objetividad de un sujeto diferenciado de la capacidad viva de trabajo y contrapuesto autónomamente a ella; la reproducción y valorización, esto es, la ampliación de estas condiciones objetivas, es al mismo tiempo, pues, la reproducción y producción nueva de esas condiciones como sujeto de la riqueza, extraño, indiferente, ante la capacidad de trabajo y contrapuesto a ella de manera autónoma. Lo que se reproduce y se produce de manera nueva no es sólo la existencia de estas condiciones objetivas del trabajo vivo, sino su existencia como valores autónomos, esto es, pertenecientes a un sujeto extraño, contrapuestos a esa capacidad viva de trabajo. Las condiciones objetivas del trabajo adquieren una existencia subjetiva frente a la capacidad viva de trabajo: del capital nace el capitalista. [72]
Los Grundrisse no fueron el único texto de la madurez de Marx en el cual la descripción de la problemática de la alienación se repite con frecuencia. Cinco años después de su redacción, de hecho, ella retornó en El capital, Libro 1, Capítulo VI, inédito (1863-4) (también conocido como los “Resultados del proceso inmediato de producción”), manuscrito en el cual el análisis económico y el análisis político de la alienación fueron puestos en una mayor relación entre ellos: “La dominación del capitalista sobre el obrero es por consiguiente la de la cosa sobre el hombre, la del trabajo muerto sobre el trabajo vivo, la del producto sobre el productor”. [73] En estos proyectos preparatorios de El capital, Marx pone en evidencia que en la sociedad capitalista, mediante “la trasposición de las fuerzas productivas sociales del trabajo en las propiedades objetivas del capital,” [74] se realiza una auténtica “personificación de las cosas y reificación de las personas,” o se crea la apariencia vigente de que “los medios de producción, las condiciones objetivas de trabajo, no aparecen subsumidos en el obrero, sino éste en ellas.” [75] En realidad, en su opinión:
El capital no es una cosa, al igual que el dinero no lo es. En el capital, como en el dinero, determinadas relaciones de producción entre personas se presentan como relaciones entre cosas y personas o determinadas relaciones sociales aparecen como cualidades sociales que ciertas cosas tienen por naturaleza. Sin trabajo asalariado, ninguna producción de plusvalía, ya que los individuos se enfrentan como personas libres; sin producción de plusvalía, ninguna producción capitalista, ¡y por ende ningún capital y ningún capitalista! Capital y trabajo asalariado (así denominamos el trabajo del obrero que vende su propia capacidad laboral) no expresan otra cosa que dos factores de la misma relación. El dinero no puede transmutarse en capital si no se intercambia por capacidad de trabajo, en cuanto mercancía vendida por el propio obrero. Por lo demás, el trabajo sólo puede aparecer como trabajo asalariado cuando sus propias condiciones objetivas se le enfrentan como poderes egoístas, propiedad ajena, valor que es para sí y aferrado a sí mismo, en suma: como capital. Por lo tanto, si el capital, conforme a su aspecto material, o al valor de uso en el que existe, sólo puede consistir en las condiciones objetivas del trabajo mismo, con arreglo a su aspecto formal estas condiciones objetivas deben contraponerse como poderes ajenos, autónomos, al trabajo, esto es, deben contraponérsele como valor –trabajo objetivado – que se vincula con el trabajo vivo en cuanto simple medio de su propia conservación y acrecimiento. [76]
En el modo capitalista de producción, el trabajo humano se convierte en un instrumento del proceso de valorización del capital, el que, al “incorporarse la capacidad viva de trabajo a los componentes objetivos del capital, éste se transforma en un monstruo animado y se pone en acción ‘cual si tuviera dentro del cuerpo el amor’.” [77] Este mecanismo se expande en una escala siempre mayor, hasta que la cooperación en el proceso de producción, los descubrimientos científicos y el empleo de maquinaria – o sea los progresos sociales generales de la colectividad – se convierten en fuerzas del capital que aparecen como propiedades de eso poseído por naturaleza y se yerguen extraños frente a los trabajadores como ordenamiento capitalista:
Las fuerzas productivas del trabajo social, así desarrolladas, [aparecen] como fuerzas productivas del capital. (…) La unidad colectiva en la cooperación, la combinación en la división del trabajo, el uso de las fuerzas de la naturaleza y las ciencias, de los productos del trabajo, como la maquinaria; todos estos confrontan a los trabajadores individuales autónomamente, como un ente ajeno, objetivo, preexistente a ellos, sin y a menudo contra su concurso, como meras formas de existencia de los medios de trabajo que los dominan a ellos y de ellos son independientes, en la medida en que esas formas [son] objetivas. Y la inteligencia y voluntad del taller colectivo encarnadas en el capitalista o sus representantes (understrappers), en la medida en que ese taller colectivo está formado por la propia combinación de aquellos, [se les contraponen] como funciones del capital que vive en el capitalista. [78]
Es mediante este proceso, por consiguiente, que, según Marx, el capital se convierte en un ser “extremadamente misterioso”. Y sucede, de este modo, que “las condiciones de trabajo se acumulan ante el obrero como poderes sociales, y de esta suerte están capitalizadas.” [79] La difusión, a comienzos de la década de 1960, de El capital, Libro 1, Capítulo VI, inédito y sobre todo, de los Grundrisse [80] abrió el camino para una nueva concepción de la alienación, diferente respecto a la que hasta entonces había sido hegemónica en la sociología y la psicología, cuya comprensión se dirigía a su superación práctica, o sea a la acción política de los movimientos sociales, partidos y sindicatos para cambiar las condiciones de trabajo y de vida de la clase obrera. La publicación de lo que (luego de la aparición en la década de 1930 de los Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844) podría ser considerada como la “segunda generación” de los escritos de Marx sobre la alienación, proporcionaba no sólo una base teórica coherente para una nueva época de estudios sobre la alienación, sino sobre todo una plataforma ideológica anticapitalista para el extraordinario movimiento político y social que comenzaba a estallar en el mundo en ese período. Con la difusión de El capital y de sus manuscritos preparatorios, la teoría de la alienación salió de los papeles de los filósofos y las aulas universitarias, para irrumpir, a través de las luchas obreras, en las plazas y convertirse en una crítica social.

VIII. El fetichismo de la mercancía y la desalienación
Una de las mejores descripciones de la alienación realizada por Marx es la que se encuentra contenida en la célebre sección de El capital titulada “el carácter fetichista de la mercancía y su secreto”. En su interior pone en evidencia que, en la sociedad capitalista, los seres humanos son dominados por los productos que han creado y viven en un mundo en el cual las relaciones recíprocas aparecen, “no como relaciones directamente sociales entre las personas mismas, (…) sino por el contrario como relaciones propias de cosas y relaciones sociales entre las cosas”: [81]
Lo misterioso de la forma mercantil consiste (…) en que la misma refleja ante los hombres el carácter social de su propio trabajo como caracteres objetivos inherentes a los productos del trabajo, como propiedades sociales naturales de dichas cosas, y, por ende, en que también refleja la relación social que media entre los productores y el trabajo global, como una relación social entre los objetos, existente al margen de los productores. Es por medio de este quid pro quo como los productos del trabajo se convierten en mercancías, en cosas sensorialmente suprasensibles o sociales. (…) Lo que aquí adopta, para los hombres, la forma fantasmagórica de una relación entre cosas, es sólo la relación social determinada existente entre aquellos. De ahí que para hallar una analogía pertinente debamos buscar amparo en las neblinosas comarcas del mundo religioso. En éste los productos de la mente humana parecen figuras autónomas, dotadas de vida propia, en relación unas con otras y con los hombres. Otro tanto ocurre en el mundo de las mercancías con los productos de la mano humana. A esto llamo el fetichismo que se adhiere a los productos de trabajo no bien se los produce como mercancías, y que es inseparable de la producción mercantil. [82]
De esta definición emergen las características particulares que trazan una clara línea divisoria entre la concepción de la alienación en Marx y la de la mayoría de los autores que hemos estado examinando en este ensayo. El fetichismo, en realidad, no fue concebido por Marx como una problemática individual; siempre fue considerado un fenómeno social. No como una manifestación del alma, sino como un poder real, una dominación concreta, que se realiza en la economía de mercado, a continuación de la transformación del objeto en sujeto. Por este motivo, Marx no limitó el análisis de la alienación al malestar de los seres humanos individuales, sino que analizó los procesos sociales que estaban en su base, y en primer lugar, la actividad productiva. Además, el fetichismo en Marx se manifiesta en una realidad histórica específica de la producción, la del trabajo asalariado; no está ligado a la relación entre la cosa en general y el ser humano, sino a la relación entre éste y un tipo determinado de objetividad: la mercancía.
En la sociedad burguesa, la propiedad y las relaciones humanas se transforman en propiedad y relaciones entre las cosas. Esta teoría de lo que, después de la formulación de Lukács se lo designó como reificación, ilustraba este fenómeno desde el punto de vista de las relaciones humanas, mientras que el concepto de fetichismo lo trataba en relación a las mercancías. A diferencia de los reclamos de quienes han negado la presencia de reflexiones sobre la alienación en la obra madura de Marx, la misma no fue sustituida por el fetichismo de la mercancía, porque éste representa sólo un aspecto particular de ella. [83]
El progreso teórico que realizó Marx respecto a la concepción de la alienación desde los Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844 hasta El capital no consiste, sin embargo, solamente en su descripción más precisa, sino también en una diferente y más acabada elaboración de las medidas consideradas necesarias para su superación. Si en 1844 había considerado que los seres humanos eliminarían la alienación mediante la abolición de la producción privada y la división del trabajo, en El capital y en sus manuscritos preparatorios, el camino indicado para construir una sociedad libre de la alienación se convirtió en algo mucho más complicado. Marx consideraba que el capitalismo era un sistema en el que los trabajadores estaban subyugados por el capital y sus condiciones, pero también estaba convencido del hecho que eso había creado las bases para una sociedad más avanzada, y que la humanidad podría proseguir el camino del desarrollo social generalizando los beneficios producidos por este nuevo modo de producción. Según Marx, un sistema que producía una enorme acumulación de riqueza para pocos y expoliaciones y explotación para la masa general de los trabajadores debía ser reemplazado por “una asociación de hombres libres, que trabajen con medios de producción colectivos y empleen, conscientemente, sus muchas fuerzas de trabajo individuales como una fuerza de trabajo social.” [84] Este distinto tipo de producción se diferenciaría del que está basado en el trabajo asalariado porque pondría sus factores determinantes bajo el dominio colectivo, asumiendo un carácter inmediatamente general y transformando el trabajo en una verdadera actividad social. Es una concepción de la sociedad en las antípodas de la bellum omnium contra omnes de Thomas Hobbes. Y su creación no es un proceso meramente político, sino que implicaría necesariamente la transformación radical de la esfera de la producción. Como Marx escribió en los manuscritos que luego se convertirían en El capital. Crítica de la economía política. Tomo III:
La libertad, en este terreno, sólo puede consistir en que el hombre socializado, los productores asociados, regulen racionalmente ese metabolismo suyo con la naturaleza poniéndolo bajo su control colectivo, en vez de ser dominados por él como por un poder ciego; que lo lleven a cabo con el mínimo empleo de fuerzas y bajo las condiciones más dignas y adecuadas a su naturaleza humana. [85]
Esta producción de carácter social, junto con los progresos científico tecnológicos y científicos y la consiguiente reducción de la jornada laboral, crea la posibilidad para el nacimiento de una nueva formación social, en la que el trabajo coercitivo y alienado, impuesto por el capital y sometido a sus leyes es progresivamente reemplazado por una actividad consciente y creativa no impuesta por la necesidad, y en la que las relaciones sociales plenas toman el lugar del intercambio indiferente y accidental en función de la mercancía y el dinero. [86] Ya no será más el reino de la libertad para el capital, sino el reino de la auténtica libertad humana.

 

Traducción: Francisco T. Sobrino

 

Referencias
[1] Histoire et conscience de clase, trad. Kostas Axelos y Jacqueline Bois, Paris: Minuit, 1960.
[2] Georg Lukács, Historia y conciencia de clase, México: Grijalbo, 1969, xxv.
[3] Isaak Illich Rubin, Ensayos sobre la teoría del valor de Marx, Buenos Aires: Pasado y Presente, 1974, 53.
[4] Ibíd., 76.
[5] Ibíd., 108.
[6] En realidad, Marx ya había usado el concepto de alienación antes de haber escrito dichos Manuscritos. En un texto publicado en el Deutsch-Französische Jahrbücher (febrero de 1844) escribió: “Una vez desenmascarada la forma sagrada que representaba la autoalienación del hombre, la primera tarea de la filosofía que se ponga al servicio de la historia, es desenmascarar esa autoalienación bajo sus formas profanas. La crítica del cielo se transforma así en crítica de la tierra, la crítica de la religión en crítica del derecho, la crítica de la teología en crítica de la política.” Karl Marx, “Contribución a la crítica de la filosofía del derecho de Hegel. Introducción”, en Karl Marx, Crítica de la filosofía del derecho de Hegel, Buenos Aires: Ediciones Nuevas, 1965, 11.
[7] En los escritos de Marx se halla el término Entfremdung tanto como Entäusserung. En Hegel estos términos tenían diferentes significados, pero Marx los utiliza como si fueran sinónimos. Ver Marcella D’Abbiero, Alienazione in Hegel. Usi e significati de Entäusserung, Entfremdung, Verüsserung, Roma: Edizioni Dell’Ateneo, 1970, 25-7.
[8] Karl Marx, Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844, 106-7.
[9] Ibíd., 110.
[10] Ibíd., 114. Para una explicación de la cuádruple tipología de la alienación en Marx, ver Bertell Ollman, Alienation, Nueva York: Cambridge University Press, 1971, 136-52.
[11] Karl Marx, ibíd., 118-9.
[12] Karl Marx, “Excerpts From James Mill’s Elements of Political Economy, en Early Writings, 278.
[13] Martín Heidegger, Ser y tiempo, www.philosophia.cl/ Escuela de Filosofía Universidad ARCIS. En el prólogo de 1967 a su reeditado libro Historia y conciencia de clase, Lukács observó que en Heidegger la alienación se convertía en un concepto políticamente inocuo, que “sublimaba una crítica de la sociedad en un problema puramente filosófico” (Lukács, xxiv). Heidegger también trató de distorsionar el significado del concepto de la alienación de Marx. En su Carta sobre el humanismo (1946), elogió a Marx porque en él la “alienación alcanza una dimensión esencial de la historia” (Martín Heidegger, “Letter on Humanism”, en Basic Writings, Londres: Routledge, 1993, 243), lo cual es una afirmación falsa porque no está presente en ninguno de los escritos de Marx.
[14] Herbert Marcuse, “Acerca de los fundamentos filosóficos del concepto científico-económico del trabajo”, en Ética de la revolución, Madrid: Taurus, 1970, 35.
[15] Ibíd., 22.
[16] Ibíd., 35.
[17] Ibíd.
[18] Ibíd., 18-19.
[19] Herbert Marcuse, Eros y civilización, Buenos Aires: Ariel, 1985, 54.
[20] Ibíd., 55. Georges Friedmann opinaba igual, y sostenía en The Anatomy of Work (New York: Glencoe Press, 1964) que la superación de la alienación sólo era posible luego de la liberación del trabajo.
[21] Marcuse, Eros y civilización, 151.
[22] Ibíd., 149.
[23] Ibíd., 190.
[24] Ibíd., 149. Cf. la evocación de “una ‘razón libidinal’ que no sólo sea compatible sino que inclusive promueva el progreso hacia formas más altas de libertad civilizada” (186). Sobre este tema cfr. El magistral libro de Harry Braverman, Lavoro e capitale monopolístico, Einaudi, Torino 1978, en el cual el autor sigue los principios de “la visión marxista que no combate a la ciencia y la tecnología en cuanto tales, sino solo al modo en el cual son reducidas a instrumentos de dominio, con la creación, el mantenimiento y la profundización de un abismo entre las clases sociales” (ivi, pág. 6).
[25] Max Horkheimer, Theodor W. Adorno, Dialéctica del iluminismo, Buenos Aires: Sudamericana, 1944, 147.
[26] Ver Sigmund Freud, Civilisation and its Discontents, Nueva York: Norton, 1962, 62 (La civilización y sus descontentos).
[27] Erich Fromm, The Sane Society, Nueva York: Fawcett, 1965, 111.
[28] Erich Fromm, El concepto del hombre en Marx, México DF: F.C.E., 1978, 67. Esta incomprensión del carácter específico del trabajo alienado aparece en sus textos sobre la alienación en la década de 1960. En un ensayo publicado en 1965 dijo: “Para entender plenamente el fenómeno de la alienación (…) hay que examinar su relación con el narcisismo, la depresión, el fanatismo y la idolatría.” “La aplicación del psicoanálisis humanista a la teoría de Marx”, en Erich Fromm, ed., Humanismo socialista, Buenos Aires: Paidós, 1966, 266.
[29] Ver Alexandre Kojève, Lectures on the Phenomenology of Spirit, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1980.
[30] Cfr. Jean-Paul Sartre, La náusea, México DF: Ed.Época, s/f; y Albert Camus, El extranjero, http://www.ciudadseva.com/textos/novela/fra/camus/el_extranjero.htm .
[31] Jean Hyppolite, Studies on Marx and Hegel, Nueva York/Londres: Basic Books, 1969, 88.
[32] Cf. István Mészáros, Marx’s Theory of Alienation, Londres: Merlin Press, 1970, 241 ff.
[33] Hannah Arendt, La condición humana, Buenos Aires: Paidós, 2009, 282-3.
[34] Ibíd., 350.
[35] Los directores del Instituto de Marxismo-Leninismo en Berlín hasta se las ingeniaron para excluir a los Manuscritos de 1844 de los tomos numerados de los canónicos Marx-Engels Werke, relegándolos a un tomo complementario con un tiraje más pequeño.
[36] Adam Schaff, Alienation as a Social Phenomenon, Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1980, 21.
[37] Cf. Daniel Bell, “The Rediscovery of Alienation: Some notes along the quest for the historical Marx”, Journal of Philosophy, vol. LVI, 24 (noviembre 1959), 933-52, que concluye: “leer este concepto como el tema central de Marx sólo es aumentar más el mito.” (935).
[38] Henri Lefebvre, Obras, T. I. Crítica de la vida cotidiana, Buenos Aires: Peña Lillo, 1967, 236
[39] Lucien Goldmann, Recherches dialectiques, Paris: Gallimard, 1959, 101.
[40] De este modo, Richard Schacht (Alienation, Garden City: Doubleday, 1970) señaló que “casi no hay ni un aspecto de la vida contemporánea que no haya sido discutido en relación con la ‘alienación’ (lix), mientras Peter C. Ludz (“Alienation as a Concept in the Social Sciences”, reimpreso en Félix Geyer y David Schweitzer, eds., Theories of Alienation, Leiden: Martinus Nijhoff, 1976), comentaban que la “popularidad del concepto sirve para incrementar la ambigüedad terminológica existente.”(3).
[41] Cf. David Schweitzer, “Alienation, De-alienation, and Change: A critical overview of current perspectives in Philosophy and the social sciences”, en Giora Shoham, ed., Alienation and Anomie Revisited, Tel Aviv: Ramot, 1982, para quien “el significado mismo de alienación frecuentemente está diluido hasta el punto de una virtual falta de sentido.” (57).
[42] Guy Debord, La sociedad del espectáculo, Rosario: Kolectivo Editorial “Último Recurso”, 2007, 43.
[43] Ibíd., 28.
[44] Ibíd., 34.
[45] Ibíd., 37.
[46] Ibíd., 33.
[47] Ibíd., 39.
[48] Jean Baudrillard, La sociedad de consumo, Madrid: Siglo XXI, 2009, 244-5.
[49] Ibíd., 250-1.
[50] Ibíd., 251.
[51] Ver por ejemplo John Clark, “Measuring alienation within a social system”, American Sociological Review, vol. 24, N° 6 (diciembre 1959), 849-52.
[52] Ver Schweitzer, “Alienation, De-alientation, and Change” (nota 40), 36-7.
[53] Un buen ejemplo de esta posición es “The Inevitability of Alienation”, de Walter Kaufman, que era su introducción al libro citado previamente, Alienation de Schacht. Para Kaufman, “la vida sin alienación casi no merece ser vivida; lo que importa es incrementar la capacidad de los hombres para hacer frente a la alienación (lvi).
[54] Schacht, Alienation, 155.
[55] Seymour Melman, Decision-making and Productivity, Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1958, 18, 165-6.
[56] Entre las preguntas formuladas por el autor a una muestra de sujetos considerados como inclinados a la “orientación alienada”, aparecían las siguientes preguntas: “¿le gusta ver la televisión? ¿Qué piensa del nuevo modelo de los automóviles americanos? ¿Lee Reader’s Digest? (…) ¿Participa de buen grado en actividades religiosas? ¿Le interesan los deportes nacionales (fútbol, béisbol)? (“A Measure of Alienación”, American Sociological Review, vol. 22, N° 6 (diciembre 1957), (675). Nettler está convencido de que una respuesta negativa a tales preguntas constituye una prueba de alienación; y en otra parte agregaba: “que debe haber pocas dudas sobre el hecho de que esta encuesta [y sus preguntas] mide una dimensión de la alienación de nuestra sociedad.”
[57] Ibíd., 674. Para demostrar su opinión, Nettler señaló que “a la pregunta, ‘¿le gustaría vivir bajo una forma de gobierno diferente a la actual?’, todos han respondido en una forma posibilista y ninguno con rechazo abierto” (674). También llegó a afirmar en la conclusión de su ensayo “que la alienación [era] correlativa con la creatividad. Se formula como hipótesis que los científicos y los artistas (…) son individuos alienados (…) que la alienación está relacionada con el altruismo [y] que su enajenación conduce al comportamiento criminal” (676-7).
[58] Melvin Seeman, “On the Meaning of Alienation”, American Sociological Review, vol. 24 N° 6 (diciembre 1959), 783-91. En 1972 agregó a la lista un sexto tipo: “la alienación cultural”. (Ver Melvin Seeman, “Alienation and Engagement” en Angus Campbell y Philip E. Converse, eds., The Human Meaning of Social Change, Nueva York: Russell Sage, 1972, 467-527).
[59] Robert Blauner, Alienation and Freedom, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1964, 15.
[60] Ibíd., 3.
[61] Cf. Walter R. Heinz, eds., “Changes in the Methodology of Alienation Research”, en Felix Geyer y Walter R. Heinz, eds., Alienation, Society and the Individual, New Brunswick/Londres: Transaction, 1992, 217.
[62] Ver Felix Geyer y David Schweitzer, “Introduction”, en idem, eds., Theories of Alienation (nota 39), xxi-xxii, y Felix Geyer, “A General Systems Approach to Psychiatric and Sociological De-alienation”, en Giora Shoham, ed. (nota 40), 141.
[63] Ver Geyer y Schweitzer, “Introduction”, xx-xxi.
[64] David Schweitzer, “Fetishization of Alienation: Unpacking a Problem of Science, Knowledge, and Reified Practices in the Workplace”, in Felix Geyer, ed., Alienation, Ethnicity, and Postmodernism, Westport/Londres: Greenwood Press, 1996,23.
[65] Cf. John Horton, “The Dehumanization of Anomie and Alienation: a problem in the ideology of sociology”, The British Journal of Sociology, vol. XV, N° 4 (1964), 283-300, y David Schweitzer, “Fetishization of Alienation”, 23.
[66] Ver Horton, “Dehumanization”. Esta tesis la defiende orgullosamente Irving Louis Horowitz en “The Strange Career of Alienation: how a concept is transformed without permission of its founders”, en Felix Geyer, ed. (note 63), 17-19. Según Horowitz, “la alienación ahora es parte de la tradición en las ciencias sociales, en vez de una protesta social. Este cambio surgió cuando tuvimos una mayor comprensión de que los términos como estar alienado están tan cargados de valor como estar integrado. El concepto de alienación entonces “fue envuelto con conceptos de la condición humana; (…) una fuerza positiva más que una fuerza negativa. Más que considerar a la alienación como estructurada por la “enajenación” de la naturaleza esencial de un ser humano, como resultado de un cruel conjunto de exigencias industrial-capitalistas la alienación se convierte en un derecho inalienable, una fuente de energía creativa para algunos y una expresión excentricidad personal para otros” (18).
[67] Marx y Engels, La ideología alemana, (Montevideo: Pueblos Unidos, 1959, págs. 33-35.
[68] Karl Marx, Trabajo asalariado y capital, Buenos Aires: Anteo, 1987, 26.
[69] Ibíd., 26-7.
[70] El dieciocho brumario de Luis Bonaparte, Revelaciones concernientes al Juicio Comunista de Colonia, y Revelaciones sobre la historia diplomática secreta del siglo XVIII.
[71] Karl Marx, Elementos fundamentales para la crítica de la economía política (borrador) 1857-1858, Buenos Aires: Siglo XXI, 1973, 84-5.
[72] Ibíd., 423.
[73] Karl Marx, Libro I, Capítulo VI inédito – Resultados del proceso inmediato de producción del capital, México: Siglo XXI, 1990, 20.
[74] Ibíd., 101.
[75] Ibíd., 96.
[76] Ibíd., 38 (subrayado en el original).
[77] Ibíd., 40.
[78] Ibíd., 96 (subrayado en el original).
[79] Ibíd., 98.
[80] Ver Marcello Musto, ed., Karl Marx’s Grundrisse: Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 years Later, Londres/Nueva York: Routledge, 2008, 177-280.
[81] Karl Marx, El capital Tomo I, 89.
[82] Ibíd., 88-9.
[83] Cf. Schaff, Alienation as a Social Phenomenon, 81.
[84] El capital , Tomo I, 96.
[85] Karl Marx, El capital, Tomo III, 1044.
[86] Por razones de espacio, se dejará para un futuro estudio la consideración de la naturaleza incompleta y parcialmente contradictoria del esbozo de Marx de una sociedad no alienada.

 

Bibliography
Arendt, Hannah, 2009. La condición humana, Buenos Aires: Paidós.
Axelos, Kostas, 1976. Alienation, Praxis, and Techne in the Thought of Karl Marx, Austin/Londres: University of Texas Press.
Baudrillard, Jean, 2009. La sociedad de consumo, Madrid: Siglo XXI.
Bell, Daniel, 1959. “The Rediscovery of Alienation: Some notes along the quest for the Historical Marx”, Journal of Philosophy, vol. LVI, N° 24, págs. 933-52.
Blauner, Robert, 1964. Alienation and Freedom, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Braverman, Harry, 1978. Lavoro e capitale monopolistico, Torino: Einaudi.
Clark, John, 1959. “Measuring alienation within a social System”, American Sociological Review, Vol. 24, N° 6, págs. 849-52.
D’Abbiero, Marcella, 1970. Alienazione in Hegel. Usi e significati di Entaeusserung, Entfremdung, Veraeusserung. Roma: Edizioni dell’Ateneo.
Debord, Guy, 2007. La sociedad del espectáculo, Rosario: Último Recurso.
Freud, Sigmund, 1962. Civilization and its Discontents, Nueva York: Norton.
Friedmann, Georges, 1964. The Anatomy of Work, Nueva York: Glencoe Press.
Fromm, Erich, 1965a. The Sane Society, Nueva York: Fawcett.
Fromm, Erich (ed.), 1966. “La aplicación del Psicoanálisis a la teoría de Marx”, en Humanismo socialista, Buenos Aires: Paidós.
Fromm, Erich, 1978. El concepto del hombre en Marx, México DF: F.C.E.
Geyer, Felix, 1982. “A General Systems Approach to Psychiatric and Sociological De-alienation”, en Giora Shoham (ed.) Alienation and Anomie Revisited, Tel Aviv: Ramot, págs. 139-74.
Geyer, Felix y Walter R. Heinz (eds.), 1992. Alienation, Society, and the Individual, New Brunswick/Londres: Transaction.
Geyer, Felix y David Schweitzer (eds.) 1976. “Introduction”, Theories of Alienation, Leiden: Martin Hijhoff.
Goldmann, Lucien, 1959. Recherches dialectiques, Paris: Gallimard.
Heidegger, Martín, Ser y tiempo, www.philosophia.cl /Escuela de Filosofía, Universidad ARCIS.
Heidegger, Martin, 1993. “Letter on Humanism”, en Basic Writings, Londres: Routledge.
Heinz, Walter R., 1992. “Changes in the Methodology of Alienation Research”, en Felix Geyer y Walter R. Heinz (ed.), Alienation, Society, and the Individual, New Brunswick/Londres: Transaction.
Horkheimer, Max y Adorno, W. Theodor, 1944. Dialéctica del iluminismo, Buenos Aires: Sudamericana.
Horowitz, Irving Louis, 1996. “The Strange Career of Alienation: how a concept is transformed without permission of its founders”, en Felix Geyer (ed.), Alienation, Ethnicity, and Postmodernism, Westport/Londres: Greenwood Press, págs. 17-20.
Horton, John, 1964. “The Dehumanization of Anomie and Alienation: a problem in the ideology of sociology”, The British Journal of Sociology, vol. XV, N° 4, págs. 283-300.
Hyppolite, Jean, 1969. Studies on Marx and Hegel, Nueva York/Londres: Basic Books.
Kaufmann, Walter, 1970. “The Inevitability of Alienation”, en Richard Schacht, 1970, Alienation, Garden City: Doubleday, págs. xv-lviii.
Kojève, Alexander, 1980. Introduction to the Reading of Hegel: Lectures on the Phenomenology of Spirit, Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
Lefebvre, Henri, 1967. Obras de Henri Lefebvre, Tomo I, Buenos Aires: Peña Lillo.
Ludz, Peter C. 1976. “Alienation as a Concept in the Social Sciences”, en Felix Geyer y David Schweitzer (eds.), Theories of Alienation, Leiden: Martinus Nijhoff, págs. 3-37.
Lukács, Georg, 1969. Historia y conciencia de clase, México DF: Grijalbo.
Marcuse, Herbert, 1985. Eros y Civilización, Buenos Aires: Ariel.
Marcuse, Herbert, 1970. Ética de la revolución, Madrid: Taurus.
Marx, Karl, 1965. “Contribución a la crítica de la filosofía del derecho de Hegel”, en Crítica de la filosofía del derecho de Hegel. Buenos Aires: Ediciones Nuevas.
Marx, Karl, 1973. Elementos fundamentales para la crítica de la economía política (borrador) 1857-1858, Buenos Aires: Siglo XXI.
Marx, Karl, 1983a. El capital, T. I. México DF: Siglo XXI.
Marx, Karl, 1983b. El capital, T. II. México DF: Siglo XXI.
Marx, Karl, 1987. Trabajo asalariado y capital, Buenos Aires: Anteo.
Marx, Karl, 1990. Libro I, Capítulo VI inédito – Resultados del proceso inmediato de producción del capital, México DF: Siglo XXI.
Marx, Karl, 1992, “Excerpts from James Mill’s Elements of Political Economy”, en Karl Marx, Early Writings, Londres: Penguin, págs. 259-78.
Marx, Karl, 2004. Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844, Buenos Aires: Colihue.
Marx, Karl, y Friedrich Engels, 1958. La ideología alemana, Montevideo: Pueblos Unidos.
Melman, Seymour, 1958. Decision-making and Productivity, Oxford: Basil Blackwell.
Mészáros, Istvan, 1970. Marx’s Theory of Alienation, Londres: Merlin Press.
Musto, Marcello (ed.), 2008. Karl Marx’s Grundrisse: Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 years Later, Londres/Nueva York: Routledge.
Nettler, Gwynn, 1957. “A Measure of Alienation”, American Sociological Review, vol. 22, N° 6, págs. 670-77.
Ollman, Bertell, 1971. Alienation, Garden City: Doubleday.
Rubin, Isaak Illich. 1974. Ensayos sobre la teoría marxista del valor, Buenos Aires: Pasado y Presente.
Schacht, Richard, 1970. Alienation, Garden City: Doubleday.
Schaff, Adam, 1980. Alienation as a Social Phenomenon, Oxford: Pergamon Press.
Schweitzer, David, 1996. “Alienation, De-alienation, and Change: a critical overview of current perspectives in Philosophy and the social sciences”, en Giora Shoham (ed.) Alienation and Anomie Revisited, Tel Aviv: Ramot, págs. 27-70.
Schweitzer, David, 1982. “Fetishization of Alienation: Unpacking a problem of Science, Knowledge, and Reified Practices in the Workplace”, en Felix Geyer (ed.) Alienation, Ethnicity, and Postmodernism, Westport/Londres: Greenwood press, págs. 21-36.
Seeman, Melvin, 1959. “On the Meaning of Alienation”, American Sociological Review, vol. 24, N° 6, págs. 783-91.
Seeman, Melvin, 1972. “Alienation and Engagement”, en Angus Campbell y Philip E. Converse (eds.) The Meaning of Social Change, Nueva York: Russell Sage, págs. 467-527.

Categories
Book chapter

Communism

I.  Critical Theories of the Early Socialists
In the wake of the French Revolution, numerous theories began to circulate in Europe that sought both to respond to demands for social justice unanswered by the French Revolution and to correct the dramatic economic imbalances brought about by the spread of the industrial revolution.
The democratic gains following the capture of the Bastille delivered a decisive blow to the aristocracy, but they left almost unchanged the inequality of wealth between the popular and the dominant classes. The decline of the monarchy and the establishment of the republic were not sufficient to reduce poverty in France.
This was the context in which the ‘critical-utopian’ theories of socialism,1 as Marx and Engels defined them in the Manifesto of the Communist Party (1848), rose to prominence. They considered them ‘utopian’2 for two reasons: first, their exponents, in different ways, opposed the existing social order and furnished theories containing what they believed to be ‘the most valuable elements for the enlightenment of the working class’;3 and, second, they claimed that an alternative form of social organization could be achieved simply through the theoretical identification of new ideas and principles, rather than through the concrete struggle of the working class. According to Marx and Engels, their socialist predecessors had believed that
historical action [had] to yield to their personal inventive action, historically created conditions of emancipation to fantastic ones, and the gradual spontaneous class organization of the proletariat to an organization of society specially contrived by these inventors. Future history resolve[d] itself, in their eyes, into the propaganda and the practical carrying out of their social plans.4
In the most widely read political text in human history, Marx and Engels also took issue with many other forms of socialism both past and present, grouping them under the headings of ‘feudal’, ‘petty-bourgeois’, ‘bourgeois’ or – in disparagement of its ‘philosophical phraseology’ – ‘German’ socialism.5 In general, these theories could be related to one another either in terms of an aspiration to ‘restore the old means of production and exchange, and with them the old property relations and the old society’, or in terms of an attempt to ‘cramp the modern means of production and exchange within the framework of the old property relations’ from which they had broken. For this reason, Marx saw in these conceptions a form of socialism that was both ‘reactionary and utopian’.6
The term ‘utopian’, as opposed to ‘scientific’ socialism, has often been used in a misleading and intentionally disparaging way. In fact, the ‘utopian socialists’ contested the social organization of the age in which they lived, contributing through their writings and actions to the critique of existing economic relations.7 Marx had considerable respect for his precursors:8 he stressed the huge gap separating Saint-Simon (1760-1825) from his cruder interpreters;9 and, whilst he regarded some of Charles Fourier’s (1771-1858) ideas as extravagant ‘humorous sketches’,10 he saw ‘great merit’ in the realization that the transformative aim for labour was to overcome not only the existing mode of distribution but also the ‘mode of production’.11 In Owen’s theories he saw many elements that were worthy of interest and anticipated the future. In Wages, Price and Profit (1865) he noted that already at the beginning of the nineteenth century, in Observations on the Effect of the Manufacturing System (1815), Owen had ‘proclaimed a general limitation of the working day as the first preparatory step to the emancipation of the working class’.12 He had also argued, like no one else, in favour of cooperative production.
Nevertheless, while recognizing the positive influence of Saint-Simon, Fourier and Owen on the nascent workers’ movement, Marx’s overall assessment of their ideas was negative. He thought that they hoped to solve the social problems of the age with unrealizable fantasies, and he criticized them heavily for spending much of their time on the irrelevant theoretical exercise of building ‘castles in the air’.13
Marx did not take exception only to proposals that he considered wrong or impractical. Above all, he opposed the idea that social change could come about through a priori meta-historical models inspired by dogmatic precepts. The moralism of the early socialists also came in for criticism.14 In his ‘Conspectus on Bakunin’s Statism and Anarchy’ (1874-75), he reproached ‘utopian socialism’  with seeking ‘to foist new illusions onto the people instead of confining its scientific investigations to the social movement created by the people itself’.15 In his view, the conditions for revolution could not be imported from outside.

II.  Equality, Theoretical Systems and Future Society: Errors of the Precursors
After 1789, many theorists contended with one another in outlining a new and more just social order, over and above the fundamental political changes that had come with the end of the Ancien Regime. One of the commonest positions assumed that all the ills of society would cease as soon as a system of government based on absolute equality among all its components had been established.
This idea of a primordial, and in many respects dictatorial, communism was the guiding principle of the Conspiracy of Equals that developed in 1796 to subvert the ruling French Directorate. In the Manifesto of the Equals (1795), Sylvain Maréchal (1750-1803) argued that ‘since all have the same faculties and the same wants’, there should be  ‘the same education [and] the same nourishment’ for all. ‘Why,’ he asked, ‘ should not the like portion and the same quality of food suffice for each according to their wants?’16 The leading figure in the conspiracy of 1796, François-Noël Babeuf (1760-1797), held that application of ‘the great principle of equality’ would greatly extend the ‘circle of humanity’ so that ‘frontiers, customs barriers and evil governments’ would ‘gradually disappear’.17
The vision of a society based on strict economic equality re-emerged in French communist writing in the period after the Revolution of July 1830. In The Voyage to Icaria (1840), a political manifesto written in the form of a novel, Étienne Cabet (1788-1856) depicted a model community in which there would no longer be ‘property, money, or buying and selling’, and human beings would be ‘equal in everything’.18 In this ‘second promised land’,19 the law would regulate almost every aspect of life: ‘every house [would have] four floors’20 and ‘everyone [would be] dressed in the same way’.21
Relations of strict equality are also prefigured in the work of Théodore Dézamy (1808-1871). In the Community Code (1842), he speaks of a world ‘divided into communes, as equal, regular and united as possible’, in which there would be ‘a single kitchen’ and ‘one common dormitory’ for all children. The whole citizenry would live as ‘a family in one single household’.22
Similar views to those circulating in France also took root in Germany. In Humanity As It Is and As It Should Be (1838), Wilhelm Weitling (1808-1871) foresaw that the elimination of private property would automatically put an end to egoism, which he simplistically regarded as the main cause of all social problems. In his eyes, ‘the community of goods’ would be ‘the means to the redemption of humanity, transforming the earth into paradise’ and immediately bringing about ‘enormous abundance’.23
All the thinkers who projected such visions fell into the same dual error: they took it for granted that the adoption of a new social model based on strict equality could be the solution for all the problems of society; and they convinced themselves, in defiance of all economic laws, that all that was necessary to achieve it was the imposition of certain measures from on high, whose effects would not later be altered by the course of the economy.
Alongside this naive egalitarian ideology, based on an assurance that all social disparities among human beings could be eliminated with ease, was another conviction equally widespread amongst the early socialists: many believed that it was sufficient to theoretically devise a better system of social organization in order to change the world. Numerous reform projects were therefore elaborated in minute detail, setting out their authors’ theses for the restructuring of society. The priority, in their eyes, was to find the correct formulation, which, once discovered, citizens would then willingly accept as a matter of common sense and gradually implement in reality.
Saint-Simon was one of those who clung to this conviction. In 1819 he wrote in the periodical L’Organisateur (The Organizer): ‘The old system will cease to operate when ideas about how to replace existing institutions with others […] have been sufficiently clarified, pooled and harmonized, and when they have been approved by public opinion.’24 However, Saint-Simon’s views about the society of the future are surprising, and disarming, in their vagueness. In the unfinished New Christianity (1824) he stated that the ‘political disease of the age’ – which caused ‘suffering to all workers useful to society’ and allowed ‘sovereigns to absorb a large part of the wages of the poor’ – depended on the ‘feeling of egoism’. Since this had become ‘dominant in all classes and all individuals’,25 he looked ahead to the birth of a new social organization based on a single guiding principle: ‘all men must behave with one another as brothers’.26
Fourier declared that human existence was grounded upon universal laws, which, once activated, would guarantee joy and delight all over the earth. In his Theory of the Four Movements (1808), he set out what he unhesitatingly called the most ‘important discovery [among] all the scientific work done since the human race began’.27 Fourier opposed advocates of the ‘commercial system’ and maintained that society would be free only when all its components had returned to expressing their passions.28 The main error of the political regime of his age was the repression of human nature.29
Alongside radical egalitarianism and a quest for the best possible social model, a final element common to many early socialists was their dedication to promoting the birth of small alternative communities. For those who organized them, the liberation of these communes from the economic inequalities existing at the time would provide a decisive impetus for the spread of socialist principles and make it easier to argue in their favour.
In The New Industrial and Societal World (1829), Fourier envisaged a novel community structure in which villages would be ‘replaced with industrial phalanges of roughly 1800 persons each’30 Individuals would live in phalansteries, that is, in large buildings with communal areas where they could enjoy all the services they needed. According to the method invented by Fourier, human beings would ‘flutter from pleasure to pleasure and avoid excesses’; they would have brief spells of employment, ‘two hours at the most’, so that each would be able to exercise ‘seven to eight attractive kinds of work in the course of the day’.31
The search for better ways of organizing society also spurred on Owen, who, over the course of his life, founded important experiments in workers’ cooperation. First at New Lanark, Scotland from 1800 to 1825, then at New Harmony in the United States from 1826 to 1828, he tried to demonstrate in actual practice how to realize a more just social order.   In The Book of the New Moral World (1836-1844), however, Owen proposed the division of society into eight classes, the last of which ‘will consist of those from forty to sixty years complete’, who would have the ‘final decision’. What he envisaged, rather naively, was that in this gerontocratic system everyone would be able and willing to assume their due role in the governance of society ‘without contest, his fair, full share of the government of society’.32
In 1849 Cabet, too, founded a colony in the United States, at Nauvoo, Illinois, but his authoritarianism gave rise to numerous internal conflicts. In the laws of the ‘Icarian Constitution’, he proposed as a condition for the birth of community that, ‘in order to increase all the prospects of success’, he should be appointed ‘sole and absolute Director for a period of ten years, with the power to run it on the basis of his doctrine and ideas’.33
The experiments of the early socialists – whether the lovingly devised phalansteries or the sporadic cooperatives or the eccentric communist colonies – proved so inadequate that their implementation on a wider scale could not be seriously contemplated. They involved a derisory number of workers and often very limited participation of the collective in policy decisions. Moreover, many of the revolutionaries (non-English ones, in particular) who devoted their efforts to building such communities did not understand the fundamental changes in production that were taking place in their age. Many of the early socialists failed to see the connection between the development of capitalism and the potential for social progress for the working class. Such progress depended on the workers’ capacity to appropriate the wealth they generated in the new mode of production.34

III. Where and why Marx wrote about communism
Marx set himself a completely different task from that of previous socialists; his absolute priority was to ‘reveal the economic law of motion of modern society’.35 His aim was to develop a comprehensive critique of the capitalist mode of production, which would serve the proletariat, the principal revolutionary subject, in the overthrow of the existing social-economic system.
Moreover, having no wish to inculcate a new religion, Marx refrained from promoting an idea which he considered theoretically pointless and politically counter-productive: a universal model of communist society. For this reason, in the ‘Postface to the Second Edition’ (1873) of Capital, Volume I (1867), he made it clear that he had no interest in ‘writing recipes for the cook-shops of the future’.36 He also outlined what he meant by this well-known assertion in the ‘Marginal Notes on Wagner’ (1879-80), where, in response to criticism from the German economist Adolph Wagner (1835-1917), he categorically stated that he had ‘never established a ‘socialist system’’.37
Marx made similar declarations in his political writings. In The Civil War in France (1871), he wrote of the Paris Commune, the first seizure of power by the subaltern classes: ‘The working class did not expect miracles from the Commune. They have no ready-made utopias to introduce by a decree of the people.’ Rather, the emancipation of the proletariat had ‘to pass through long struggles, through a series of historic processes, transforming circumstances and men’. The point was not to ‘realize ideals’ but ‘to set free elements of the new society with which old collapsing bourgeois society itself is pregnant’.38
Finally, Marx said much the same in his correspondence with leaders of the European workers’ movement. In 1881, for instance, when Ferdinand Domela Nieuwenhuis (1846-1919), the leading representative of the Social-Democratic League in the Netherlands, asked him what measures a revolutionary government would have to take after assuming power in order to establish a socialist society, Marx replied that he had always regarded such questions as ‘fallacious’ arguing instead that ‘what is to be done … at any particular moment depends, of course, wholly and entirely on the actual historical circumstances in which action is to be taken.’ He contended that it was impossible ‘to solve an equation that does not comprise within its terms the elements of its solution’; ‘a doctrinaire and of necessity fantastic anticipation of a future revolution’s programme of action only serves to distract from the present struggle.’39
Nevertheless, contrary to what many commentators have wrongly claimed, Marx did develop, in both published and unpublished form, a number of discussions about communist society which appear in three kinds of text. First, there are those in which Marx criticized ideas that he regarded as theoretically mistaken and liable to mislead socialists of his time. Some parts of the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 and The German Ideology; the chapter on ‘Socialist and Communist Literature’ in the Manifesto of the Communist Party; the criticisms of Pierre-Joseph Proudhon in the Grundrisse, the Urtext and the Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy; the texts of the early 1870s directed against anarchism; and the theses critical of Ferdinand Lassalle (1825-1864) in the Critique of the Gotha Programme (1875) belong to this category. To these should be added the critical remarks on Proudhon, Lassalle and the anarchist component of the International Working Men’s Association scattered throughout Marx’s vast correspondence.
The second kind of text is the militant writings and political propaganda written for working-class organizations. In these, Marx tried to provide more concrete indications about the society for which they were fighting and the instruments necessary to construct it.  This group comprises the Manifesto of the Communist Party, the resolutions, reports and addresses for the International Working Men’s Association – including Value, Price and Profit and The Civil War in France – and various journalistic articles, public lectures, speeches, letters to militants, and other short documents such as the Minimum Programme of the French Workers’ Party.
The third and final group of texts, which are centered around capitalism, contain Marx’s lengthiest and most detailed discussions of the features of communist society. Important chapters of Capital and the numerous preparatory manuscripts, particularly the highly valuable Grundrisse, contain some of his most salient ideas on socialism. It was precisely his critical observations on aspects of the existing mode of production that prompted reflections on communist society, and it is no accident that in some cases successive pages of his work alternate between these two themes.40
A close study of Marx’s discussions of communism allow us to distinguish his own conception from that of twentieth-century regimes who, while claiming to act in his name, perpetrated a series of crimes and atrocities. In this way, it is possible to relocate the Marxian political project within the horizon that corresponds to it: the struggle for the emancipation of what Saint-Simon called ‘the poorest and most numerous class’.41
Marx’s notes on communism should not be thought of as a model to be adhered to dogmatically,42 still less as solutions to be indiscriminately applied in diverse times and places. Yet these sketches constitute a priceless theoretical treasure, still useful today for the critique of capitalism.

IV. The limits of the initial formulations
Contrary to the claims made by a certain type of Marxist-Leninist propaganda, Marx’s theories were the result not of some innate wisdom but of a long process of conceptual and political refinement. Intense study of economics and many other disciplines, together with observation of actual historical events, particularly the Paris Commune, was extremely important for the development of his thoughts on communist society.
Some of Marx’s early writings – many of which he never completed or published – are often surprisingly regarded as syntheses of his most significant ideas,43 but in fact they display all the limits of his initial conception of post-capitalist society.
In the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, Marx wrote of these matters in highly abstract terms, since he had not yet been able to expand his economic studies and had had little political experience at the time. At some points, he described ‘communism’ as the ‘negation of the negation’, as a ‘moment of the Hegelian dialectic’: ‘the positive expression of the annulled private property’.44 At others, however, inspired by Ludwig Feuerbach (1804-1872), he wrote that:
communism, as fully developed naturalism, equals humanism, and as fully developed humanism equals naturalism; it is the genuine resolution of the conflict between man and nature and between man and man — the true resolution of the strife between existence and essence, between objectification and self-confirmation, between freedom and necessity, between the individual and the species.45
Various passages in the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 were influenced by the theological matrix of Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel’s (1770-1831) philosophy of history: for example, the argument that ‘the entire movement of history [had been] communism’s actual act of genesis’; or that communism was ‘the riddle of history solved’, which ‘knew itself to be this solution’.46
Similarly, The German Ideology, which Marx wrote with Engels and was intended to include texts by other authors,47 contains a famous quotation that has sown great confusion among exegetes of Marx’s work. On one unfinished page we read that whereas in capitalist society, with its division of labour, every human being ‘has a particular, exclusive sphere of activity’, in communist society:
society regulates the general production and thus makes it possible for me to do one thing today and another tomorrow, to hunt in the morning, fish in the afternoon, rear cattle in the evening, criticize after dinner, just as I have a mind, without ever becoming hunter, fisherman, shepherd or critic.48
Many authors, both Marxist and anti-Marxist, have ingenuously believed that this was the main feature of communist society for Marx – a view they could hold because of their relative unfamiliarity with Capital and various important political texts. Despite the plethora of analysis and discussion regarding the manuscript of 1845-46, they did not realize that this passage was a reformulation of an old – and rather well-known – idea of Charles Fourier’s,49 which was taken up by Engels but rejected by Marx.50
Despite these evident limitations, The German Ideology represented indubitable progress over the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844. Whereas the latter was informed by the idealism of the Hegelian Left – the group of which he had been part until 1842 – and lacked any concrete political discussion, the former now maintained that ‘it is possible to achieve real liberation only in the real world and by real means’. Communism, therefore, should not be regarded as ‘a state of affairs to be established, an ideal to which reality will have to adjust itself, [but as] the real movement which abolishes the present state of things’.51
In The German Ideology, Marx also drew a first sketch of the economy of future society. Whereas previous revolutions had produced only ‘a new distribution of labour to other persons’,52
Communism differs from all previous movements in that it overturns the basis of all earlier relations of production and intercourse, and for the first time consciously treats all naturally evolved premises as the creations of hitherto existing men, strips them of their natural character and subjugates them to the power of the united individuals. Its organization is therefore essentially economic, the material production of the conditions of this unity.53
Marx also stated that ‘empirically, communism is only possible as the act of the dominant peoples “all at once” and simultaneously’. In his view, this presupposed both ‘the universal development of productive forces’ and ‘the world intercourse bound up with them’.54 Furthermore, Marx confronted for the first time a fundamental political theme that he would take up again in the future: the advent of communism as the end of class tyranny. For the revolution would ‘abolish the rule of all classes with the classes themselves, because it is carried through by the class which no longer counts as a class in society, which is not recognized as a class, and is in itself the expression of the dissolution of all classes, nationalities’.55
Marx continued, together with Engels, to develop his reflections on post-capitalist society in the Manifesto of the Communist Party. In this text, which, in its profound analysis of the changes effected by capitalism, towered above the rough and ready socialist literature of the time, the most interesting points on communism concern property relations. Marx observed that their radical transformation was ‘not at all a distinctive feature of communism’, since other new modes of production in history had also brought that about. For Marx, in opposition to all the propaganda claims that communists would prevent personal appropriation of the fruits of labour, the ‘distinguishing feature of communism’ was ‘not the abolition of property generally, but the abolition of bourgeois property’,56 of ‘the power to appropriate the products of society […] to subjugate the labour of others’.57 In his eyes, the ‘theory of the communists’ could be summed up in one sentence: ‘the abolition of private property’.58
In the Manifesto of the Communist Party, Marx also proposed a list of ten preliminary benchmarks to be achieved in the most advanced economies following the conquest of power. They included ‘abolition of property in land and application of all rents of land to public purposes’;59 the centralization of credit in the hands of the state, by means of a national bank […]; the centralization of the means of communication and transport in the hands of the state […]; free education for all children in public schools’, but also ‘abolition of all right of inheritance’, a Saint-Simonian measure that Marx later firmly rejected.60
As in the case of the manuscripts written between 1844 and 1846, it would be a mistake to regard the measures listed in the Manifesto of the Communist Party – drafted when Marx was just thirty – as his finished vision of post-capitalist society.61 The complete maturation of his thought would require many more years of study and political experiences.

V.  Communism as Free Association
In Capital, Volume I, Marx argued that capitalism was a ‘historically determined’62 social mode of production in which the labour product was transformed into a commodity, with the result that individuals had value only as producers, and human existence was subjugated to the act of the ‘production of commodities’.63 Hence ‘the process of production’ had ‘mastery over man, instead of being controlled by him’.64 Capital ‘care[d] nothing for the length of life of labour power’ and attached no importance to improvements in the living conditions of the proletariat. Capital ‘attains this objective by shortening the life of labour-power, in the same way as a greedy farmer snatches more produce from the soil by robbing it of its fertility.”65
In the Grundrisse, Marx recalled that in capitalism, ‘since the aim of labour is not a particular product [with a relation] to the particular needs of the individual, but money […], the industriousness of the individual has no limits’.66 In such a society, ‘the whole time of an individual is posited as labour time, and he is consequently degraded to a mere labourer, subsumed under labour.’67 Bourgeois ideology, however, presents this as if the individual enjoys greater freedom and is protected by impartial legal norms capable of guaranteeing justice and equity. Paradoxically, despite the fact that the economy has developed to such a level that it can allow the whole society to live in better conditions than before, ‘the most developed machinery now compels the labourer to work for a longer time than the savage does, or than the labourer himself did when he was using the simplest, crudest implements’.68
By contrast, Marx’s vision of communism was of ‘an association of free individuals [ein Verein freier Menschen], working with the means of production held in common, and expending their many different forms of labour-power in full self-awareness as one single social labour force.’69 Similar definitions are present in many of Marx’s writings. In the Grundrisse, he wrote that postcapitalist society would be based upon ‘collective production [gemeinschaftliche Produktion]’.70
In the Economic Manuscripts of 1863-1867, he spoke of the ‘passage from the capitalist mode of production to the mode of production of associated labour [Produktionsweise der assoziierten Arbeit]’.71 And in the Critique of the Gotha Programme, he defined the social organization ‘based on common ownership of the means of production’ as ‘cooperative society [genossenschaftliche Gesellschaft]’.72
In Capital, Volume I, Marx explained that the ‘ruling principle’ of this ‘higher form of society’ would be ‘the full and free development of every individual’.73 In The Civil War in France, he expressed his approval of the measures taken by the Communards, which ‘betoken[ed] the tendency of a government of the people by the people’.74 To be more precise, in his evaluation of the political reforms of the Paris Commune, he asserted that ‘the old centralized Government would in the provinces, too, have to give way to the self-government of the producers’.75 The expression recurs in the ‘Conspectus of Bakunin’s Statism and Anarchy’, where he maintained that radical social change would ‘start with self-government of the communities’.76 Marx’s idea of society, therefore, is the antithesis of the totalitarian systems that emerged in his name in the twentieth century. His writings are useful for an understanding not only of how capitalism works but also of the failure of socialist experiences until today.
In referring to so-called free competition, or the seemingly equal positions of workers and capitalists on the market in bourgeois society, Marx stated that the reality was totally different from the human freedom exalted by apologists of capitalism. The system posed a huge obstacle to democracy, and he showed better than anyone else that the workers did not receive an equivalent for what they produced.77 In the Grundrisse, he explained that what was presented as an ‘exchange of equivalents’ was, in fact, appropriation of the workers’ ‘labour time without exchange’; the relationship of exchange ‘completely disappeared’, or it became a ‘mere semblance’.78 Relations between persons were ‘actuated only by self-interest’. This ‘clash of individuals’ had been passed off as the ‘the absolute form of existence of free individuality in the sphere of production and exchange’. But for Marx ‘nothing could be further from the truth’, since ‘in free competition, it is capital that is set free, not the individuals’.79 In the Economic Manuscripts of 1863-1867, he denounced the fact that ‘surplus labour is initially pocketed, in the name of society, by the capitalist’ – the surplus labour that is ‘the basis of society’s free time’ and, by virtue of this, the ‘material basis of its whole development and of civilization in general’.80 And in Capital, Volume I, he showed that the wealth of the bourgeoisie was possible only ‘by converting the whole lifetime of the masses into labour time’.81
In the Grundrisse, Marx observed that in capitalism ‘individuals are subsumed under social production’, which ‘exists outside them as their fate’.82 This happens only through the attribution of exchange-value conferred on the products, whose buying and selling takes place post festum.83 Furthermore, ‘all social powers of production’ – including scientific discoveries, which appear as ‘alien and external’ to the worker84 – are posited by capital. The very association of the workers, at the places and in the act of production, is ‘operated by capital’ and is therefore ‘only formal’. Use of the goods created by the workers ‘is not mediated by exchange between mutually independent labours or products of labour’, but rather ‘by the circumstances of social production within which the individual carries on his activity’.85 Marx explained how productive activity in the factory ‘concerns only the product of labour, not labour itself’,86 since it is ‘confined to a common place of work under the direction of overseers, regimentation, greater discipline, consistency, and a posited dependence on capital in production itself’.87
In communist society, by contrast, production would be ‘directly social’, ‘the offspring of association distributing labour within itself’. It would be managed by individuals as their ‘common wealth’.88 The ‘social character of production’ (gesellschaftliche Charakter der Produktion) would ‘from the outset make the product into a communal, general one’; its associative character would be ‘presupposed’ and ‘the labour of the individual […]  from the outset taken as social labour’.89 As Marx stressed in the Critique of the Gotha Programme, in postcapitalist society ‘individual labour no longer exists in an indirect fashion but directly as a component part of the total labour.’90 In addition, the workers would be able to create the conditions for the eventual disappearance of ‘the enslaving subordination of the individual to the division of labour’.91
In Capital, Volume I, Marx emphasized that in bourgeois society ‘the worker exists for the process of production, and not the process of production for the worker’.92 Moreover, in parallel to exploitation of the workers, there developed exploitation of the environment. In contrast to interpretations that reduce Marx’s conception of communist society to the mere development of productive forces, he displayed great interest in what we would now call the ecological question.93 He repeatedly denounced the fact that ‘all profess in capitalist agriculture is a progress in the art, not only of robbing the worker but of robbing the soil’ . This threatens both of ‘the original sources of all wealth – the soil and the worker’.94
In communism, the conditions would be created for a form of ‘planned cooperation’ through which the worker ‘strips off the fetters of his individuality and develops the capabilities of his species’.95 In Capital, Volume II, Marx pointed out that society would then be in a position to ‘reckon in advance how much labour, means of production and means of subsistence it can spend, without dislocation’, unlike in capitalism ‘where any kind of social rationality asserts itself only post festum’ and  ‘major disturbances can and must occur constantly’.96 In some passages of Capital, Volume III, too, Marx clarified differences between a socialist mode of production and a market-based one, foreseeing the birth of a society ‘organized as a conscious association’.97 ‘It is only where production is under the actual, predetermining control of society that the latter establishes a relation between the volume of social labour time applied in producing definite articles, and the volume of the social want to be satisfied by these articles’.98
Finally, in his marginal notes on Adolf Wagner’s Treatise on Political Economy, Marx makes it clear that in communist society ‘the sphere [volume] of production’ will have to be ‘rationally regulated’.99 This will also make it possible to eliminate the waste due to the ‘anarchical system of competition’, which, through its recurrent structural crises, not only involves the ‘most outrageous squandering of labour power and the social means of production’100 but is incapable of solving the contradictions stemming essentially from the ‘capitalist use of machinery’.101

VI. Common ownership and free time
Contrary to the view of many of Marx’s socialist contemporaries, a redistribution of consumption goods was not sufficient to reverse this state of affairs. A root-and-branch change in the productive assets of society was necessary. Thus, in the Grundrisse Marx noted that ‘to leave wage labour and at the same time to abolish capital [was] a self-contradictory and self-negating demand’.102 What was required was ‘dissolution of the mode of production and form of society based upon exchange value’.103 In the address published under the title Value, Price and Profit, he called on workers to ‘inscribe on their banner’ not ‘the conservative motto: ‘A fair day’s wage for a fair day’s work!’ [but] the revolutionary watchword: ‘Abolition of the wages system!’’104
Furthermore, the Critique of the Gotha Programme made the point that in the capitalist mode of production ‘the material conditions of production are in the hands of non-workers in the form of capital and land ownership, while the masses are only owners of the personal condition of production, of labour power’.105 Therefore, it was essential to overturn the property relations at the base of the bourgeois mode of production. In the Grundrisse, Marx recalled that ‘the laws of private property – liberty, equality, property – property in one’s own labour and the ability to freely dispose of it – are inverted into the propertylessness of the worker and the alienation of his labour, his relation to it as alien property and vice versa’.106 And in 1869, in a report of the General Council of the International Working Men’s Association, he asserted that ‘private property in the means of production’ served to give the bourgeois class ‘the power to live without labour upon other people’s labour’.107 He repeated this point in another short political text, the Preamble to the Programme of the French Workers’ Party, adding that ‘the producers cannot be free unless they are in possession of the means of production’ and that the goal of the proletarian struggle must be ‘the return of all the means of production to collective ownership’.108
In Capital, Volume III, Marx observed that when the workers had established a communist mode of production ‘private property of the earth by single individuals [would] appear just as absurd as private property of one human being by another’. He directed his most radical critique against the destructive possession inherent in capitalism, insisting that ‘even an entire society, a nation, or even all simultaneously existing societies taken together, are not the owners of the earth’. For Marx, human beings were ‘only its possessors, its usufructuaries, and they have to bequeath it [the planet] in an improved state to succeeding generations, like good heads of the household [boni patres familias]’.109
A different kind of ownership of the means of production would also radically change the life-time of society. In Capital, Volume I, Marx unfolded with complete clarity the reasons why in capitalism ‘the shortening of the working day is […] by no means what is aimed at, in capitalist production, when labour is economized by increasing its productivity’.110 The time that the progress of science and technology makes available for individuals is in reality immediately converted into surplus value. The only aim of the dominant class is the ‘shortening of the labour-time necessary for the production of a definite quantity of commodities’. Its only purpose in developing the productive forces is the ‘shortening of that part of the working day in which the worker must work for himself, and the lengthening […] the other part […] in which he is free to work for nothing for the capitalist’.111 This system differs from slavery or the corvées due to the feudal lord, since ‘surplus labour and necessary labour are mingled together’112 and make the reality of exploitation harder to perceive.
In the Grundrisse, Marx showed that ‘free time for the few’ is possible only because of this surplus labour time of the many.113 The bourgeoisie secures growth of its material and cultural capabilities only thanks to the limitation of those of the proletariat. The same happens in the most advanced capitalist countries, to the detriment of those on the periphery of the system. In the Manuscripts of 1861-1863, Marx emphasized that the ‘free development’ of the dominant class is ‘based on the restriction of development’ among the working class’; ‘the surplus labour of the workers’ is the ‘natural basis of the social development of the other section’. The surplus labour time of the workers is not only the pillar supporting the ‘material conditions of life’ for the bourgeoisie; it also creates the conditions for its ‘free time, the sphere of [its] development’. Marx could not have put it better: ‘the free time of one section corresponds to the time in thrall to labour of the other section.’114
Communist society, by contrast, would be characterized by a general reduction in labour time. In the ‘Instructions for the Delegates of the Provisional General Council’, composed in August 1866, Marx wrote in forthright terms: ‘A preliminary condition, without which all further attempts at improvement and emancipation must prove abortive, is the limitation of the working day.’ It was needed not only ‘to restore the health and physical energies of the working class’ but also ‘to secure them the possibility of intellectual development, sociable intercourse, social and political action’.115 Similarly, in Capital, Volume I, while noting that workers’ ‘time for education, for intellectual development, for the fulfilling of social functions, for social intercourse, for the free play of the vital forces of his body and his mind ’ counted as pure  ‘foolishness’ in the eyes of the capitalist class,116 Marx implied that these would be the basic elements of the new society. As he put it in the Grundrisse, a reduction in the hours devoted to labour – and not only labour to create surplus value for the capitalist class – would favour ‘the artistic, scientific, etc., development of individuals, made possible by the time thus set free and the means produced for all of them’.117
On the basis of these convictions, Marx identified the ‘economy of time [and] the planned distribution of labour time over the various branches of production’ as ‘the first economic law [of] communal production’.118 In Theories of Surplus Value (1862-63) he made it even clearer that ‘real wealth’ was nothing other than ‘disposable time’. In communist society, workers’ self-management would ensure that ‘a greater quantity of time’ was ‘not absorbed in direct productive labour but […] available for enjoyment, for leisure, thus giving scope for free activity and development’.119 In this text, so too in the Grundrisse, Marx quoted a short anonymous pamphlet entitled The Source and Remedy of the National Difficulties, Deduced from Principles of Political Economy, in a Letter to Lord John Russell (1821), whose definition of well-being he fully shared: that is, ‘A nation is truly rich if the working day is six hours rather than twelve. Wealth is not command over surplus labour time’ (real wealth) ‘but disposable time, in addition to that employed in immediate production, for every individual and for the whole society.’120 Elsewhere in the Grundrisse he asks rhetorically: ‘What is wealth if not the universality of the individual’s needs, capacities, enjoyments, productive forces? […] What is it if not the absolute unfolding of man’s creative abilities?’121 It is evident, then, that the socialist model in Marx’s mind did not involve a state of generalized poverty, but rather the attainment of greater collective wealth.

VII. Role of the state, individual rights and freedoms
In communist society, along with transformative changes in the economy, the role of the state and the function of politics would also have to be redefined. In The Civil War in France, Marx was at pains to explain that, after the conquest of power, the working class would have to fight to ‘uproot the economical foundations upon which rests the existence of classes, and therefore of class rule.’ Once ‘labour was emancipated, every man would become a working man, and productive labour [would] cease to be a class attribute.’122 The well-known statement that ‘the working class cannot simply lay hold of the ready-made state machinery and wield it for its own purposes’ was meant to signify, as Marx and Engels clarified in the booklet Fictitious Splits in the International, that ‘the functions of government [should] become simple administrative functions’.123 And in a concise formulation in his Conspectus on Bakunin’s Statism and Anarchy, Marx insisted that ‘the distribution of general functions [should] become a routine matter which entails no domination’.124 This would, as far as possible, avoid the danger that the exercise of political duties generated new dynamics of domination and subjugation.
Marx believed that, with the development of modern society, ‘state power [had] assumed more and more the character of the national power of capital over labour, of a public force organized for social enslavement, of an engine of class despotism’.125 In communism, by contrast, the workers would have to prevent the state from becoming an obstacle to full emancipation. It would be necessary to ‘amputate’ ‘the merely repressive organs of the old governmental power, [to wrest] its legitimate functions from an authority usurping pre-eminence over society itself, and restore [them] to the responsible agents of society’.126 In the Critique of the Gotha Programme, Marx observed that ‘freedom consists in converting the state from an organ superimposed upon society into one completely subordinate to it’, and shrewdly added that ‘forms of state are more free or less free to the extent that they restrict the ‘freedom of the state’’.127
In the same text, Marx underlined the demand that, in communist society, public policies should prioritize the ‘collective satisfaction of needs’. Spending on schools, healthcare and other common goods would ‘grow considerably in comparison with present-day society and grow in proportion as the new society develop[ed]’.128 Education would assume front-rank importance and – as he had pointed out in The Civil War in France, referring to the model adopted by the Communards in 1871 – ‘all the educational institutions [would be] opened to the people gratuitously and […] cleared of all interference of Church and State’. Only in this way would culture be ‘made accessible to all’ and ‘science itself freed from the fetters which class prejudice and governmental force had imposed upon it’.129
Unlike liberal society, where ‘equal right’ leaves existing inequalities intact, in communist society ‘right would have to be unequal rather than equal’. A change in this direction would recognize, and protect, individuals on the basis of their specific needs and the greater or lesser hardship of their conditions, since ‘they would not be different individuals if they were not unequal’. Furthermore, it would be possible to determine each person’s fair share of services and the available wealth. The society that aimed to follow the principle ‘From each according to their abilities, to each according to their needs’130 had before it this intricate road fraught with difficulties. However, the final outcome was not guaranteed by some ‘magnificent progressive destiny’ (in the words of Leopardi), nor was it irreversible.
Marx attached a fundamental value to individual freedom, and his communism was radically different from the levelling of classes envisaged by his various predecessors or pursued by many of his epigones. In the Urtext, however, he pointed to the ‘folly of those socialists (especially French socialists)’ who, considering  ‘socialism to be the realization of [bourgeois] ideas, […] purport[ed] to demonstrate that exchange and exchange value, etc., were originally […] a system of the freedom and equality of all, but [later] perverted by money [and] capital’131 In the Grundrisse, he labelled it an ‘absurdity’ to regard ‘free competition as the ultimate development of human freedom’; it was tantamount to a belief that ‘the rule of the bourgeoisie is the terminal point of world history’, which he mockingly described as ‘an agreeable thought for the parvenus of the day before yesterday’.132
In the same way, Marx contested the liberal ideology according to which ‘the negation of free competition [was] equivalent to the negation of individual freedom and of social production based upon individual freedom’. In bourgeois society, the only possible ‘free development’ was ‘on the limited basis of the domination of capital’. But that ‘type of individual freedom’ was, at the same time, ‘the most sweeping abolition of all individual freedom and the complete subjugation of individuality to social conditions which assume the form of objective powers, indeed of overpowering objects […] independent of the individuals relating to one another.’133
The alternative to capitalist alienation was achievable only if the subaltern classes became aware of their condition as new slaves and embarked on a struggle to radically transform the world in which they were exploited. Their mobilization and active participation in this process could not stop, however, on the day after the conquest of power. It would have to continue, in order to avert any drift toward the kind of state socialism that Marx always opposed with the utmost tenacity and conviction.
In 1868, in a significant letter to the president of the General Association of German Workers, Marx explained that in Germany, ‘where the worker is regulated bureaucratically from childhood onwards, where he believes in authority, in those set over him, the main thing is to teach him to walk by himself.’134 He never changed this conviction throughout his life and it is not by chance that the first point of his draft of the Statutes of the International Working Men’s Association states: ‘The emancipation of the working classes must be conquered by the working classes themselves.’ And they add immediately afterwards that the struggle for working-class emancipation ‘means not a struggle for class privileges and monopolies, but for equal rights and duties’.135
Many of the political parties and regimes that developed in Marx’s name used the concept of the ‘dictatorship of the proletariat’136 in an instrumental manner, distorting his thought and moving away from the direction he had indicated. But this does not mean we are doomed to repeat the error.

 

Translated by Patrick Camiller

 

Notes:
1 K. Marx and F. Engels, Manifesto of the Communist Party, MECW, vol. 6, p. 514.
2 This term had been used by others before Marx and Engels. See, for example, J.-A. Blanqui, History of Political Economy in Europe (New York: G. P. Putnam and Sons, 1885), pp. 520–33. M. L. Reybaud, Études sur les Réformateurs contemporains ou socialistes modernes: Saint-Simon, Charles Fourier, Robert Owen (Paris: Guillaumin, 1840), pp. 322–41, was the !rst to group these three authors under the category of
modern socialism. Reybaud’s text circulated widely and helped to spread the idea
that they were ‘the entire sum of the eccentric thinkers whose birth our age has
witnessed’, p. vi.
3 Marx and Engels, Manifesto of the Communist Party, p. 515.
4 Ibid.
5 Ibid, pp. 507–13.
6 Ibid, p. 510.
7 V. Geoghegan, Utopianism and Marxism (Berne: Peter Lang, 2008), pp. 23–38, where it is shown that the ‘utopian socialists saw themselves as social scientists’, p. 23. The Marxist- Leninist orthodoxy, for its part, employed the epithet ‘utopian’ in a purely derogatory sense. Cf. the interesting criticism, partly directed at Marx himself, in G. Claeys, ‘Early Socialism in Intellectual History’, History of European Ideas 40 (7): (2014), which !nds in
the de!nitions of ‘science’ and ‘scienti!c socialism’ an example of ‘epistemological authoritarianism’, p. 896.
8 See E. Hobsbawm, ‘Marx, Engels and Pre-Marxian Socialism’, in: E. Hobsbawm (ed.), The History of Marxism. Volume One: Marxism in Marx’s Day (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1982), pp. 1–28.
9 K. Marx and F. Engels, The German Ideology, MECW, vol. 5, pp. 493–510. Engels, who held Saint-Simon in high regard, in Socialism: Utopian and Scienti!c went so far as to assert that ‘almost all the ideas of later Socialists that are not strictly economic are found in him in embryo’, MECW, vol. 25, p. 292.
10 K. Marx, Capital, volume I (London: Penguin, 1976), p. 403.
11 K. Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. Second Instalment’, MECW, vol. 29, p. 97.
12 K. Marx, Value, Price and Pro!t, MECW, vol. 20, p. 110.
13 Marx and Engels, Manifesto of the Communist Party, p. 516.
14 See D. Webb, Marx, Marxism and Utopia (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2000), p. 30.
15 K. Marx, ‘Conspectus on Bakunin’s Statism and Anarchy’, MECW, vol. 24, p. 520.
16 S. Maréchal, ‘Manifesto of the Equals or Equalitarians’, in: P. Buonarroti (ed.), Buonarroti’s History of Babeuf’s Conspiracy for Equality (London: H. Hetherington, 1836), p. 316.
17 F.-N. Babeuf, ‘Gracchus Babeuf à Charles Germain’, in: C. Mazauric (ed.), Babeuf Textes Choisis (Paris: Éditions Sociales, 1965), p. 192.
18 É. Cabet, Travels in Icaria (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2003), p. 81.
19 Ibid, p. 4.
20 Ibid, p. 54.
21 Ibid, p. 49.
22 T. Dézamy, ‘Laws of the Community’, in: P. E. Cocoran (ed.), Before Marx: Socialism and Communism in France, 1830–48 (London: The MacMillan Press Ltd, 1983), pp. 188–96.
23 W. Weitling, Die Menschheit, wie sie ist und wie sie sein sollte (Bern: Jenni, 1845), p. 50.
24 C. H. Saint-Simon, ‘L’Organisateur: prospectus de l’auteur’, in: C. H. de Saint-Simon, OEuvres complètes, vol. III (Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 2012), p. 2115.
25 C. H. Saint-Simon, ‘Le nouveau christianisme’, in: C. H. de Saint-Simon, OEuvres complètes, vol. IV (Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 2012), p. 3222.
26 Ibid, p. 3216.
27 C. Fourier, The Theory of the Four Movements (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996), p. 4.
28 Ibid, pp. 13–14.
29 This is the exact opposite of the theory developed by Sigmund Freud, who, in ‘Civilization and Its Discontents’, in: S. Freud (ed.), Complete Psychological Works, vol.21 (London: Hogarth Press, 1964), pp. 59–148, argued that a non-repressive organization of society would involve a dangerous regression from the level of civilization attained within human relations.
30 C. Fourier, Le nouveau monde industriel et sociétaire, in C. Fourier, OEuvres complètes, vol. VI (Paris: Éditions Anthropos, 1845), p. 15.
31 Ibid, pp. 67–69.
32 R. Owen, The Book of the New Moral World (New York: G. Vale, 1845), p. 185.
33 É. Cabet, Colonie icarienne aux États-Unis d’Amérique: sa constitution, ses lois, sa situation matérielle et morale après le premier semestre 1855 (New York: Burt Franklin, 1971), p. 43.
34 According to R. Rosdolsky in The Making of Marx’s ‘Capital’ (London: Pluto Press, 1977), the Romantic socialists, unlike Marx, ‘were totally incapable of grasping the “course of modern history”, i.e., the necessity and historical progressiveness of the bourgeois social order which they criticized, and con!n[ed] themselves to moralistic rejection of it instead’, p. 422.
35 K. Marx, Capital, volume I (London: Penguin, 1976), p. 92.
36 Ibid, p. 99. Marx made this point in reply to a review of his work in Positive Philosophy (La Philosophie Positive), in which the Comtean sociologist Eugène de Roberty (1843–1915) had criticized him for not having indicated the ‘necessary conditions for a healthy production and just distribution of wealth’, see K. Marx, Das Kapital. Kritik der politischen Ökonomie. Erster Band, Hamburg 1872, MEGA!, vol. II/6, pp. 1622–3. A partial translation of de Roberty’s review is contained in S. Moore, Marx on the Choice between Socialism and Communism (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1980), pp. 84–7, although
Moore wrongly claimed that the purpose of Capital was ‘to !nd in the present the basis for predicting the future’, p. 86.
37 K. Marx, ‘Marx’s Notes (1879–80) on Wagner’, in T. Carver (ed.), Texts on Method (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1975), pp. 182–3.
38 K. Marx, The Civil War in France, MECW, vol. 22, p. 335.
39 K. Marx to F. Domela Nieuwenhuis, 22 February 1881, MECW, vol. 46, p. 66. The vast correspondence with Engels is the best evidence of his consistency in this regard. In the course of forty years of collaboration, the two friends exchanged views on every imaginable topic, but Marx did not spend the least time discussing how the society of the future should be organized.
40 Rosdolsky argued in The Making of Marx’s ‘Capital’ that, while it is true that Marx rejected the idea of the ‘construction of completed socialist systems’, this does not mean that Marx and Engels developed ‘no conception of the socialist economic and social order (a view often attributed to them by opportunists), or that they simply left the entire matter to [their] grandchildren . . . On the contrary, such conceptions played a part in Marx’s theoretical system . . . We therefore constantly encounter discussions and remarks in Capital, and the works preparatory to it, which are concerned with the problems of a socialist society’, pp. 413–14.
41 C.H. Saint-Simon and B.-P. Enfantin, ‘Religion Saint-Simonienne: Procès’, in:C. deSaint Simon and B.-P. Enfantin,Oeuvres de Saint-Simon&D’Enfantin, vol.XLVII (Paris: Leroux, 1878), p. 378. In other parts of theirwork, the two French proto-socialists use the expression ‘the poorest and most laborious class’. See, for example, idem, ‘Notre politique est religieuse’, ibid, vol. XLV, p. 28.
42 An example of this genre is the anthology K. Marx, F. Engels, and V. Lenin, On Communist Society (Moscow: Progress, 1974), which presents the texts of the three authors as if they constituted a homogenous opus of the Holy Trinity of communism. As in many other collections of this type, Marx’s presence is altogether marginal: even if his name appears on the cover, as the supreme guarantor of the faith of ‘scienti!c socialism’, the actual extracts from his writings (19 pages out of 157) are considerably shorter than those of Engels and Lenin (1870–1924). All we !nd here of Marx the theorist of communist society comes from the Manifesto of the Communist Party and the Critique of the Gotha Programme, plus a mere half-page from The Holy Family and a few lines on the dictatorship of the proletariat from the letter of 5 March 1852 to Joseph Weydemeyer (1818–1866). The picture is the same in the diffuse anthology edited by the Finnish communist O. W. Kuusinen, Fundamentals of Marxism-Leninism: Manual, second rev. (Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House, 1963). In part 5, on ‘Socialism and Communism’, Marx is quoted only eleven times, compared with twelve references to the
work ofNikita Khrushchev (1894–1971) and the documents of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union and !fty quotations from the works of Lenin.
43 See R. Aron, Marxismes imaginaires. D’une sainte famille à l’autre (Paris: Gallimard, 1970) which pokes fun at the ‘Parisian para-Marxists’, p. 210, who ‘subordinated Capital to the early writings, especially the economic-philosophical manuscripts of 1844, the obscurity, incompleteness and contradictions of which fascinated the reader’, p. 177. In his view, these authors failed to understand that ‘if Marx had not had the ambition and hope to ground the advent of communism with scienti!c rigour, he would not have needed to work for thirty years on Capital (without managing to complete it). A few pages and a few weeks would have suf!ced’, p. 210. See also, M. Musto, ‘The Myth of the “Young Marx” in the Interpretations of the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844’, Critique, 43 (2) (2015), pp. 233–60. For a description of the fragmentary character of the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 and the incompleteness of the theses contained in them, see M. Musto, Another Marx: Early Manuscripts to the International (London:Bloomsbury, 2018), pp. 42–45.
44 K. Marx, Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, MECW, vol. 3, p. 294. D. Bensaid, ‘Politiques de Marx’, in: K. Marx and F. Engels (eds), Inventer l’inconnu, textes et correspondances autour de la Commune (Paris: La Fabrique, 2008) af!rmed that in its initial phase ‘Marx’s communism is philosophical’, p. 42.
45 Marx, Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, p. 296.
46 Ibid, p. 297.
47 On the complex character of these manuscripts and details of their composition and paternity, see the recent edition K. Marx and F. Engels, Manuskripte und Drucke zur Deutschen Ideologie (1845–1847), MEGA!, vol. I/5. Some seventeen manuscripts are printed there in their fragmentary form as abandoned by the authors, without the semblance of a completed book. For a critical review, prior to publication of MEGA!, vol. I/5, of this much-awaited edition – and in favour of the greatest !delity to the originals – see T. Carver and D. Blank, A Political History of the Editions of Marx and Engels’s ‘German Ideology Manuscripts’ (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), p. 142.
48 Marx and Engels, The German Ideology, p. 47. The words written by Marx are indicated in italic.
49 See Fourier, Le nouveau monde industriel et sociétaire.
50 The only words that belong to Marx – ‘criticize after dinner’, ‘critical critics’, and ‘orcritic’ – actually express his disagreement with the romantic, utopian-inclined views of Engels. We owe the rediscovery and accessible presentation of this important detail to the rigorous philological labours of Wataru Hiromatsu (1933–1994), the editor of the twovolume work with German and Japanese apparatus criticus: W. Hiromatsu (ed.), Die deutsche Ideologie (Tokyo: Kawade Shobo-Shinsha, 1974). Two decades later, T. Carver wrote that this study made it possible to know ‘which words were written in Engels’ hand, which in Marx’s, which insertion can be assigned to each author, and which deletions’, The PostmodernMarx (Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1998) p. 104. Cf. the more recent Carver and Blank, A Political History of the Editions of Marx and Engels’s ‘German IdeologyManuscripts’, pp. 139–40.Marx was referring sarcastically to the positions of other Young Hegelians he had derided and sharply combatted in a book published a few months earlier, The Holy Family, or Critique of Critical Criticism: Against Bruno Bauer and Company. According to Carver, The Postmodern Marx, ‘the famous passage on communist society from The German Ideology cannot now be read as one continuous train of thought agreed jointly between two authors’. In the few words he contributed, Marx was ‘sharply rebuking Engels for straying, perhaps momentarily, from the serious work of undercutting the phantasies of Utopian socialists’, ibid, p. 106. Still, Marx’s marginal insertions were integrated seamlessly into Engels’s initial text by early twentieth-century editors, thereby becoming the canonical description of how human beings would live in communist society ‘according to Marx’.
51 Marx and Engels, The German Ideology, pp. 38, 49.
52 Ibid, p. 52.
53 Ibid, p. 81.
54 Ibid, p. 49.
55 Ibid, p. 52.
56 Marx and Engels, Manifesto of the Communist Party, p. 498.
57 Ibid, p. 500.
58 Ibid, p. 498.
59 Ibid, p. 505. The English translation that Samuel Moore (1838–1911) produced in 1888 in cooperation with Engels, and which is the basis for theMECWedition, renders the German Staatsausgaben [state expenditure] as the less statist, more generic ‘spending for public purposes’.
60 In the International Working Men’s Association, this provision was supported by M. Bakunin (1814–1876) and opposed by Marx. See ‘Part 6: On Inheritance’, in: M. Musto (ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (New York: Bloomsbury, 2014), pp. 159–68.
61 Their ‘practical application’ – as the preface to the German edition of 1872 reminded readers – ‘will depend . . . everywhere and at all times on the obtaining historical conditions, and, for that reason, no special stress is laid on the revolutionary measures proposed at the end of Section II’. By the early 1870s, the Manifesto of the Communist Party had become a ‘historical document’, which its authors felt they no longer had ‘any right to alter’, in Marx and Engels, Manifesto of the Communist Party, p. 175.
62 Marx, Capital, volume I, p. 169.
63 Ibid, p. 172.
64 Ibid, p. 175.
65 Ibid, p. 376.
66 K. Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. First Instalment’, MECW, vol. 28., p. 157.
67 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. Second Instalment’, p. 94.
68 Ibid.
69 Marx, Capital, volume I, p. 171, translation modi!ed.
70 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. First Instalment’,p. 96.
71 K. Marx, Ökonomische Manuskripte 1863–1867, MEGA2, vol. II/4.2, p. 662. Cf. P. Chattopadhyay, Marx’s Associated Mode of Production (New York: Palgrave, 2016),esp. pp. 59–65 and 157–61.
72 K. Marx, Critique of the Gotha Programme, MECW, vol. 24, p. 85.
73 Marx, Capital, volume I, p. 739.
74 Marx, The Civil War in France, p. 339.
75 Ibid, p. 332.
76 Marx, ‘Conspectus of Bakunin’s Statism and Anarchy’, vol. 24, p. 519.
77 On these questions, see E. M. Wood, Democracy against Capitalism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995), esp. pp. 1–48.
78 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. First Instalment’, p. 386.
79 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. Second Instalment’, p. 38.
80 K. Marx, Economic Manuscript of 1861–1863, MECW, vol. 30, p. 196.
81 Marx, Capital, volume I, p. 667.
82 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. First Instalment’,p. 96.
83 Ibid, p. 108.
84 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. Second Instalment’,p. 84.
85 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. First Instalment’,p. 109.
86 Ibid, p. 505.
87 Ibid, pp. 506–07.
88 Ibid, pp. 95–96.
89 Ibid, p. 108.
90 Marx, Critique of the Gotha Programme, p. 85.
91 Ibid, p. 87.
92 Marx, Capital, volume I, p. 621.
93 An extensive new literature has sprung up in the past twenty years on this aspect of Marx’s thought. One of the most recent contributions is K. Saito, Karl Marx’s Ecosocialism: Capital, Nature, and the Un!nished Critique of Political Economy (New York: Monthly Review Press, 2017), esp. pp. 217–55.
94 Marx, Capital, volume I, p. 638.
95 Ibid, p. 447.
96 K. Marx, Capital, volume II (London: Penguin, 1978), p. 390.
97 K. Marx, Capital, volume III (London: Penguin, 1981), p. 799.
98 Ibid, p. 186. See B. Ollman (ed.), Market Socialism: The Debate among Socialists(London: Routledge, 1998).
99 Marx, ‘Marx’s Notes on Wagner’, p. 188.
100 Marx, Capital, volume I, p. 667.
101 Ibid, p. 562.
102 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. First Instalment’, p. 235.
103 Ibid, p. 195. According to P. Mattick, Marx and Keynes (Boston: Extending Horizons Books, 1969) p. 363: ‘For Marx, the law of value “regulates” market capitalism but no other form of social production.’ Therefore, he held that ‘socialism was, !rst of all, the end of value production and thus also the end of the capitalist relations of production’, p. 362.
104 Marx, Value, Price and Pro!t, p. 149.
105 Marx, Critique of the Gotha Programme, p. 88.
106 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. Second Instalment’,p. 88.
107 K. Marx, ‘Report of the General Council on the Right of Inheritance’, MECW, vol.21, p. 65.
108 K. Marx, ‘Preamble to the Programme of the French Workers’ Party’, MECW, vol. 24,p. 340.
109 Marx, Capital, volume III, p. 911.
110 Marx, Capital, volume I, p. 437.
111 Ibid, p. 438.
112 Ibid, p. 346.
113 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. Second Instalment’,p. 93.
114 Marx, Economic Manuscript of 1861–1863, pp. 192, 191.
115 K. Marx, ‘Instructions for the Delegates of the Provisional General Council. The Different Questions’, MECW, vol. 20, p. 187.
116 Marx, Capital, volume I, p. 375.
117 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. Second Instalment’, p. 91.
118 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. First Instalment’, p. 109.
119 Marx, Economic Manuscript of 1861–1863, p. 390.
120 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. Second Instalment’, p. 92.
121 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. First Instalment’, p. 411.
122 Marx, The Civil War in France, pp. 334–5.
123 K. Marx and F. Engels, ‘Fictitious Splits in the International’, MECW, vol. 23, p. 121.
124 Marx, ‘Conspectus on Bakunin’s Book Statehood and Anarchy’, p. 519.
125 Marx, The Civil War in France, p. 329.
126 Ibid, pp. 332–3.
127 Marx, Critique of the Gotha Programme, p. 94.
128 Ibid, p. 85.
129 Marx, The Civil War in France, p. 332.
130 Marx, Critique of the Gotha Programme, p. 87.
131 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. First Instalment’, p. 180.
132 Marx, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. Second Instalment’, p. 40.
133 Ibid.
134 ‘K. Marx to J. B. von Schweitzer, 13 October 1868’, MECW, vol. 43, p. 134.
135 K. Marx, ‘Provisional Rules of the Association’, MECW, vol. 20, p. 14.
136 H. Draper has shown that Marx used the term only seven times, mostly in a radically different sense from the one falsely attributed to him by many of his interpreters or by those who have claimed to be continuing the tradition of his thought. See Karl Marx’s Theory of Revolution. Volume 3: The Dictatorship of the Proletariat (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1986), pp. 385–6.

References:
Aron, Raymond, 1970, Marxismes imaginaires. D’une sainte famille à l’autre, Paris: Gallimard.
Babeuf, François-Noël, 1965, ‘Briser les chaînes’, C. Mazauric (ed.), Babeuf Textes Choisis, Paris : Éditions Sociales, pp. 187-240.
Bensaid, Daniel, 2008, ‘Politiques de Marx’, in Karl Marx et Friedrich Engels, Inventer l’inconnu, textes et correspondances autour de la Commune, Paris : La Fabrique, pp. 11-103.
Blanqui, Jérôme-Adolphe, 1885, History of Political Economy in Europe, New York; London: G.P. Putnam and Sons.
Cabet, Étienne, 1971, Colonie icarienne aux États-Unis d’Amérique: sa constitution, ses lois, sa situation matérielle et morale après le premier semestre 1855, New York: Burt Franklin.
————, 2003, Travels in Icaria, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press.
Carver, Terrell, 1998, The Postmodern Marx, Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State University Press.
Carver, Terrell and Blank, Daniel, 2014, A Political History of the Editions of Marx and Engels’s ‘German Ideology Manuscripts’, New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Chattopadhyay, Paresh, 2016, Marx’s Associated Mode of Production, New York: Palgrave.
Claeys, Gregory, 2014, ‘Early Socialism in Intellectual History’, History of European Ideas 40 (7): 893-904.
Dézamy, Théodore, 1983, ‘Laws of the Community’, Paul E. Cocoran (ed.) Before Marx: Socialism and Communism in France, 1830-48, London: The MacMillan Presss Ltd, pp. 188-196.
Draper, Hal, 1986, Karl Marx’s Theory of Revolution. Volume 3: The Dictatorship of the Proletariat, New York: Monthly Review Press.
Friedrich Engels, 1987, Socialism: Utopian and Scientific, MECW, vol. 25, pp. 244-312.
Fourier, Charles, 1845, ‘Le nouveau monde industriel et sociétaire’, C. Fourier, Œuvres complètes de Ch. Fourier, vol. VI, Paris: Éditions Anthropos.
————, 1996, The Theory of the Four Movements, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Freud, Sigmund, 1964, Civilization and Its Discontents, S. Freud, Complete Psychological Works, vol. 21, London: Hogarth Press.
Geoghegan, Vincent, 2008, Utopianism and Marxism, Berne: Peter Lang.
Hiromatsu, Wataru (ed.), 1974, Die deutsche Ideologie, Tokyo: Kawade Shobo-Shinsha.
Hobsbawm, Eric, 1982, ‘Marx, Engels and Pre-Marxian Socialism’, in Eric Hobsbawm (ed.), The History of Marxism. Volume One: Marxism in Marx’s Day (Bloomington: Indiana University Press), pp. 1-28.
[Otto Wille Kuusinen, ed.], Fundamentals of Marxism-Leninism: Manual (Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House, 1963 – 2nd rev. ed.).
Mattick, Paul, 1969, Marx and Keynes, Boston: Extending Horizons Books.
S. Maréchal, ‘Manifesto of the Equals or Equalitarians’, Philippe Buonarroti, Buonarroti’s History of Babeuf’s Conspiracy for Equality (London: H. Hetherington, 1836), pp. 314-317.
Marx, Karl, 1975, ‘Marx’s Notes (1879-80) on Wagner’, in Terrell Carver (ed.), Texts on Method, Oxford: Basil Blackwell, pp. 179-219.
————, 1976, Capital, Volume I, London : Penguin.
————, 1978, Capital, Volume II, London: Penguin.
————, 1981, Capital, Volume III, London: Penguin.
————, 1975, Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844, MECW, vol. 3, pp. 229-348.
————, 1984, Value, Price and Profit, MECW, vol. 20, pp. 101-149.
————, 1986, The Civil War in France, MECW, vol. 22, pp. 307-359.
————, 2010, Critique of the Gotha Programme, MECW, vol. 24, pp. 75-99.
————, 2010, ‘Conspectus on Bakunin’s Statism and Anarchy’, MECW, vol. 24, pp. 485-526.
————, 1987, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. First Instalment’, MECW, vol. 28.
————, 1986, ‘Outlines of the Critique of Political Economy [Grundrisse]. Second Instalment’, MECW, vol. 29.
————, 1987, Das Kapital. Kritik der politischen Ökonomie. Erster Band, Hamburg 1872, MEGA², vol. II/6.
————, 1988, Economic Manuscript of 1861-1863, MECW, vol. 30.
————, 1988, Letters 1868–70, MECW, vol. 43.
————, 1993, Letters 1880–83, MECW, vol. 46.
————, 2012, Ökonomische Manuskripte 1863-1867, MEGA2, vol. II/4.2.
Marx, Karl and Engels, Friedrich, 1976, The German Ideology, MECW, vol. 5, pp. 19-539.
————, 1976, Manifesto of the Communist Party, MECW, vol. 6, pp. 477-517.
————, 2018, Manuskripte und Drucke zur Deutschen Ideologie (1845-1847), MEGA², vol. I/5.
Marx, Karl, Friedrich Engels and Vladimir Lenin, 1974, On Communist Society, Moscow: Progress.
Mattick, Paul, 1969, Marx and Keynes, Boston: Extending Horizons Books.
Moore, Stanley, 1980, Marx on the Choice between Socialism and Communism, Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.
Musto, Marcello (ed.), 2014, Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later, New York: Bloomsbury.
————, 2015, ‘The Myth of the ‘Young Marx’ in the Interpretations of the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844’, Critique, vol. 43 (2): 233-260.
————, 2018, Another Marx: Early Manuscripts to the International, London: Bloomsbury.
Ollman, Bertell (ed.), 1998, Market Socialism: The Debate among Socialists, London: Routledge.
Owen, Robert, 1845, The Book of the New Moral World, New York: G. Vale.
Reybaud, M. Louis, 1840, Études sur les Réformateurs contemporains ou socialistes modernes: Saint-Simon, Charles Fourier, Robert Owen, Paris: Guillaumin.
Rosdolsky, Roman, 1977, The Making of Marx’s ‘Capital’, London: Pluto Press.
Saint-Simon, Claude Henri, 2012, ‘L’organisateur: prospectus de l’auteur’, Œuvres complètes, vol. III, Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, pp. 2115-2116.
Saint-Simon, Claude Henri de, 2012, Le Nouveau christianisme, C. H. Saint-Simon, Œuvres complètes, vol. IV, Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, pp. 3167-3226.
Saint Simon, Claude Henri de and Enfantin, Barthélémy-Prosper, 1878, ‘Religion Saint-Simonienne: Procès’, C. H. Saint-Simon and B.-P. Enfantin, Oeuvres de Saint-Simon & D’Enfantin, vol. XLVII, Paris: Leroux.
Saito, Kohei, 2017, Karl Marx’s Ecosocialism: Capital, Nature, and the Unfinished Critique of Political Economy, New York: Monthly Review Press.
Webb, Darren, 2000, Marx, Marxism and Utopia, Aldershot: Ashgate.
Weitling, Wilhelm, 1845, Die Menschheit, wie sie ist und wie sie sein sollte, Bern: Jenni.
Wood, Ellen Meiksins, 1995, Democracy against Capitalism, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Categories
Book chapter

Marx y la función dialéctica del capitalismo

La importancia del desarrollo del capitalismo
La convicción de que la expansión del modo de producción capitalista era un prerrequisito básico para el advenimiento de la sociedad comunista está presente a lo largo de toda la obra de Marx. En una de sus primeras conferencias públicas, que dio en la Asociación de Trabajadores Alemanes de Bruselas y que incluyó en un manuscrito preparatorio titulado «Salario» (1847), Marx hablaba de «un aspecto positivo del capital, de la industria a gran escala, de la libre competencia, del mercado mundial». A los trabajadores que habían ido a escucharlo, les dijo:
No necesito explicarles en detalle cómo, sin estas relaciones de producción y sin que los medios de producción ⸻los medios materiales para la emancipación del proletariado y la cimentación de una nueva sociedad⸻ hubiesen sido creados, el proletariado tampoco hubiera logrado la unificación ni el desarrollo a través de los cuales es realmente capaz de revolucionar la vieja sociedad y de revolucionarse a sí mismo. (Marx [1847] 2010: 436)

En el Manifiesto del Partido Comunista, argumentó junto con Engels, que los intentos revolucionarios efectuados por la clase trabajadora durante la crisis final de la sociedad feudal habían sido condenados al fracaso, «debido al estado no-desarrollado, del proletariado de aquel entonces, así como a la ausencia de condiciones materiales para su emancipación […] que podían ser producidas únicamente por la inminente llegada de la época burguesa» (Marx and Engels [1848] 2010: 514). Sin embargo, le reconoció a dicho período más de un mérito: no solamente le había «puesto fin a todas las relaciones idílicas feudales y patriarcales» (486); sino que también «a la explotación, velada por ilusiones religiosas y políticas, le había sustituido la explotación desnuda, desvergonzada, directa y brutal» (487). Engels y Marx no dudaron en declarar que «históricamente, la burguesía ha jugado un papel primordialmente revolucionario» (486). Al utilizar los descubrimientos geográficos y el mercado mundial naciente, le había «aportado un carácter cosmopolita a la producción y al consumo en cada país» (488). Es más, en el transcurso de poco menos de un siglo, «la burguesía [había] creado fuerzas productivas más colosales y masivas que todas las generaciones precedentes juntas» (489). Esto fue posible tan pronto como hubo «sometido a todo el país al dominio de las ciudades» y hubiese redimido «a una parte considerable de la población de la idiotez de la vida rural» tan generalizada en la sociedad feudal europea (488) . Y aún más importante, la burguesía había «forjado las armas que le traerían la muerte a sí misma» y los seres humanos que las utilizarían: «la clase trabajadora moderna, los proletarios» (490); estos iban creciendo al mismo ritmo al cual se iba expandiendo la burguesía. Para Marx y Engels, «el avance de la industria cuya promotora involuntaria es la burguesía, reemplaza el aislamiento de los trabajadores, debido a la competencia, por su combinación revolucionaria, debida a la asociación» (496).
Marx desarrolló ideas similares en Las luchas de clase en Francia (1850), argumentando que únicamente el gobierno de la burguesía «arranca las raíces de la sociedad feudal y allana el terreno sobre el cual solo es posible la revolución proletaria» (Marx [1850] 2010: 56). También a comienzos de la década de 1850, cuando comentaba sobre los principales acontecimientos políticos de aquellos tiempos, teorizó adicionalmente sobre la idea de que el capitalismo era un prerrequisito necesario para el nacimiento de un nuevo tipo de sociedad. En uno de los análisis que escribió en estrecha colaboración con Engels para la Neue Rheinische Zeitung, dijo que en China
en ocho años, los bultos de género de algodón de la burguesía inglesa habían conducido al más antiguo e imperturbable reino de la tierra a la víspera de un terremoto social, el cual, en cualquier eventualidad, tendrá ciertamente las consecuencias más significativas para la civilización. (Marx and Engels [1850] 2010: 267)

Tres años después, en «Los resultados futuros del dominio inglés sobre India», afirmó: «Inglaterra tiene que cumplir una misión doble en India: una destructiva, la otra regeneradora ⸻la aniquilación de la vieja sociedad asiática y la construcción de los cimientos materiales de la sociedad occidental en Asia» (Marx [1853] 2010a: 217-218). No se hacía ilusiones en cuanto a los rasgos básicos del capitalismo, ya que estaba muy consciente de que la burguesía nunca había «realizado ningún progreso sin arrastrar individuos y gente por la sangre y el polvo, por la miseria y la degradación» (221). Pero también estaba convencido de que el comercio mundial y el desarrollo de las fuerzas productivas de los seres humanos, mediante la transformación de la producción material en la «dominación científica de los agentes naturales», estaban creando la base para una sociedad diferente: «la industria burguesa y el comercio [podrían] crear estas condiciones materiales de un mundo nuevo» (222) .
Los puntos de vista de Marx acerca de la presencia inglesa en India fueron modificados pocos años después en un artículo para el New-York Tribune acerca de la rebelión de los cipayos, cuando él resueltamente se colocó del lado de aquellos que «intentaban expulsar a los conquistadores extranjeros» (Marx [1857] 2010: 341). Por otra parte, su juicio acerca del capitalismo fue reafirmado, con un filo más político, en el brillante «Discurso en el Aniversario del People’s Paper» (1856). Aquí, al recordar que hubo fuerzas industriales y científicas, sin precedente histórico alguno, que habían surgido al mundo con el capitalismo, él les dijo a los militantes presentes en el evento que «el vapor, la electricidad y la “mula de hilar” (de Crompton) automatizada son revolucionarios de una índole inclusive bastante más peligrosa que los ciudadanos Barbès, Raspail y Blanqui» (Marx [1856] 2010: 655) .
En los Grundrisse, Marx repitió numerosas veces la idea de que ciertas «tendencias civilizadoras» (Marx [1857-1858]1973: 414) de la sociedad se manifestaron con el capitalismo. Mencionó la «tendencia civilizadora del comercio exterior» (256), así como la «tendencia propagandística (civilizadora)» de la «producción de capital», una propiedad «exclusiva» que nunca antes se había manifestado en «condiciones de producción más tempranas» (542). Inclusive fue tan lejos como para citar de manera apreciativa al historiador John Wade (1788-1875), quien, al reflexionar acerca de la creación de tiempo libre generado por la división del trabajo, había sugerido que «capital es tan solo otro nombre que se le da a la civilización» (585) .
Sin embargo, al mismo tiempo Marx atacaba al capitalista por «usurpador» del «tiempo libre creado por los trabajadores para la sociedad» (634). En un pasaje muy cercano a las posiciones expresadas en el Manifiesto del Partido Comunista, en 1853, en las columnas del New-York Tribune, Marx escribió:
[…] la producción fundamentada en el capital crea, por una parte, industriosidad universal […y] por otra parte un sistema de explotación general de las cualidades naturales y humanas, un sistema de utilidad general […]. De este modo el capital crea la sociedad burguesa, así como la apropiación universal de la naturaleza y del vínculo social mismo por parte de los miembros de la sociedad. De allí la gran influencia civilizadora del capital; su producción de una etapa de la sociedad en comparación a la cual todas las etapas anteriores aparecen como desarrollos locales de la humanidad y como idolatría de la naturaleza. Por primera vez la naturaleza se convierte en un puro objeto para la humanidad, en una mera fuente de utilidad; deja de ser reconocida como un poder en sí misma. […] De acuerdo con esta tendencia, el capital impulsa todo hasta llegar más allá de las barreras nacionales y de los prejuicios, al igual que trasciende la adoración de la naturaleza, así como todas las satisfacciones tradicionales, confinadas, complacientes y arraigadas de las necesidades actuales, y las reproducciones de los antiguos modos de vida. Es destructivo con todo lo anterior y lo revoluciona constantemente, derrumbando todas las barreras que se interponen en el desarrollo de las fuerzas de producción, la expansión de las necesidades, el desarrollo multifacético de la producción y la explotación e intercambio de las fuerzas naturales y mentales. (Marx [1857-1858]1973: 409-410)

En la época de los Grundrisse, por consiguiente, la cuestión ecológica áun se hallaba en el trasfondo de las preocupaciones de Marx, subordinada a la cuestión del desarrollo potencial de los individuos .
Uno de los recuentos analíticos más positivos que hace Marx sobre los efectos de la producción capitalista se puede hallar en el volumen I de El capital. Aunque es mucho más consciente que en el pasado del carácter destructivo del capitalismo, su magna obra repite las seis condiciones generadas por el capital ⸻en particular su «centralización»⸻ que son los prerrequisitos fundamentales que establecen el potencial requerido para el nacimiento de la sociedad comunista. Dichas condiciones son: 1) el trabajo cooperativo; 2) la aplicación de la ciencia y la tecnología a la producción; 3) la apropiación de las fuerzas de la naturaleza por parte de la producción; 4) la creación de maquinaria de gran tamaño que tan solo pueda ser operada por los trabajadores de manera colectiva; 5) la economía de los medios de producción; y 6) la tendencia a crear el mercado mundial. Para Marx:
[…] de la mano de […] esta expropiación de numerosos capitalistas por parte de unos pocos, tienen lugar otros desarrollos en una escala cada vez mayor, tales como el crecimiento de la forma cooperativa del proceso de trabajo, la aplicación técnica consciente de la ciencia, la explotación planeada de la tierra, la transformación de los medios de trabajo en formas en las cuales ellos tan solo pueden ser utilizados en común, la economía de todos los medios de producción a través de su uso como medios de producción de trabajo combinado y socializado, el entrecruzamiento de todos los pueblos en la red del mercado mundial, y, con esto, el crecimiento del carácter internacional del régimen capitalista.(Marx [1867-1890]: 750)
Marx sabía muy bien que, con la concentración de la producción en manos de cada vez menos patronos, «la masa de miseria, opresión, esclavitud, degradación y explotación» (750) estaba aumentando para las clases trabajadoras; pero también estaba consciente de que «la cooperación de los trabajadores asalariados es promovida enteramente por el capital que los emplea» (336). Él había llegado a la conclusión de que el extraordinario crecimiento de las fuerzas productivas bajo el capitalismo ⸻un fenómeno mayor que lo ocurrido en cualquiera de los modos de producción anteriores⸻ había creado las condiciones para superar las relaciones socioeconómicas que él mismo había generado, y por ende, para avanzar hacia una sociedad socialista. Al igual que en sus consideraciones acerca del perfil económico de las sociedades no europeas, el punto central del pensamiento de Marx aquí era la progresión del capitalismo hacia su propia deposición. En el volumen III de El capital, escribió que la «usura» tenía un «efecto revolucionario» en la medida en que contribuía a la destrucción y la disolución de
formas de propiedad que brinda[ba]n una base firme para la articulación de la vida política [medieval] y cuya reproducción constante [era] una necesidad para aquella vida». La ruina de los señores feudales y de la pequeña producción significó «centralizar las condiciones del trabajo. (Marx [1894] 2010: 591-592)

En el volumen I de El capital, Marx escribió que «el modo capitalista de producción es una condición históricamente necesaria para la transformación del proceso de trabajo en un proceso social» (Marx [1867-1890]: 340). Tal como lo veía, «el poder socialmente productivo del trabajo se desarrolla como un regalo gratuito al capital, cada vez que los trabajadores son colocados bajo ciertas condiciones, y es el capital el que los coloca bajo dichas condiciones» (338). Marx sostuvo que las circunstancias más favorables para el comunismo tan solo se podían desarrollar con la expansión del capital:
Él [el capitalista] está fanáticamente empeñado en la valorización del valor; por consiguiente, obliga despiadadamente a la raza humana a que produzca por el bien de la producción. De esa manera impulsa el desarrollo de las fuerzas productivas de la sociedad y la creación de aquellas condiciones materiales de la producción que son las únicas que pueden formar la base real de una forma superior de sociedad, una sociedad en la cual el principio de desarrollo libre y completo de cada individuo forma el principio rector. (Marx [1867-1890]: 588)

Subsiguientes reflexiones sobre el papel que cumple el modo de producción capitalista para hacer del comunismo una posibilidad histórica real, aparecen a todo lo largo de la crítica de la economía política de Marx. Por supuesto que él había entendido claramente ⸻tal como lo escribió en los Grundrisse⸻ que, si una de las tendencias del capital consiste en «crear tiempo disponible», subsiguientemente este «lo convierte en plusvalía» (Marx [1857-1858]1973: 708). Aun así, con dicho modo de producción, el trabajo es valorizado al máximo, en tanto que «la cantidad de trabajo necesario para la producción de un determinado objeto es […] reducida a un mínimo». Para Marx ese era un punto fundamental. El cambio que incorporaba «redundaría en beneficio del trabajo emancipado» y era «la condición de su emancipación» (701). De ese modo el capital
a pesar de sí mismo, sirve de instrumento en la creación de posibilidades del tiempo social disponible, con el fin de reducir a un mínimo decreciente el tiempo de trabajo de toda la sociedad y así, liberar tiempo de cada uno para su propio desarrollo. (708)

Marx también anotó que, para formar una sociedad en la cual el desarrollo universal de los individuos fuese lograble, era «necesario por encima de todo que el pleno desarrollo de las fuerzas de producción» se hubiese convertido en «la condición de producción» (542). Por consiguiente, él afirmó que la «gran cualidad histórica» del capital es:
[…] crear este trabajo excedente, trabajo superfluo desde el punto de vista del mero valor de uso, de la mera subsistencia; y su destino histórico [Bestimmung] está cumplido tan pronto como, por un lado, ha habido tal desarrollo de las necesidades que aquél trabajo excedentario arriba mencionado y que está más allá de la necesidad, se haya convertido en una necesidad general que surge de las mismas necesidades individuales ⸻y, por el otro lado, cuando la severa disciplina productiva del capital, actuando sobre generaciones sucesivas [Geschlechter], ha desarrollado una industriosidad general que es la propiedad general de la nueva especie [Geschlecht]⸻ y, finalmente, cuando el desarrollo de los poderes productivos del trabajo, que el capital incesantemente fustiga hacia adelante con su inagotable manía de riqueza y de las únicas condiciones en las cuales dicha manía puede ser realizada, han florecido hasta alcanzar la etapa en la cual la posesión y preservación de la riqueza general requiere un menor tiempo de trabajo de la sociedad como un todo, y en donde la sociedad trabajadora se relaciona científicamente con el proceso de su reproducción progresiva, su reproducción en abundancia constantemente mayor; y por ende en la cual ha cesado el trabajo en el que un ser humano hace lo que una cosa puede hacer. […] Es por esto por lo que el capital es productivo; es decir, una relación esencial para el desarrollo de las fuerzas productivas sociales. Solo deja de serlo cuando el desarrollo de estas fuerzas productivas encuentra un límite en el capital mismo. (325)

Marx reafirmó dichas convicciones en el texto «Resultados del proceso inmediato de producción». Habiendo recapitulado previamente los límites estructurales del capitalismo, ⸻sobre todo, que es un «modo de producción en contradicción e indiferencia para con el productor»⸻ se concentra en su «lado positivo» (Marx [1867] 1976b: 1037). En comparación con el pasado, el capitalismo se presenta a sí mismo como «una forma de producción no sujeta a un nivel de necesidades planteado anticipadamente, y que por consiguiente no predetermina el curso de la producción misma» (1037). Es precisamente el crecimiento de «las fuerzas productivas sociales del trabajo» el que explica «la significancia histórica de la producción capitalista en su forma específica» (1024).
Marx, entonces, en las condiciones socioeconómicas de su tiempo, consideraba fundamental el proceso de creación de «riqueza como tal, es decir, las implacables fuerzas productivas del trabajo social, el único que puede formar la base material de una sociedad humana libre» (990). Lo que era «necesario», era «abolir la forma contradictoria de capitalismo» (1065).
El mismo tema reaparece en el volumen III de El capital, cuando Marx subraya que la elevación de «las condiciones de producción a condiciones generales, comunitarias y sociales […] es traída por el desarrollo de las fuerzas productivas bajo la producción capitalista y por la manera y la forma en la cual aquel desarrollo es logrado» (Marx [1894] 2010: 263).
A la vez que sostenía que el capitalismo era el mejor sistema que hasta entonces había existido, en términos de la capacidad de expandir al máximo las fuerzas productivas, Marx también reconoció que ⸻a pesar de la despiadada explotación de los seres humanos⸻ tenía un número creciente de elementos progresistas que le permitían a las capacidades individuales llegar a una mayor plenitud que en sociedades anteriores.
Profundamente opuesto a la máxima productivista del capitalismo, a la primacía del valor de cambio y al imperativo de la producción de plusvalía, Marx consideró la cuestión de la productividad aumentada en relación con el crecimiento de las capacidades individuales. Fue así como señaló en los Grundrisse:
No solamente cambian las condiciones objetivas en el acto de la reproducción, por ejemplo, la aldea se convierte en ciudad, el bosque en un campo despejado para el cultivo, etc., sino que los productores cambian, también, en cuanto sacan a la luz nuevas cualidades en sí mismos, se desarrollan nuevas capacidades e ideas, nuevos modos de relación, nuevas necesidades y nuevos lenguajes. (Marx [1857-1858] 1973: 494)

Este desarrollo de las fuerzas productivas, mucho más intenso y complejo, generó «el más enriquecedor desarrollo de los individuos» (541) y «la universalidad de las relaciones» (542). Para Marx:
El incesante impulso del capital hacia la forma general de riqueza empuja al trabajo más allá de los límites de su necesidad natural, y crea de ese modo los elementos materiales para el desarrollo de la rica individualidad que es multifacética, tanto en su producción como en su consumo, y cuyo trabajo, por consiguiente, ya no aparece más como trabajo sino como el pleno desarrollo de la actividad misma, en la cual ha desaparecido la necesidad natural en su forma directa; porque una necesidad creada históricamente ha tomado el lugar de la necesidad natural. (325)
En suma, para Marx la producción capitalista ciertamente produjo «la alienación del individuo tanto de sí mismo como de los demás; pero también la universalidad y la extensión comprensiva de sus relaciones y capacidades» (162). Marx enfatizó este punto varias veces.
En los Manuscritos de 1861-1863, anotó que
una mayor diversidad de producción [y] una extensión de la esfera de las necesidades sociales y de los medios de su satisfacción […] también impele el desarrollo de la capacidad productiva humana y, por ende, la activación de las disposiciones humanas en direcciones nuevas. (Marx [1861-1863] 2010a: 199)

En Teorías de la plusvalía (1862-1863), Marx dejó muy en claro que el crecimiento sin precedentes de las fuerzas productivas generado por el capitalismo no solamente tenía efectos económicos, sino que «revolucionaba todas las relaciones políticas y sociales» (Marx [1861-1863] 2010b: 344). Y en el volumen I de El capital, escribió que «el intercambio de mercancías rompe a través de todas las limitaciones individuales y locales del intercambio directo de productos [pero] allí también desarrolla toda una red de conexiones sociales de origen natural [gesellschaftlicher Naturzusammenhänge] que se halla completamente por fuera del control de los agentes humanos» (Marx [1867] 1976a: 207). Es una cuestión de producción que tiene lugar «en una forma adecuada para el pleno desarrollo de la raza humana» (638) (Marx [1867-1890] 2010: 507).
Finalmente, Marx desarrolló una visión positiva de ciertas tendencias del capitalismo relacionadas con la emancipación de las mujeres y la modernización de las relaciones en la esfera doméstica. En el importante documento político «Instructions for the Delegates of the Provisional General Council. The Different Questions» [«Instrucciones para los delegados del Consejo General Provisional. Las diferentes cuestiones»], que redactó para el primer congreso de la Asociación Internacional de Trabajadores [International Working Men’s Association] en 1866, escribió que «aunque bajo el capital esto fue distorsionado hasta convertirlo en una abominación […] el hacer que los niños y las personas jóvenes de ambos sexos cooperasen en el gran trabajo de la producción social [es] una tendencia progresista, sana y legítima» (Marx and Engels [1864-1868] 2010: 188).
Juicios similares pueden hallarse en el volumen I de El capital, donde escribió:
Por terrible y repugnante que aparezca la disolución de los antiguos lazos familiares dentro del sistema capitalista, la industria a gran escala, al asignar una parte importante en los procesos de producción organizados socialmente, por fuera de la esfera de la economía doméstica, a las mujeres, a los jóvenes y niños de ambos sexos, crea no obstante una nueva cimentación económica para una forma superior de la familia y de las relaciones entre los sexos. (Marx [1867] 1976a: 620-621; [1867-1890] 2010: 492)

Marx observó, además, que «el modo de producción capitalista completa la desintegración de la unión familiar primitiva que ataba a la manufactura con la agricultura cuando ambas se encontraban en una etapa subdesarrollada e infantil». Un resultado de ello fue una «preponderancia siempre creciente [de] la población urbana», «el motor histórico de la sociedad» que «la producción capitalista recoge y reúne en grandes centros» (637; 506).
Utilizando el método dialéctico, al cual recurrió con frecuencia en El capital y en sus manuscritos preparatorios, Marx argumentó que «los elementos para formar una nueva sociedad» estaban tomando forma a través de «la maduración [de] las condiciones materiales y la combinación social del proceso de producción» bajo el capitalismo (635; 504-505). Se estaban creando así las premisas materiales para «una nueva síntesis superior» (637; 506). Aunque la revolución nunca surgiría puramente a través de las dinámicas económicas, sino que siempre requeriría también del factor político, el advenimiento del comunismo «requiere que la sociedad posea una cimentación material, o una serie de condiciones materiales de existencia, las cuales a su vez son el producto natural y espontáneo [naturwüchsige Produkt] de un desarrollo histórico prolongado y tormentoso» (173; 90-91).
Tesis similares son presentadas en varios textos políticos cortos pero significativos; contemporáneos con o subsiguientes a la composición de El capital, lo cual confirma la continuidad del pensamiento de Marx. En Valor, precio y ganancia (1865), urgió a los trabajadores a que comprendieran que, «con todas las miserias que [el capitalismo] les impone, el presente sistema simultáneamente engendra las condiciones materiales y las formas sociales necesarias para una reconstrucción económica de la sociedad» (Marx [1865] 2010: 149).
En la «Comunicación confidencial» (1870) enviada en nombre del Consejo General de la Asociación Internacional de Trabajadores del comité de Brunswick del Partido Socialdemócrata de los Trabajadores de Alemania (SDAP), Marx sostuvo que «aunque la iniciativa revolucionaria probablemente venga de Francia, Inglaterra por sí misma puede servir como palanca para una seria revolución económica». Él lo explicó de la siguiente manera:
Es el único país en el cual ya no hay más campesinos y en donde la propiedad rural está concentrada en unas pocas manos. Es el único país en el cual la forma capitalista, ⸻es decir, el trabajo combinado en gran escala bajo amos capitalistas⸻ abarca virtualmente la totalidad de la producción. Es el único país donde la gran mayoría de la población consta de trabajadores asalariados. Es el único país en donde la lucha de clases y la organización de la clase trabajadora por parte de los sindicatos han alcanzado un cierto grado de madurez y universalidad. Es el único país en el cual, debido a su dominio en el mercado mundial, cada revolución en materia económica debe afectar de inmediato la totalidad del mundo. Si bien el latifundismo [landlordism] y el capitalismo son rasgos clásicos de Inglaterra, por otra parte, las condiciones materiales de su destrucción se encuentran más maduras aquí. (Marx [1870] 2010: 86)

En sus «Notas sobre el libro de Bakunin Estado y anarquía» [Statehood and Anarchy] las cuales contienen importantes indicaciones acerca de sus diferencias radicales con el revolucionario ruso en relación con los prerrequisitos para una sociedad alternativa al capitalismo, Marx reafirmó, también respecto del sujeto social que lideraría la lucha por el socialismo que
una revolución social está atada a unas condiciones históricas definidas en materia de desarrollo económico; esas son sus premisas. Tan solo es posible, por consiguiente, allí donde junto con la producción capitalista el proletariado industrial representa cuando menos una masa significativa de la población. (Marx [1874-75] 2010: 518)

En la «Crítica al programa de Gotha» [Critique of the Gotha Programme] (1875), en la cual rechazó aspectos de la plataforma para la unificación de la Asociación General de Trabajadores Alemanes (ADAV) y el Partido Social-Demócrata de los Trabajadores Alemanes, Marx propuso: «En proporción a la manera en que se desarrolle socialmente el trabajo y se convierta en una fuente de riqueza y cultura, la pobreza y la miseria se desarrollan entre los trabajadores, y la riqueza y la cultura entre los no-trabajadores». Y añadió: «Lo que debe hacerse aquí […] es demostrar concretamente de qué manera en la actual sociedad capitalista, las condiciones materiales, etc. han sido creadas finalmente y permiten e impulsan a los obreros a levantar esta maldición histórica» (Marx [1875] 2010: 82-83).
Finalmente, en el «Preámbulo al programa del Partido de los Trabajadores Franceses» (1880) [Preamble to the Programme of the French Workers’ Party], un texto corto que escribió tres años antes de su muerte, Marx enfatizó que una condición esencial para que los obreros estuviesen en capacidad de apropiarse los medios de producción era «la forma colectiva, cuyos elementos materiales e intelectuales están hormados por el desarrollo mismo de la sociedad capitalista» (Marx [1880] 2010: 340) .
Es así como, en una continuidad que va desde sus formulaciones iniciales sobre la concepción materialista de la historia, en la década de 1840, hasta sus últimas intervenciones políticas de la década de 1880, Marx resaltó la relación fundamental entre el crecimiento productivo generado por el modo de producción capitalista y las precondiciones para la sociedad comunista para cuyo advenimiento debe luchar el movimiento de los trabajadores. La investigación que llevó a cabo en los últimos años de su vida, no obstante, le ayudó a revisar su convicción y le permitió evitar la caída en el economicismo que marcó el análisis de tantos de sus seguidores.

Una transición que no siempre es necesaria
Marx consideraba al capitalismo como un «punto de transición necesario» (Marx [1857-1858] 1973: 515) para que se desenvolvieran las condiciones que le permitirían al proletariado luchar con algunas posibilidades de éxito y establecer un modo de producción socialista. En otro pasaje de los Grundrisse, él repitió que el capitalismo era un «punto de transición» (540) hacia el progreso ulterior de la sociedad, el cual permitiría «el más alto desarrollo de las fuerzas de producción» y «el más enriquecedor desarrollo de los individuos» (541). Marx describió «las condiciones de producción contemporáneas» como «suspendiéndose a sí mismas y […] cimentando los presupuestos históricos para un nuevo estado de la sociedad» (461).
Con un énfasis que a veces proclama como un heraldo la idea de la predisposición capitalista a la autodestrucción , Marx declaró que «del mismo modo que el sistema de economía burguesa se ha desarrollado para nosotros solamente por grados, asimismo lo hace su negación, que es el resultado último» (712). Él dijo que estaba convencido de que «la última forma de servidumbre» (¡pero decir «última» era ⸻ciertamente⸻ ir demasiado lejos!)
[…] asumida por la actividad humana, aquella del trabajo asalariado, por un lado, del capital por el otro, es por consiguiente descartada como una piel y el descarte mismo es el resultado de un modo de producción correspondiente al capital; las condiciones materiales y mentales de la negación del trabajo asalariado y del capital, que ya son ⸻ellas mismas⸻ la negación de formas más tempranas de producción social no libre, constituyen en sí los resultados de su proceso de producción. La creciente incompatibilidad entre el desarrollo productivo de la sociedad y sus relaciones de producción existentes hasta el presente se expresa a sí misma en amargas contradicciones, crisis, espasmos. La violenta destrucción de capital, no por relaciones externas a él, sino más bien como una condición de su autopreservación, es la forma más impactante en la cual se le imparte el consejo de que se marche y libere el espacio para dar paso a un estado de producción social más elevado. (749-750)

En Teorías de la plusvalía puede hallarse confirmación adicional de que Marx consideraba al capitalismo como una etapa fundamental para el nacimiento de una economía socialista. En aquella obra expresó su acuerdo con el economista Richard Jones (1790-1855), para quien «el capital y el modo de producción capitalista» debían ser «aceptados» meramente como «una fase transicional en el desarrollo de la producción social». A través del capitalismo, escribe Marx, «se abre el prospecto de una nueva sociedad, hacia la cual el modo de producción burgués es solamente una transición» (Marx [1861-63] 2010b: 346).
Marx elaboró una idea similar en el volumen I de El capital y sus manuscritos preparatorios. En el famoso e inédito «Apéndice: resultado del proceso de producción inmediato», escribió que el capitalismo surgió a la vida siguiendo una «revolución económica completa»:
Por una parte, crea las condiciones reales para la dominación del trabajo por el capital, perfeccionando el proceso y proporcionándole el marco apropiado. Por otra parte, al desarrollar condiciones de producción y comunicación, y fuerzas de trabajo productivas antagonistas de los obreros involucrados en ellas, esta revolución crea las premisas reales de un nuevo modo de producción, uno que conlleva la abolición de la forma contradictoria del capitalismo. Crea, por ende, la base material de un proceso social novedosamente formado y, por consiguiente, de una nueva formación social. (Marx [1867] 1976b: 1065)

En uno de los capítulos finales del volumen I, «Tendencia histórica de la acumulación capitalista», afirmó:
[…] la centralización de los medios de producción y la socialización del trabajo alcanzan un punto en el cual se tornan incompatibles con el tegumento capitalista. Dicho tegumento estalla en pedazos. Resuena el toque de campana de difuntos por la propiedad privada capitalista. Los expropiadores son expropiados. (Marx [1867-1890] 2010: 750)

Aunque Marx sostuvo que el capitalismo era una transición esencial, en la cual se creaban las condiciones históricas para que el movimiento de los obreros luchara para una transformación comunista de la sociedad, él no pensó que esa idea pudiera ser aplicada de una manera rígida y dogmática. Por el contrario, él negó más de una vez ⸻tanto en textos publicados como inéditos⸻ que él hubiese desarrollado una interpretación unidireccional de la historia, en la cual los seres humanos estuviesen por doquier destinados a seguir el mismo sendero y transitar por las mismas etapas.
En los años finales de su vida, Marx repudió la tesis, que equivocadamente se le atribuyó, de que el modo de producción burgués era históricamente inevitable. Su distancia con aquella posición fue expresada cuando se encontró arrastrado al debate sobre las posibilidades del desarrollo capitalista en Rusia. En un artículo titulado «Marx ante el tribunal de Yu. Zhukovsky», el escritor y sociólogo ruso Nikolai Mikhailovsky (1842-1904) lo acusó de considerar también al capitalismo como una etapa inevitable de la emancipación de Rusia (Mikhailovsky 1911). Marx replicó en una carta que le dirigió a la revista político-literaria Otechestvennye Zapiski [Anales de la patria], que en el volumen I de El capital él «no había hecho más que afirmar cuál era el trazado del sendero a través del que había surgido en Europa Occidental el orden económico capitalista del vientre del orden económico feudal» (Marx [1877] 1984: 135) . Marx se refirió a un pasaje en la edición francesa del volumen I de El capital (1872-1875), que sugería que la base de la separación de las masas rurales de sus medios de producción había sido «la expropiación de los productores agrícolas», pero que «solamente en Inglaterra» dicho proceso «había sido hasta entonces llevado a cabo de una manera radical», y que «todos los países de Europa Occidental [estaban] siguiendo el mismo curso» (Marx 1989: 634) . De acuerdo con eso, el objetivo de su examen era tan solo «el Viejo continente» y no el mundo entero.
Este es el horizonte espacial dentro del cual deberíamos entender la famosa afirmación del prefacio de la primera edición alemana de El capital, volumen I: «el país que está más desarrollado industrialmente tan solo le muestra, al menos desarrollado, la imagen de su propio futuro». Escribiendo para lectores alemanes, Marx observó que, «exactamente del mismo modo que el resto de la Europa Occidental continental, no solamente padecemos del desarrollo de la producción capitalista, sino también de lo incompleto que se encuentra dicho desarrollo». Desde su punto de vista, junto con «los males modernos», los alemanes estaban «oprimidos por toda una serie de males heredados, que surgen de la supervivencia pasiva de modos de producción arcaicos y pasados de moda, con su séquito de anacrónicas relaciones sociales y políticas» (Marx [1867-1890] 2010: 9) .
Marx también mostró un enfoque flexible para con otros países europeos, ya que no pensaba que Europa fuese un todo homogéneo. En un discurso que dio el 28 de febrero de 1867 a la Sociedad Educativa de los Trabajadores Alemanes de Londres ⸻el cual más tarde fue publicado en Der Vorbote [El Heraldo] en Ginebra⸻, él argumentó que los proletarios alemanes tan solo podían llevar a cabo exitosamente una revolución porque «a diferencia de los trabajadores de otros países, no necesitan recorrer el prolongado período del desarrollo burgués» (Marx [1867] 2010: 415).
En lo concerniente a Rusia, Marx compartía el punto de vista de Mikhailovsky de que podría «desarrollar sus propios cimientos históricos y, de ese modo, sin tener que experimentar todas las torturas del régimen [capitalista], poder apropiarse de sus frutos» (Marx [1877] 2010: 199). Él acusó a Mikhailovsky de «transformar [su] esbozo histórico de la génesis del capitalismo en Europa Occidental en una teoría histórico-filosófica del curso que fatalmente se impone sobre todos los pueblos, cualesquiera sean las circunstancias en las que se hallen» (200). Marx entonces planteó el punto general según el cual «acontecimientos de asombrosa similitud, que tienen lugar en diferentes contextos históricos, condujeron a resultados completamente dispares» (201). Por consiguiente, para comprender las transformaciones históricas era necesario estudiar por separado los fenómenos individuales; y tan solo después de ello sería posible interpretarlos adecuadamente. Su correcta interpretación nunca podría surgir «con la llave maestra de una teoría histórico-filosófica, cuya suprema virtud consistiera en ser suprahistórica» (201) .
Marx expresó las mismas convicciones en 1881 cuando la revolucionaria Vera Zasúlich (1849-1919) solicitó sus puntos de vista acerca del futuro de la comuna rural [obshchina]. Ella quería saber si podía desarrollarse en una forma socialista, o si estaba condenada a perecer porque el capitalismo también se impondría necesariamente en Rusia. En su respuesta, Marx resaltó que en el volumen I de El capital él había «restringido expresamente […] la inevitabilidad histórica» del desarrollo del capitalismo ⸻que había efectuado «una separación completa del productor de los medios de producción»⸻ a los países de Europa Occidental (Marx [1881] 2010b: 360)
En los borradores preliminares de la carta Marx se adentra en las peculiaridades derivadas de la coexistencia de la comuna rural con formas económicas más avanzadas. Observa que Rusia es
[…] contemporánea con una cultura más adelantada, está vinculada a un mercado mundial dominado por la producción capitalista. Mediante la apropiación de los resultados positivos de su modo de producción se encuentra entonces en una posición que le permite desarrollar y transformar la forma aún arcaica de su comuna rural, en vez de destruirla. (Marx [1881] 2010b: 362)

El campesinado podía «incorporar de ese modo las adquisiciones positivas concebidas por el sistema capitalista sin pasar bajo sus Horcas Caudinas» (Marx [1881] 2010c: 368).
A quienes argumentaban que el capitalismo era una etapa inevitable también para Rusia, partiendo de la base de que era imposible que la historia avanzara a saltos, Marx les preguntó irónicamente si ello significaba que Rusia, «al igual que Occidente», había tenido «que pasar a través de un largo período de incubación en la industria de la ingeniería […] para poder utilizar máquinas, motores de vapor, ferrocarriles, etc.» de manera similar, ¿no había sido posible «introducir en un abrir y cerrar de ojos, la totalidad del mecanismo de cambio (bancos, instituciones de crédito, etc.) que le tomó a Occidente siglos engendrar?» (Marx [1881] 2010a: 349). Era evidente que la historia de Rusia, o de cualquier otro país no tenía que volver a recorrer inevitablemente todas las etapas experimentadas por Inglaterra u otras naciones europeas. Por consiguiente, la transformación socialista de la obshchina también podía tener lugar sin que hubiera de pasar necesariamente por el capitalismo. Estas tesis no contradecían el «Prólogo» de la primera edición del volumen I de El capital, en donde Marx declaró que «inclusive cuando una sociedad ha comenzado a investigar las leyes naturales de su movimiento […] no puede ni brincarse las fases naturales de su desarrollo, ni suprimirlas por decreto. Puede sin embargo acortar y disminuir los dolores del parto» (Marx [1867] 1976a: 92; [1867-1890] 2010: 10).
Durante el mismo período, la investigación teórica de Marx acerca de las relaciones comunitarias precapitalistas, compiladas en sus Cuadernos etnográficos, estaban conduciéndolo en la misma dirección que aquella que resultaba evidente en su respuesta a Vera Zasúlich. Animado por su lectura del trabajo del antropólogo norteamericano Lewis Morgan (1818-1881), Marx escribió en tonos propagandísticos que «Europa y América», las naciones donde el capitalismo estaba más desarrollado, podían «tan solo aspirar a romper [sus] cadenas reemplazando la producción capitalista con producción cooperativa y la propiedad capitalista con una forma más elevada del tipo arcaico de propiedad, es decir, la propiedad comunista» (Marx [1881] 2010b: 362) .
El modelo de Marx no era de ningún modo un «tipo primitivo de cooperativa o de producción colectiva» que resultase de «el individuo aislado», sino uno que derivaba de la «socialización de los medios de producción» (Marx [1881] 2010a: 351). Él no había cambiado su visión (completamente crítica) de las comunas rurales de Rusia y, en su análisis, el desarrollo de la producción individual y social preservó intacta su irremplazable centralidad.
En las reflexiones de Marx sobre Rusia, entonces, no hay ruptura dramática con sus ideas previas . Los nuevos elementos, en comparación con el pasado, incorporan una maduración de su posición teórico-política, la cual lo condujo a considerar otros caminos posibles hacia el comunismo que él anteriormente había tomado por irrealizables .
Marx aceptó que, «hablando de manera teórica», era posible que la obshchina
preservarse mediante el desarrollo de su base, la propiedad comunal de la tierra. Puede convertirse en un punto de partida directo hacia el sistema económico al cual tiende la sociedad moderna; puede pasar a una nueva hoja sin comenzar por cometer suicidio; puede ganar la posesión de los frutos con los cuales la producción capitalista ha enriquecido a la humanidad, sin pasar a través del régimen capitalista. (Marx [1881] 2010a: 354)

La existencia contemporánea de la producción capitalista le ofreció a la comuna rural «las condiciones materiales para tener el trabajo cooperativo organizado en una vasta escala» (Marx [1881] 2010c: 368).
La idea de que el desarrollo del socialismo pudiera ser posible en Rusia no tenía como único fundamento el estudio efectuado por Marx sobre la situación económica en aquel país. El contacto con los Populistas Rusos, al igual que su relación con los Communards de París una década antes, le ayudó a tornarse cada vez más abierto a la posibilidad de que la historia fuese testigo no solamente de una sucesión de modos de producción, sino también de la irrupción de acontecimientos revolucionarios y de las intersubjetividades que los producen. Se sintió llamado a poner aún más atención a las especificidades históricas y al desarrollo desigual de las condiciones políticas y económicas que existían entre diferentes países y contextos sociales.
Más allá de su indisposición a aceptar que un desarrollo histórico predefinido pudiese aparecer de la misma manera en diferentes contextos económicos y políticos, los avances teóricos de Marx se debían a la evolución de su pensamiento acerca de los efectos del capitalismo en países económicamente atrasados. Él ya no sostenía, como lo había hecho en un artículo de 1853 sobre la India escrito para la New-York Tribune que «la industria y el comercio burgueses crean [las] condiciones de un nuevo mundo» (Marx [1853] 2010b: 222). Años de estudio detallado y observación estrecha de los cambios en la política internacional le habían ayudado a desarrollar una visión del colonialismo británico bastante diferente de la que había expresado como periodista a mediados de sus treinta años. Los efectos del capitalismo en los países coloniales lucían ahora muy diferentes a sus ojos. Refiriéndose a las «Indias Orientales» en uno de los borradores de su carta a Zasulich, escribió que «todo el mundo […] se percata de que la supresión de la propiedad comunal allá no fue más que un acto de vandalismo inglés, que empujó al pueblo nativo hacia adelante y no hacia atrás» (Marx [1881] 2010c: 365) . Desde su punto de vista, «todo cuanto ellos [los británicos] lograron hacer fue arruinar la agricultura nativa y duplicar el número y la severidad de las hambrunas» (368) . El capitalismo no traía consigo el progreso y la emancipación, como se ufanaban sus apologistas, sino el saqueo de los recursos naturales, la devastación ambiental y nuevas formas de servidumbre y de dependencia humana.
Marx retornó en 1882 a la posibilidad de una concomitancia entre el capitalismo y formas de comunidad del pasado. En enero, en el prefacio a la nueva edición rusa del Manifiesto del Partido Comunista, que escribió juntamente con Engels, el destino de la comuna rural rusa está vinculado al de las luchas proletarias en Europa Occidental:
[…] en Rusia encontramos, cara a cara con el fraude capitalista, que se desarrolla rápidamente, y la propiedad burguesa de la tierra que apenas comienza a desarrollarse, que más de la mitad de la tierra es poseída en comunidad por los campesinos. La cuestión ahora es: ¿puede la obshchina rusa, una forma primigenia de propiedad comunal de la tierra, aunque esté sobremanera erosionada, pasar directamente a la forma más elevada de propiedad comunal comunista? ¿O debe, por el contrario, pasar primero por el mismo proceso de disolución que constituye el desarrollo histórico de Occidente? La única respuesta posible en la actualidad es: sí, si la revolución rusa se convierte en la señal de una revolución proletaria en Occidente, de manera que las dos se complementen mutuamente, la presente propiedad comunal rusa de la tierra puede servir como el punto de partida para el desarrollo comunista. (Marx and Engels [1882] 2010: 426)

En 1853 Marx ya había analizado los efectos producidos por la presencia económica de los ingleses en China en el artículo «Revolución en China y en Europa», escrito para la New-York Tribune. Marx pensó que era posible que la revolución en aquel país pudiera conducir a la «explosión de la largamente preparada crisis general, la cual, extendiéndose en el exterior, será prontamente seguida por revoluciones políticas en el Continente». Añadió que aquel sería un «curioso espectáculo, de China enviando desorden al mundo occidental en tanto que los poderes occidentales mediante la intervención de los vapores de guerra ingleses, franceses y norteamericanos están llevando el “orden” a Shanghái, Nanking y a las bocas del Gran Canal» (Marx [1853] 2010a: 98) .
Además, las reflexiones de Marx sobre Rusia no son la única razón para que él pensara que los destinos de los diferentes movimientos revolucionarios, activos en países con disímiles contextos socioeconómicos, pudiesen llegar a estar entrelazados. Entre 1869 y 1870, en varias cartas y en una serie de documentos para la Asociación Internacional de Trabajadores ⸻tal vez con la mayor claridad y concisión en una carta a sus camaradas Sigfrid Meyer (1840-1872) y August Vogt (1817-1895)⸻ él asoció el futuro de Inglaterra («la metrópolis del capital») con el de la más atrasada Irlanda. La primera fue indudablemente «el poder que hasta ahora ha gobernado el mercado mundial» y por consecuencia «por ahora el país más importante para la revolución de los trabajadores»; era «adicionalmente, el único país en donde las condiciones materiales para la revolución se han desarrollado hasta un cierto estado de madurez» (Marx and Engels [1868-70] 2010: 475).
Sin embargo, «luego de haber estudiado la cuestión irlandesa durante años», Marx se había convencido de que «el golpe decisivo contra las clases gobernantes en Inglaterra» ⸻y, engañándose a sí mismo, «decisivo para el movimiento de los trabajadores alrededor del mundo»⸻ «no puede ser dado en Inglaterra, sino solamente en Irlanda». El objetivo más importante seguía siendo «apresurar la revolución social en Inglaterra», pero la «única manera de lograrlo» era «obtener la independencia de Irlanda» (Marx and Engels [1868-70] 2010: 473-476) . En cualquier caso, Marx consideraba a la Inglaterra industrial-capitalista estratégicamente central para la lucha del movimiento de los trabajadores; la revolución en Irlanda, posible tan solo si la «unión forzada entre los dos países» se terminaba, sería una «revolución social» que se manifestaría a sí misma «en formas pasadas de moda» (Marx [1870] 2010: 88). La subversión del poder burgués en naciones en donde las formas modernas de producción tan solo estuvieran aun desarrollándose, no serían suficientes para conllevar la desaparición del capitalismo.
La posición dialéctica a la cual llegó Marx en sus años finales le permitió descartar la idea de que el modo socialista de producción solamente podía ser construido a través de ciertas etapas fijas . La concepción materialista de la historia que él desarrolló está lejos de ser la secuencia mecánica a la cual han reducido numerosas veces su pensamiento. No puede ser asimilada a la idea de que la historia humana es una sucesión progresiva de modos de producción, meras fases preparatorias anteriores a la inevitable conclusión: el nacimiento de una sociedad comunista.
Más aún: él negó explícitamente la necesidad histórica del capitalismo en cada parte del mundo. No existe traza de determinismo económico en su pensamiento. En el famoso «Prólogo» de la Contribución a la crítica de la economía política (1859) él hizo una lista tentativa de la progresión de «los modos de producción asiático, antiguo, feudal y burgués moderno» como el final de la «prehistoria de la sociedad humana» (Marx [1859] 2010: 263-264) y frases similares pueden ser halladas en otros escritos. No obstante, esta idea representa tan solo una pequeña parte de la obra más amplia de Marx sobre la génesis y el desarrollo de diferentes formas de producción. Su método no puede ser reducido al determinismo económico.
Sus consideraciones ricamente argumentadas sobre el futuro de la obshchina son polos opuestos de la idea de equiparar al socialismo con el desarrollo de las fuerzas productivas, un punto de vista que fue sostenido, con tonalidades nacionalistas, en el interior de la Segunda Internacional, en partidos socialdemócratas (en donde inclusive brotaron actitudes simpatizantes con el colonialismo), así como en el movimiento comunista internacional del siglo XX con sus llamados al uso de un supuesto «método científico» de análisis social.
Marx no cambió sus ideas básicas acerca del perfil de la futura sociedad comunista, tal como lo esbozó desde los Grundrisse en adelante, sin jamás perderse complaciéndose en descripciones abstractas. Guiado por la hostilidad hacia los esquematismos del pasado, y hacia los nuevos dogmatismos que se alzaban en su nombre, él pensó que sería posible que la revolución estallara en formas y condiciones que nunca habían sido consideradas.
Para Marx el futuro seguía en las manos de la clase trabajadora, en su capacidad de traer transformaciones sociales a través de sus luchas y organizaciones de masas, y de dar a luz un sistema económico-político alternativo.

 

Bibliografía
Ahmad, A. 1992. In Theory: Classes, Nations, Literatures [En teoría: clases, naciones, literaturas]. London: Verso.
Al-Azm, S. J. 1980. «Orientalism and Orientalism in Reverse» [Orientalismo y orientalismo a la inversa], en: Khamsin, vol. 8, 5-26.
Arico, J. 2014. Marx and Latin America. Boston: Ledien.
Chakrabarty. D. 2000. Provincializing Europe: Postcolonial Thought and Historical Difference [Provincializando a Europa: pensamiento post-colonial y diferencia histórica]. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.
Chatterjee, P. 2004. The Politics of the Governed: Popular Politics in Most of the World [La política de los gobernados: política popular en la mayor parte del mundo]. New York: Columbia University Press.
Dussel. E. 1990. El último Marx (1863-1882) y la liberación latinoamericana. México D. F.: Siglo XXI.
Guha, R. 1997. Dominance without Hegemony: History and Power in Colonial India [Dominación sin hegemonía: historia y poder en la India colonial]. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
Habib, I. 2006. «Marx’s Perception of India», en: I. Husain & P. Patnaik (eds.), Karl Marx on India, 19-54. New Delhi: Tulika.
Hobsbawm, E. 2011. How to Change the World: Reflections on Marx and Marxism [Cómo cambiar el mundo: reflexiones acerca de Marx y del marxismo]. New Haven / London: Yale University Press,
Husain, I. & Patnaik, P. (eds.). 2006. Karl Marx on India. New Delhi: Tulika.
Krader, L. (ed.). 1972. The Ethnological Notebooks of Karl Marx [Los cuadernos etnológicos de Karl Marx]. Assen: Van Gorcum.
Krader, L. 1975. The Asiatic Mode of Production [El modo de producción asiático]. Assen: Van Gorcum.
Lazarus. N. 2002. «The Fetish of “the West” in Postcolonial Theory» [El fetiche de “el Occidente” en la teoría post-colonial]. En C. Bartolovich and N. Lazarus (eds.), Marxism, Modernity and Postcolonial Studies [Marxismo, modernidad y estudios post- coloniales], 43-64 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Marx, K. [1847] 2010. «Wages», en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 6, Marx and Engels 1845-1848, 415-437. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric Book. http://www.koorosh-modaresi.com/MarxEngels/V6.pdf
Marx, K. [1850] 2010. «The Class Struggles in France, 1848 to 1850» [Las luchas de clase en Francia, 1848 a 1850], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 10, Marx and Engels 1849-1851, 45-146. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric Book. http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2010_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1853] 2010a. Revolution in China and in Europe [La revolución en China y en Europa], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 12, Marx and Engels 1853-1854, 93- 100. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric Book.
Marx, K. [1853] 2010b. «The Future Results of British Rule in India» [Los resultados futuros del dominio inglés en India], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 12, Marx and Engels 1853-1854, 217-223. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric Book. http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2012_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1856] 2010. «Speech at the Anniversary of the People’s Paper» [Discurso en el Aniversario del People’s Paper], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 14, Marx and Engels 1855-1856, 655-656. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric. http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2014_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1857] 2010. «Investigation of Tortures in India» [Investigación acerca de las torturas en India], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 15, Marx and Engels 1856-1858, 336-341. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric. http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2015_%20Ka%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1857-1858]1973. Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy, [Fundamentos de la crítica de la economía política]. London: Penguin/New Left Review.
Marx, K. [1859] 2010. A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 29, Marx 1857-61, 257-417. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric Book. http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2029_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1861-63] 2010a. «Economic Manuscript of 1861-1863», en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 30, Marx, 1861-1863. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric. http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2030_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1861-1863] 2010b. Economic Manuscript of 1861-1863, en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 33: Marx, 1861-63. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric. http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2033_%20Ka%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1861-1863] 2010b. «Economic Manuscript of 1861-1863», en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 33, Marx 1861-1863. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric. http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2033_%20Ka%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1865] 2010. «Value, Price and Profit» [Valor, precio y ganancia], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 20, Marx and Engels 1864-1868, 101-149. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
Marx, K. [1867] 2010. «Report of a Speech by Karl Marx at the Anniversary Celebration of the German Workers’ Educational Society in London» [Informe sobre un discurso de Karl Marx en la celebración anual de la Asociación Educativa de los Trabajadores Alemanes de Londres], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 20, Marx and Engels 1864-1868, 415. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric. http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2020_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1867] 1976a. Capital Volume I. Gran Bretaña: Penguin/New Left Review.
https://www.surplusvalue.org.au/Marxism/Capital%20- %20Vol.%201%20Penguin.pdf
Marx, K. [1867] 1976b. «Appendix: Results of the Immediate Process of Production», en:
Capital, vol. 1, 941-1094. Gran Bretaña: Penguin/New Left Review.
Marx, K. [1867-1890] 2010. Capital I, en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 35, Karl Marx, Capital Volume I. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20%26%20Engels%20Collected%20 Works%20Volume%2035_%20K%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1870] 2010. Confidential Communication on Bakunin, en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 21, Marx and Engels 1867-1870, 112-124. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2021_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx%20(1).pdf
Marx, K. [1870] 2010. «The General Council to the Federal Council of romance Switzerland», en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 21, Marx and Engels 1867-1870, 84-91. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2021_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx%20(1).pdf
Marx, K. [1872-1875] 1989. Le Capital, Paris 1872-1875, en: Marx Engels Gesamtausgabe (MEGA2), vol. II/7. Berlin: Dietz.
Marx, K. [1874-75] 2010. «Notes on Bakunin’s Book Statehood and Anarchy» [Notas
sobre el libro de Bakunin Estado y anarquía], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 24, Marx and Engels 1874-1883, 485-526. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2024_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1875] 2010. «Marginal Notes on the Programme of the German Workers’ Party» [Notas al margen al Programa del Partido de los trabajadores alemanes], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 24, Marx and Engels 1874-1883, 81-99. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
Marx, K. [1877] 1984. «A Letter to the Editorial Board of Otechestvennye Zapiski» [Carta al comité editorial de Otechestvennye Zapiski], en: Teodor Shanin (ed.), Late Marx and the Russian Road [El Marx tardío y la vía rusa]. London: Routledge.
Marx, K. [1877] 2010. «A letter to the Editorial Board of Otechestvennye Zapiski» [Carta al comité editorial de Otechestvennye Zapiski], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 24, Marx and Engels 1874-1883, 196-201. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2024_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1880] 2010. «Preamble to the Programme of the French Workers’ Party» [Preámbulo al programa del Partido de los Trabajadores Franceses], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 24, Marx and Engels 1874-1883, 340-342. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
Marx, K. [1881] 2010a. «First Draft of the Letter to Vera Zasulich [Primer borrador de la carta a Vera Zasúlich]», en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 24, Marx and Engels 1874- 1883, 346-360. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric. http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2024_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1881] 2010b. «Second Draft of the Letter to Vera Zasulich» [Segundo borrador de la carta a Vera Zasúlich], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 24, Marx and Engels 1874-1883, 360-364. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2024_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1881] 2010c. «Third Draft of the Letter to Vera Zasulich» [Tercer borrador de la carta a Vera Zasúlich], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 24, Marx and Engels 1874– 1883, 364-369. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2024_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1894] 2010. Capital III, en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 37, Karl Marx, Capital Volume III. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.koorosh-modaresi.com/MarxEngels/V37.pdf
Marx, K. 1963. Œuvres, Économie I. Paris: Gallimard.
Marx, K. und Engels, F. 1988. Exzerpte und Notizen. Juli bis August 1845 [Extractos y notas. De julio a agosto de 1845], en: Marx Engels Gesamtausgabe (MEGA2), vol. IV/4. Berlin: Dietz.
Marx, K. and Engels, F. [1848] 2010. The Manifesto of the Communist Party, en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 6, Marx and Engels 1845-1848, 477-519. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric Book. http://www.koorosh-modaresi.com/MarxEngels/V6.pdfMarx, K. and Engels, F. [1850] 2010. «Review [Análisis], January-February 1850», en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 10, Marx and Engels 1849-1851, 257-270. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric Book. http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2010_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1853] 2010. «Revolution in China and in Europe» [La revolución en China y en Europa], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 12, Marx and Engels 1853-1854, 217- 223. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric Book. http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2012_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. and Engels, F. [1856-59] 2010. Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 40, Letters 1856 -1859. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2040_%20Ka%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. and Engels, F. [1864-68] 2010a. Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 42, Letters 1864- 1868. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2042_%20Ka%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. and Engels, F. [1864-1868] 2010. Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 20, Marx and Engels 1864-1868. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2020_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. [1870] 2010. «The General Council to the Federal Council of romance Switzerland», en Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 21, Marx and Engels 1867-1870, 84-91. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric. http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2021_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx%20(1).pdf
Marx, K. and Engels, F. [1867-1870] 2010. Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 21, Marx and Engels 1867-1870. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2021_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx%20(1).pdf

Marx, K. and Engels, F. [1874-1883] 2010. Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 24, Marx and Engels 1874-1883. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2024_%20M%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. and Engels, F. [1868-1870] 2010. Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 43: Letters 1868- 1870. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.koorosh-modaresi.com/MarxEngels/V43.pdf

Marx, K. and Engels, F. [1874-1879] 2010. Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 45: Letters 1874- 1879. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2045_%20Ka%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. and Engels, F. [1880-1883] 2010. Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 46, Letters 1880-1883. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
http://www.hekmatist.com/Marx%20Engles/Marx%20&%20Engels%20Collected%20W orks%20Volume%2046_%20Ka%20-%20Karl%20Marx.pdf
Marx, K. and Engels, F. [1882] 2010. «Preface to the Second Russian Edition of the Manifesto of the Communist Party» [Prefacio a la segunda edición rusa del Manifiesto del Partido Comunista], en: Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 24, Marx and Engels 1874-1883, 425-426. Gran Bretaña: Lawrence & Wishart Electric.
Mikhailovsky, N. 1911. «Karl Marks pered sudom g. Yu. Zhukovskogo», en: Otechestvennye Zapiski, vol. 1877, n.° 10, 321-356, reimpreso en Polnoe Sobranie Sochinenii (Obras completas), vol. 4, St. Petersburg: M. M. Stasiulevich, 165-206.
Musto, M. 2016. L’ultimo Marx [El último Marx]. Roma: Donzelli.
Poggio, P. P. 1978. Comune contadina e rivoluzione in Russia. L’Obščina [Comuna campesina y revolución en Rusia. L’Obščina]. Milán: Jaca Book.
Sawer, M. 1977. Marxism and the Question of the Asiatic Mode of Production [El marxismo y la cuestión del modo de producción asiático]. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff.
Said, E. 1995. Orientalism. London: Routledge.
Shanin. T. (ed.) 1983. Late Marx and the Russian Road. Marx and ‘the peripheries of capitalism. [El Marx tardío y la vía rusa. Marx y las periferias del capitalismo]. Great Britain: Talasa Ediciones.
Wade, J. 1835. History of the Middle and Working Classes, 3rd. ed. London: E. Wilson.

Categories
Book chapter

La Marx-Engels-Gesamtausgabe (MEGA²) y el redescubrimiento de Marx

Introducción
Sobre mil socialistas, quizás uno solo haya leído una obra económica de Marx, sobre mil antimarxistas, ni siquiera uno ha leído a Marx [i].

Marx y el Marxismo: Inacabado versus Sistematización
Pocos hombres sacudieron el mundo como Karl Marx. A su desaparición, que pasó casi inobservada, le siguió, con una rapidez que en la historia tiene raros ejemplos con los cuales pueda ser confrontada, el eco de la fama. Muy pronto el nombre de Marx estuvo en las bocas de los trabajadores de Chicago y Detroit, así como en las de los primeros socialistas indios en Calcuta. Su imagen sirvió de fondo al congreso de los bolcheviques en Moscú después de la revolución. Su pensamiento inspiró programas y estatutos de todas las organizaciones políticas y sindicales del movimiento obrero, desde Europa entera hasta Shangai.
Sus ideas alteraron profundamente la filosofía, la historia, la economía. Sin embargo, no obstante la afirmación de sus teorías, que en el siglo XX se transformaron en la ideología dominante y la doctrina de Estado en una gran parte del género humano, y la enorme difusión de sus escritos, sigue sin tener, hasta hoy, una edición integral y científica de sus obras. Entre los más grandes autores de la humanidad, esta suerte le tocó exclusivamente a él.
La razón primaria de esta particularísima condición reside en el carácter en gran medida inacabado de su obra. Si se excluyen, en efecto, los artículos periodísticos publicados en los tres lustros que van desde 1848 hasta 1862, una gran parte de los cuales estaban destinados a la “New-York Tribune”, que en esa época era uno de los más importantes periódicos del mundo, los trabajos publicados fueron relativamente pocos si se los compara con los tantos realizados sólo parcialmente y la importante mole de las investigaciones que realizó [ii] . Emblemáticamente, cuando en 1881, en uno de sus últimos años de vida, Marx fue interrogado por Karl Kautsky sobre la oportunidad de una edición completa de sus obras, respondió “éstas, antes que nada, deberían ser escritas” [iii] .
Marx dejó, por consiguiente, muchos más manuscritos de los que mandó imprimir [iv] . Contrariamente a lo que por lo general se piensa, su obra fue fragmentaria y a veces contradictoria, aspectos que evidencian una de sus características peculiares: lo inacabado del trabajo. Su método sumamente riguroso y la autocrítica más despiadada, que determinaron la imposibilidad de terminar muchos de los trabajos emprendidos; las condiciones de profunda miseria y de mala salud permanente que lo persiguieron toda la vida, la inextinguible pasión cognoscitiva, jamás alterada, que le impulsó siempre hacia nuevos estudios; y, por último, la pesada conciencia adquirida con la plena madurez de la dificultad de encerrar la complejidad de la historia en un proyecto teórico, hicieron precisamente de lo inacabado el fiel compañero y la condena de toda la producción de Marx y de su misma existencia. El colosal plan de su obra no fue realizado sino en una parte exigua y sus incesantes esfuerzos intelectuales resultaron en un fracaso literario, aunque no por eso demostraron ser menos geniales y fecundas en consecuencias extraordinarias [v] .
Sin embargo, a pesar de la fragmentariedad del Nachlaß (legado literario) de Marx y de su firme oposición a erigir una ulterior doctrina social, su obra incompleta fue subvertida y pudo surgir un nuevo sistema, el “marxismo”.
Después de la muerte de Marx en 1883, fue Friedrich Engels el primero que se dedicó a la dificilísima empresa, dadas la dispersión de los materiales, lo abstruso del lenguaje y la ilegibilidad de la grafía, de publicar el legado del amigo. El trabajo se concentró en la reconstrucción y la selección de los originales, en la publicación de los textos inéditos o incompletos y, contemporáneamente, en la reedición y traducción de los escritos más conocidos.
Aunque hubieron excepciones, como en el caso de las [Tesis sobre Feuerbach] [vi], editadas en 1888 como apéndice a su Ludwig Feuerbach y el fin de la filosofía clásica alemana, y de la [Crítica del Programa de Gotha], publicada en 1891, Engels privilegió casi exclusivamente el trabajo editorial de completar El capital, del cual había terminado solamente el libro primero. Esta tarea, que duró más de una década, fue realizada con la intención precisa de conseguir “una obra orgánica y lo más completa posible” [vii] . Tal elección, aunque respondía a exigencias comprensibles, produjo el paso de un texto parcial y provisorio, compuesto en muchas partes por “pensamientos escritos in statu nascendi” [viii] y por apuntes preliminares que Marx acostumbraba reservarse para elaboraciones ulteriores de los temas tratados, en otro unitario, que originaba la apariencia de una teoría económica sistemática y completa. De este modo, en el curso de su actividad de redacción, basada en la selección de los textos que se presentaban no como versiones finales sino, en cambio, como verdaderas variantes y en la necesidad de uniformar el conjunto de los materiales, Engels más que reconstruir la génesis y el desarrollo de los libros segundo y tercero de El Capital, que estaban bien lejos de su redacción definitiva, mandó imprimir volúmenes terminados [ix] .
Por otra parte, anteriormente, había contribuido a generar un proceso de sistematización teórica ya directamente con sus propios escritos. El Anti Duhring, aparecido en 1878, que él definiera una “exposición más o menos unitaria del método dialéctico y de la visión comunista del mundo representados por Marx y por mí” [x] , se convirtió en el referente crucial en la formación el “marxismo” como sistema y en la diferenciación de éste del socialismo ecléctico, hasta entonces prevaleciente. Una incidencia aún mayor tuvo La evolución del socialismo utópico al científico, reelaboración, con fines divulgativos, de tres capítulos del escrito precedente que, publicado por primera vez en 1880, tuvo una fortuna análoga a la del Manifiesto del partido comunista. Si bien hubo una distinción neta entre este tipo de vulgarización, realizada en polémica abierta con los atajos simplicistas de las síntesis enciclopédicas, y la que tuvo como protagonista a la generación sucesiva de la socialdemocracia alemana, la utilización por Engels de las ciencias naturales abrió el camino a la concepción evolucionista que, poco tiempo después, se afirmaría incluso en el movimiento obrero.
El pensamiento de Marx, indiscutiblemente crítico y abierto, aunque a veces atravesado por tentaciones deterministas, cayó bajo los golpes del clima cultural de la Europa de fines del 1800, permeado, como nunca antes, por concepciones sistemáticas, y en primer lugar por el darwinismo. Para responder a ellas y a la necesidad de ideología que avanzaba incluso en las filas del movimiento de los trabajadores, el recién “marxismo”, que cada vez más dejaba de ser sólo una teoría científica para convertirse también en doctrina política – transformado precozmente en ortodoxia en las páginas de la revista “Die Neue Zeit” dirigida por Kautsky – asumió rápidamente la misma conformación sistémica. En este contexto, la difusa ignorancia y aversión en el seno del partido alemán hacia Hegel, un verdadero arcano impenetrable [xi], y hacia su dialéctica, considerada hasta “el elemento no confiable de la doctrina marxista, la insidia que traba cualquier consideración coherente de las cosas” [xii] , desempeñaron un papel decisivo.
En las modalidades que acompañaron su difusión se encuentran otros factores que contribuyeron a la transformación de la obra de Marx en un sistema. Como demuestra la tirada reducida de las ediciones de la época de sus textos, se les dio preferencia a los folletos de síntesis y a compendios sumamente parciales. Algunas de sus obras, además, sufrían los efectos de las instrumentalizaciones políticas. Aparecieron así, en efecto, las primeras ediciones modificadas por los responsables de la edición, práctica que, favorecida por las incertidumbres presentes en el legado marxiano, en lo sucesivo se impuso cada vez más junto con la censura de algunos escritos. La forma manualística, vehículo notable para la exportación del pensamiento de Marx por el mundo, representó seguramente un instrumento muy eficaz de propaganda, pero también la alteración fatal de la concepción inicial. La divulgación de su obra, incompleta y compleja, en el encuentro con el positivismo y para responder mejor a las exigencias prácticas del partido proletario, se tradujo, por último, en un empobrecimiento y vulgarización del patrimonio originario [xiii] , hasta hacerlo irreconocible al transformarlo de Kritik en Weltanschauung [xiv] .
Del desarrollo de estos procesos fue tomando cuerpo una doctrina con una esquemática y elemental interpretación evolucionista, impregnada de determinismo económico: el “marxismo” del período de la Segunda Internacional (1889-1914). Guiada por una firme aunque ingenua convicción sobre la marcha automática de la historia y, por lo tanto, sobre la inevitabilidad de la sucesión del capitalismo por el socialismo, ella demostró ser incapaz de comprender el curso real del presente y, rompiendo el necesario lazo con la praxis revolucionaria, produjo un quietismo fatalista que se transformó en factor de estabilidad del orden existente [xv] . Se evidenciaba de este modo el profundo alejamiento de Marx, que ya en su primera obra había declarado “la historia no hace nada (…) no es la ‘historia’ la que se sirve del hombre como medio para realizar sus propios fines, como si ella fuese una persona particular; ella no es más que la actividad del hombre que persigue sus fines” [xvi] .
La teoría sobre el derrumbe (Zussammenbruchstheorie), o sea la tesis sobre el fin próximo de la sociedad capitalista-burguesa, que en la crisis económica de la Gran Depresión, desplegada a lo largo del veintenio sucesivo a 1873, tuvo el contexto más favorable para expresarse, fue proclamada la esencia más íntima del socialismo científico. Las afirmaciones de Marx, destinadas a delinear los principios dinámicos del capitalismo y, más en general, a describir una tendencia de desarrollo [xvii] , fueron transformadas en leyes históricas universalmente válidas [xviii] , de las cuales se podían hacer descender, hasta los particulares, el curso de los acontecimientos.
La idea de un capitalismo agonizante, autónomamente destinado al ocaso, estuvo presente también en el sustento teórico de la primera plataforma enteramente “marxista” de un partido político, El programa de Erfurt de 1891, y en el comentario que del mismo hizo Kautsky, que enunciaba como “el incontenible desarrollo económico lleva a la bancarrota del modo de producción capitalista con necesidad de ley natural. La creación de una nueva forma de sociedad en lugar de la actual ya no es sólo algo deseable sino que se ha hecho inevitable” [xix] . Él fue la representación, más significativa y evidente, de los límites intrínsecos de la elaboración de la época, así como de la distancia abismal que se había producido de quien había sido el inspirador.
El mismo Eduard Bernstein, que al concebir el socialismo como posibilidad y no como inevitabilidad había marcado una discontinuidad con las interpretaciones dominantes en ese período, hizo una lectura de Marx igualmente deformada que no se separaba mínimamente de las de su tiempo y contribuyó a difundir, mediante la vasta resonancia que tuvo el Bernstein-Debatte, una imagen de aquélla igualmente alterada e instrumental.
El “marxismo ruso”, que en el curso del siglo XIX desempeñó un papel fundamental en la divulgación del pensamiento de Marx, siguió esta trayectoria de sistematización y vulgarización incluso con mayor rigidez.
Para su pionero más importante, Gueorgui Plejánov, en efecto, “el marxismo es una completa concepción del mundo” [xx] , marcada por un monismo simplista según el cual las transformaciones superestructurales de la sociedad avanzan de manera simultánea con las modificaciones económicas. En Materialismo y empiriocriticismo, de 1909, Lenin define al materialismo como “el reconocimiento de la ley objetiva de la naturaleza y del reflejo aproximadamente fiel de esta ley en la cabeza del hombre” [xxi] . La voluntad y la conciencia del género humano deben “inevitable y necesariamente” [xxii] adecuarse a las necesidades de la naturaleza. Una vez más prevalece el planteo positivista.
Por consiguiente, y a pesar del áspero choque ideológico que se produjo durante estos años, muchos de los elementos teóricos característicos de la deformación producida por la Segunda Internacional se trasladaron a quienes habrían puesto su marca en la matriz cultural de la Tercera Internacional. Esta continuidad se manifestó, con aún mayor evidencia, en la Teoría del materialismo histórico, publicado en 1921 por Nikolai Bujarin, según el cual “tanto en la naturaleza como en la sociedad, los fenómenos son regulados por determinadas leyes. La primera tarea de la ciencia es descubrir esta regularidad” [xxiii] . Este determinismo social, totalmente centrado sobre el desarrollo de las fuerzas productivas, generó una doctrina según la cual “la multiplicidad de las causas que hacen sentir su acción en la sociedad no contradice de ningún modo la existencia de una ley única de la evolución social” [xxiv] .
La crítica de Antonio Gramsci, que se opuso a esa concepción para la cual “el planteo del problema como una investigación de leyes, de líneas constantes, regulares, uniformes está ligada a una exigencia, concebida de modo un poco pueril e ingenuo, de resolver perentoriamente el problema práctico de la previsibilidad de los acontecimientos históricos” [xxv] , reviste particular interés. Su neta negativa a restringir la filosofía de la praxis marxiana a una grosera sociología, a “reducir una concepción el mundo a un formulario mecánico que da la impresión de tener toda la historia en el bolsillo” [xxvi] , fue particularmente importante porque iba más allá de lo escrito por Bujarin y buscaba condenar la orientación bastante más general que después habría prevalecido, de modo indiscutido, en la Unión Soviética.
Con la consolidación del “marxismo leninismo”, el proceso de deformación del pensamiento de Marx conoció su manifestación definitiva. La teoría fue desplazada de la función de guía del actuar convirtiéndose, por el contrario, en su justificación a posteriori. El punto de no retorno fue alcanzado con el “Diamat” (Dialekticeskij materializm), “la concepción del mundo del partido marxista-leninista” [xxvii] . El folleto de Stalin de 1938, Sobre el materialismo dialéctico y el materialismo histórico, que tuvo una extraordinaria difusión, fijaba los rasgos esenciales: los fenómenos de la vida colectiva son regulados por las “leyes necesarias del desarrollo social”, “perfectamente cognoscibles”; “la historia de la sociedad se presenta como un desarrollo necesario de la sociedad, y el estudio de la historia de la sociedad se convierte en una ciencia”. Eso “quiere decir que la ciencia de la historia de la sociedad, a pesar de toda la complejidad de los fenómenos de la vida social, puede convertirse en una ciencia igualmente exacta, por ejemplo, que la biología, capaz de utilizar las leyes de desarrollo de la sociedad para utilizarlas en la práctica” [xxviii] y que, por consiguiente, es tarea del partido del proletariado fundamentar su actividad sobre la base de estas leyes. Es evidente cómo la confusión sobre los conceptos de “científico” y “ciencia” había llegado al máximo. La cientificidad del método marxiano, fundada sobre criterios teóricos escrupulosos y coherentes, fue reemplazada por el modo de proceder de las ciencias naturales que no contemplaba ninguna contradicción.
Junto a este catecismo ideológico, encontró terreno fértil el dogmatismo más rígido e intransigente. Completamente extraño y separado de la complejidad social, el mismo se sostenía, como siempre ocurre cuando se formula un planteo en un tan arrogante cuanto infundado conocimiento de la realidad. Acerca del inexistente lazo con Marx, basta recordar su sentencia preferida: de omnibus dubitandum [xxix] .
La ortodoxia “marxista-leninista” impuso un monismo inflexible que produjo efectos perversos también en los escritos de Marx. Indiscutiblemente, con la Revolución Soviética el “marxismo” vivió un momento significativo de expansión y circulación en ámbitos geográficos y clases sociales de los cuales, hasta entonces, había sido excluido. Sin embargo, una vez más, la difusión de los textos, más que remitirse directamente a los de Marx, se concentraba en los manuales de partido, vademécum, antologías “marxistas” sobre muy diversos argumentos. Además, fue cada vez más común la censura de algunas obras, el desmembramiento y la manipulación de otras, así como la práctica de la extrapolación y del astuto montaje de las citas. A éstas, a las cuales se recurría con fines preordenados, se les dio el mismo trato que el bandido Procusto reservaba a sus víctimas: si eran demasiado largas, se las amputaba, si demasiado cortas, eran alargadas.
En conclusión, la relación entre la divulgación y la no esquematización de un pensamiento, con mayor razón el crítico y voluntariamente no sistémico de Marx, entre su popularización y la exigencia de no empobrecerlo, es sin duda una empresa difícil de realizar. De todos modos, a Marx no podría haberle ido peor.
Plegado de distintos lados en función de contingencias y necesidades políticas, fue asimilado a éstas y en su nombre fue vituperado. Su teoría, que era crítica, fue utilizada como las exégesis de los versículos bíblicos. Nacieron así las paradojas más impensables. Contrario a “prescribir recetas (…) para la hostería del futuro” [xxx] , fue transformado en el padre ilegítimo de un nuevo sistema social. Crítico rigurosísimo y siempre insatisfecho de sus resultados, se convirtió en la fuente del más obstinado doctrinarismo. Defensor incansable de la concepción materialista de la historia, fue sacado de su contexto histórico mucho más que cualquier otro autor. Seguro de “que la emancipación de la clase obrera debe ser obra de los trabajadores mismos” [xxxi] , fue enjaulado en una ideología en la que prevalecía, en cambio, la primacía de las vanguardias políticas y del partido en el papel de propulsor de la conciencia de clase y de guía de la revolución. Propugnador de la idea de que la condición para la maduración de la capacidad humana era la reducción de la jornada de trabajo, fue asimilado al credo productivista del stajanovismo. Convencido promotor de la abolición del Estado, se encontró identificado como baluarte del mismo. Interesado como pocos otros pensadores por el libre desarrollo de las individualidades de los hombres, que afirmaba, contra el derecho burgués que esconde las desigualdades sociales detrás de una mera igualdad legal, que “el derecho, en vez de ser igual, debería ser desigual” [xxxii] , ha sido incorporado a una concepción que ha neutralizado la investigación de la dimensión colectiva en el indistinto de la homologación.
El originario carácter inacabado del gran trabajo crítico de Marx fue sometido a las presiones de la sistematización de los epígonos que produjeron, inexorablemente, la deformación de su pensamiento hasta borrarlo y anularlo y convertirlo en su negación manifiesta.

Un autor mal conocido
“¿Los escritos de Marx y Engels (…) fueron alguna vez leídos por entero por nadie que estuviese fuera de las filas de los amigos próximos y los adeptos y, por consiguiente, de los seguidores e intérpretes directos de los autores?”. Así se interrogaba Antonio Labriola, en 1897, sobre cuánto de la obra de aquéllos fuese hasta entonces conocido. Sus conclusiones fueron inequivocas: “leer todos los escritos de los fundadores del socialismo científico pareció hasta ahora un privilegio de iniciados”; el “materialismo histórico” había llegado a los pueblos de lenguas neolatinas “a través de una serie de equívocos, malentendidos, de alteraciones grotescas, de extraños disfraces y de invenciones gratuitas” [xxxiii] . Un “marxismo” imaginario. En efecto, como fue demostrado posteriormente por la investigación historiográfica, la convicción de que Marx y Engels fuesen verdaderamente leídos ha sido el fruto de una leyenda hagiográfica. Por el contrario, muchos de sus textos eran raros o imposibles de encontrar incluso en la lengua original y, por lo tanto, la invitación del estudioso italiano a dar vida a “una edición completa y crítica de todos los escritos de Marx y Engels” [xxxiv] , indicaba una ineludible necesidad general. En opinión de Labriola, no era necesario ni compilar antologías, ni redactar un testamentum juxta canonem receptum, sino “todo el trabajo científico y político, toda la producción literaria, aunque fuese ocasional, de los dos fundadores del socialismo crítico, debe ser puesta al alcance de los lectores (…) para que ellos hablen directamente a todos los que tengan ganas de leerlos” [xxxv] . Más de un siglo después de este deseo, este proyecto aún no ha sido realizado.
Junto a estas evaluaciones prevalentemente filológicas, Labriola planteaba otras de carácter teórico, de sorprendente previsión con respecto a la época en que vivió. Consideraba que todos los escritos y trabajos de Marx y de Engels no terminados eran “los fragmentos de una ciencia y de una política que está en continuo devenir”. Para evitar buscar en su interior “lo que no está y no debe estar”, o sea, “una especie de vulgata o de preceptos para la interpretación de cualquier tiempo y lugar”, ellos podían ser plenamente comprendidos sólo volviéndolos a colocar en el momento y el contexto de su génesis. De no ser así, los que “no entienden el pensar y el saber como trabajos que están en curso”, o sea “los doctrinarios y los presuntuosos de todo tipo que tienen necesidad de los ídolos de la mente, los hacedores de sistemas clásicos buenos para la eternidad, los compiladores de manuales y de enciclopedias, buscarán en el marxismo, al revés y al derecho, lo que éste jamás pretendió ofrecer a nadie” [xxxvi] : una solución sumaria y fideísta a las interrogaciones de la historia.
El ejecutor natural de la realización de la opera omnia no habría podido ser otro que el Sozialdemokratische Partei Deutschlands, detentor del Nachlaß y de las mayores competencias linguísticas y teóricas. Sin embargo, los conflictos políticos en el seno de la Socialdemocracia no sólo impidieron la publicación de la imponente e importante masa de trabajos inéditos de Marx, sino que produjeron también la dispersión de sus manuscritos, comprometiendo así cualquier hipótesis de edición sistemática [xxxvii] . Sorprendentemente el partido alemán no construyó ninguna y trató la herencia literaria de Marx y de Engels con la máxima negligencia [xxxviii] . Ninguno de sus teóricos se ocupó de hacer una lista del legado intelectual de los dos fundadores, que estaba compuesto por muchos manuscritos incompletos y por proyectos no llevados a término. Aún menos hubo quien se dedicase a recoger la correspondencia, voluminosa pero extremadamente diseminada, aunque ésta es utilísima como fuente de esclarecimiento, cuando no incluso de continuación, de sus escritos. La biblioteca, por último, que tenía los libros que ellos poseían con interesantes notas marginales y subrayados, fue ignorada, en parte dispersada y sólo posteriormente costosamente reconstruida y catalogada [xxxix] .
La primera publicación de las obras completas, la Marx Engels Gesamtausgabe (MEGA) comenzó recién en los años veinte, por iniciativa de David Borisovich Riazanov, principal conocedor de Marx en el siglo diecinueve y director del Instituto Marx-Engels de Moscú. Sin embargo también esta empresa naufragó a causa de los tempestuosos acontecimientos que vivió el movimiento obrero internacional, los cuales muy a menudo pusieron trabas a la edición de sus textos en vez de favorecerla. Las depuraciones stalinistas en la Unión Soviética, que se abatieron también sobre los estudiosos que dirigían el proyecto, y el triunfo del nazismo en Alemania, condujeron a la precoz interrupción de la edición, tornando vano también este intento. Se produjo así la contradicción absoluta del nacimiento de una ideología inflexible que se inspiraba en un autor cuya gigantesca obra todavía permanecía en parte inexplorada. La afirmación del “marxismo” y su cristalización como corpus dogmático precedieron al conocimiento de los textos cuya lectura era indispensable para comprender la formación y la evolución del pensamiento de Marx [xl] . Los principales trabajos juveniles, en efecto, sólo fueron impresos con la MEGA:[ Sobre la crítica de la filosofía hegeliana del derecho público.] en 1927, los [ Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844] y [La idelogía alemana] en 1932 – y, como ya había sucedido con los libros segundo y tercero de El capital, en ediciones en las que aparecían como obras terminadas, opción que posteriormente engendró muchos malentendidos interpretativos. Sucesivamente, y con tirajes que sólo pudieron asegurar una escasísima difusión, se publicaron algunos importantes trabajos preparatorios de El capital: en 1933 el[Capítulo VI inédito] y entre 1939 y 1941 los [Lineamientos fundamentales de la crítica de la economía política], más conocidos como Grundrisse. Estos inéditos, además, como los otros que siguieron, cuando no fueron escondidos por el temor de que pudiesen erosionar el canon ideológico dominante, estaban acompañados por una interpretación funcional a las exigencias políticas que, en el mejor de los casos, aportaba ajustes previsibles a dicha interpretación ya predeterminada y jamás se tradujeron en una seria rediscusión de conjunto de la obra.
El tortuoso proceso de difusión de los escritos de Marx y la carencia de una edición integral de los mismos, unidos a su carácter originario ya incompleto, al trabajo pésimo de los epígonos, a las lecturas tendenciosas y a las aún más numerosas no lecturas, son la causa fundamental de la gran paradoja: Karl Marx es un autor mal conocido, víctima de una profunda y reiterada incomprensión [xli] . Lo ha sido durante el período en el que el “marxismo” era política y culturalmente hegemónico, y todavía hoy sigue siéndolo.

Una obra para hoy
Liberada de la odiosa función de instrumentum regni, al que había sido destinada en el pasado, y de la falacia del “marxismo”, del cual fue definitivamente separada, la obra de Marx, todavía parcialmente inédita, reaparece en su aspecto original no acabado y es nuevamente presentada a los libres campos del saber. Una vez sustraída a sus autonombrados propietarios y a modos de empleo constrictivos [xlii] por fin se ha hecho posible el pleno despliegue de su preciosa e inmensa herencia teórica.
Con el auxilio de la filología encuentran una respuesta la ya ineludible exigencia del reconocimiento de las fuentes, durante tanto tiempo envueltas y mistificadas por la propaganda apologética, y la necesidad de disponer de un índice seguro y definitivo de todos los manuscritos de Marx. Ella se ofrece como medio imprescindible para aclarar el texto, restableciéndole el horizonte problemático y polimorfo originario y evidenciando la enorme distancia que existe entre él y muchas de las interpretaciones y de las experiencias políticas que, aunque hayan pretendido apoyarse en él, han transmitido del mismo una percepción sumamente reductiva. Leer a Marx con la intención de reconstruir la génesis de sus escritos y el cuadro histórico en que nacieron, de poner en evidencia la importancia de la deuda intelectual en la elaboración, de considerar su carácter constantemente multidisciplinario [xliii] , tal es la complicada tarea que tiene ante sí la nueva Marx Forschung (investigación sobre Marx) y que necesita, para ser realizada, una orientación permanentemente crítica y alejada del condicionamiento engañoso de la ideología.
Sin embargo, la de Marx no es solamente una obra carente de una adecuada interpretación crítica que pueda hacerle justicia a su genio [xliv] , sino que es también una obra en una constante investigación por su autor.
Las reflexiones de Marx están atravesadas por una diferencia irreducible, por un carácter absolutamente particular respecto a las de la mayor parte de los otros pensadores. Ellas están unidas por un lazo inescindible entre la teoría y la praxis y se dirigen persistentemente a un sujeto privilegiado y concreto: “el movimiento real que lleva a la abolición del estado de las cosas presente” ( die wirkliche Bewegung welche den jetzigen Zustand aufhebt) al cual se le confía “el derribamiento y la inversión práctica de las relaciones sociales existentes” (den praktischen Umsturz der realen gesellschftlichen Verhältnisse) [xlv] . Creer que se puede relegar el patrimonio teórico y político de Marx a un pasado que ya no tendría nada que decir a los conflictos actuales, y circunscribirlo a la función de clásico momificado con un interés inofensivo para los días de hoy o encerrarlo en especialismos meramente especulativos, sería algo tan erróneo como su anterior transformación en la esfinge del gris socialismo real del siglo pasado.
Su obra conserva confines y pretensiones mucho más amplios que los ámbitos de las disciplinas académicas. Sin el pensamiento de Marx faltarían los conceptos para comprender y describir el mundo contemporáneo, así como los instrumentos críticos para invertir la subalternidad al credo imperante que presume poder representar el presente con las semblanzas antihistóricas de la naturalidad y de la inmutabilidad. Sin Marx estaríamos condenados a una verdadera afasia crítica.
No debe engañarnos la aparente inactualidad y el dogma absoluto y unánime que decreta con certeza el olvido. Sus ideas podrán en cambio provocar nuevos entusiasmos, estimular fecundas reflexiones ulteriores y sufrir otras alteraciones. La causa de la emancipación humana todavía deberá ponerlo a su servicio.
Crítico sin igual del sistema de producción capitalista, Karl Marx será fundamental hasta la superación de aquél.
Su “espectro” está destinado a recorrer el mundo y a hacer que la humanidad se agite todavía durante mucho tiempo.

Apéndice: Cronología de las obras de Marx [xlvi]

AÑO  TÍTULO DE LA OBRA INFORMACIÓN SOBRE LAS EDICIONES
1841 [Diferencia entre la filosofía de la naturaleza de Demócrito y la de Epicuro]

1902: en Aus dem literarischen Nachlass von Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels und Ferdinand Lassalle, compilada por Mehring (version parcial).

1927: en MEGA I/1.1, compilada por Riazanov.

1842-43 Artículos para la Gaceta Renana Periódico que se imprimía en Colonia
1844 [Sobre la crítica de la filosofía hegeliana del derecho público] 1927: en MEGA I/1.1, a cargo de Riazanov.
1844 Ensayos para los Anales Franco-Alemanes Incluidos en Sobre la cuestión judía y Para la crítica de la filosofía del derecho de Hegel. Introducción. Número único publicado en París. La mayor parte de los ejemplares fue confiscada por la policía.
1845 [Manuscritos económico-filosóficos de 1844] 1932: en Der historische Materialismus, a cargo de Landshut y Mayer y en MEGA I/3, a cargo de Adoratsky (las ediciones difieren en su contenido y en el orden de las partes). El texto fui excluido de los volúmenes numerados de la MEW y publicado por separado.
1845 La Sagrada Familia (con Engels) Publicado en Frankfort sobre el Mein.
1845 [Tesis sobre Feuerbach] 1888: en apéndice a la reimpresión de Ludwig Fuerbach y el fin de la filosofía clásica alemana de Engels.
1845-46 [La ideología alemana] (con Engels)

1903-1904: en Dokumente des Sozialismus, a cargo de Bernstein (versión parcial y manipulada).

1932: en Der historische Materialismus, a cargo de Landshut y Mayer, y en MEGA I/3, a cargo de Adoratsky (las ediciones difieren en su contenido y en el orden de las partes).

1847 Miseria de la filosofía Impreso en Bruselas y París. Texto en francés.
1848 Discurso sobre la cuestión del libre cambio Publicado en Bruselas. Texto en francés.
1848 Manifiesto del partido comunista (con Engels) Impreso en Londres. Conquistó cierta difusión a partir de los años setenta.
1848-49 Artículos para la Nueva Gaceta Renana Periódico de Colonia. Entre ellos figura Trabajo asalariado y capital.
1850 Artículos para la Nueva Gaceta Renana. Revista político-económica Fascículos mensuales impresos en Hamburgo y de exiguo tiraje. Comprenden Las luchas de clase en Francia desde 1848 a 1850.
1851-62 Artículos para el New-York Tribune Muchos artículos fueron redactados por Engels.
1852 El dieciocho Brumario de Luis Bonaparte Publicado en Nueva York en el primer fascículo de Die Revolution. La mayor parte de los ejemplares no pudo ser retirada de la imprenta por dificultades financieras. A Europa llegó solamente un número insignificante de copias. La segunda edición –reelaborada por Marx – apareció sólo en 1869.
1852 [Los grandes hombres del exilio] (con Engels) 1930: en “Archiv Marksa i Engel’sa” (edición rusa). El manuscrito había sido ocultado precedentemente por Bernstein.
1853 Revelaciones sobre el proceso contra los comunistas de Colonia Impreso como anónimo en Basilea (casi todos los dos mil ejemplares fueron secuestrados por la policía) y en Boston. En 1874 fue reimpreso en el Volksstaat y Marx aparece como autor; en 1875 versión en libro.
1854 El caballero de la noble conciencia Publicado en Nueva York como folleto.
1856-57 Revelaciones sobre la historia diplomática del siglo dieciocho Aunque había sido ya publicado por Marx, después fue omitido y sólo fue publicado en Europa oriental en 1986 en la MECW. Texto en inglés.
1857-58 [Introducción a los Lineamientos fundamentales de la crítica de la economía política] 1903: en Die Neue Zeit, a cargo de Kautsky, con notables discordancias con el original.
1859 Para la crítica de la economía política Impreso en Berlín en mil ejemplares.
1860 Herr Vogt Impreso en Londres con escasa resonancia.
1861-63 [Para la crítica de la economía política (Manuscrito 1861-1863)]

1905-1910: Teorías sobre la plusvalía; a cargo de Kautsky (versión manipulada). El texto fiel al original recién apareció en 1954 (edición rusa) y en 1956 (edición alemana).

1976-1982: publicación integral de todo el manuscrito en MEGA² II/3.1-3.6.

1863-64 [Sobre la cuestión polaca] 1961: Manuskripte über die polnische Frag, a cargo del IISG.
1863-67 [Manuscritos económicos 1863-67]
1894: El capital. Libro tercero. El proceso global de la producción capitalista, a cargo de Engels (basado también sobre manuscritos sucesivos, editados en MEGA² II/14 y en preparación en MEGA² II/4.3).

1933: Libro primero. Capítulo VI inédito, en “Archiv Marksa i Engel’sa” (edición rusa).

1988: publicación de manuscritos del Libro primero y del Libro segundo,en MEGA² II/4.1.

1992: publicación de manuscritos del Libro tercero, en MEGA² II/4.2.

1864-72 Discursos, resoluciones, circulares, manifiestos, programas, estatutos para la Asociación Internacional de los Trabajadores Incluyen el Mensaje inaugural de la Asociación internacional de los trabajadores, La guerra civil en Francia y Las llamadas escisiones en la Internacional (con Engels). Por lo general, textos en inglés.
1865 [Salario, precio y ganancia] 1898: a cargo de Eleanor Marx. Texto en inglés.
1867 El capital. Libro primero. El proceso de producción del capital Editado en mil ejemplares en Hamburgo. Segunda edición en 1873 de tres mil copias. Traducción rusa en 1872.
1870 [Manuscrito para el libro segundo de El capital] 1885: El capital. Libro segundo. El proceso de circulación del capital, a cargo de Engels (basado también sobre el manuscrito de 1880-1881 y sobre los otros más breves de 1867-1868 y de 1877-1878, en preparación en MEGA² II/11).
1872-75 El capital. Libro primero: El proceso de producción del capital (edición francesa) Texto reelaborado para la traducción francesa publicada en fascículos. Según Marx tiene “un valor científico independiente del original”.
1874-75 [Notas sobre “Estado y Anarquía” de Bakunin] 1928: en Letopisi marxisma, prefacio de Riazanov (edición rusa). Manuscritos con extractos en ruso y comentarios en alemán.
1875 [Crítica al Programa de Gotha] 1891: en Die Neue Zeit, a cargo de Engels, que modificó algunos trechos del original.
1875 [La relación entre la cuota de plusvalía y la cuota de ganancia desarrollada matemáticamente] 2003: en MEGA² II/14.
1877 Sobre la “Historia crítica” (capítulo del Anti-Dühring de Engels) Publicado parcialmente en el Vorwärts y después íntegramente en la edición como libro.
1879-80 [Anotaciones sobre “La propiedad común rural” de Kovalevsky] 1977: en Karl Marx über Formen vorkapitalischer Produktion, a cargo del IISG.
1880-81 [Extractos de “La sociedad antigua” de Morgan] 1972: en The Ethnological Notebooks of Karl Marx, a cargo del IISG. Manuscritos con extractos en inglés.
1881 [Glosas marginales al “Manual de economía política” de Wagner]

1932: en El Capital (versión parcial).

1933: en SOČ XV (edición rusa).

1881-82 [Extractos cronológicos desde el 90 a.C hasta el 1648 ca.]

1938-1939: en “Archiv Marksa i Engel’sa” (versión parcial, edición rusa).

1953: en Marx,Engels, Lenin, Stalin, Zur deutschen Geschichte (versión parcial).

 

References
[i] Boris Nikolaevsky, Otto Maenchen Helfen, Karl Marx. La vita e l’ opera, Einaudi, Turín, 1969, p.7
[ii] El testimonio más significativo del ciclópico trabajo de Marx son los compendios y apuntes de estudios que nos legó. En efecto, desde el período universitario Marx adoptó el hábito, que conservó toda la vida, de compilar cuadernos de extractos de los libros que leía, intercalando a menudo las reflexiones que ellos le sugerían. El Nachlaß de Marx contiene doscientos veinte cuadernos y libretas de resúmenes, esenciales para el conocimiento y la comprensión de la génesis de su teoría y de las partes de ella que no pudo desarrollar como habría deseado. Sus extractos conservados, que abarcan el largo arco de tiempo que va desde 1838 hasta 1882, están escritos en ocho lenguas – griego antiguo, latín, alemán, francés, inglés, italiano, español y ruso – y cubren las más variadas disciplinas. Fueron tomados de textos de filosofía, arte, religión, política, derecho, literatura, historia, economía política, relaciones internacionales, técnica, matemática, fisiología, geología, mineralogía, agronomía, etnología, química y física, además que de artículos de cotidianos y revistas, actas parlamentarias, estadísticas, informes y publicaciones de oficinas gubernamentales – tal es el caso de los famosos Blue Books, en particular de los Reports of the inspectors of factories, investigaciones que tuvieron gran importancia para sus estudios. Esta inmensa mina de saber, en gran parte aún inédita, fue la cantera de donde Marx extrajo su teoría crítica. La cuarta sección de la MEGA², Exzerpts, Notizen, Marginalien, concebida en treintaidós volúmenes, cuando esté completa, permitirá el acceso a la misma.
[iii] Benedikt Kautsky (coordinador de), Friedrich Engels’Briefwechsel mit Karl Kautsky, Danubia Verlag, Viena 1955, p. 32
[iv] Véase al respecto la cronología de sus obras, en el Apéndice.
[v] Cons. Maximilien Rubel, Marx critique du marxisme, Payot, París, 2000 (1974), pp. 439-440.
[vi] En el presente ensayo los manuscritos incompletos de Marx publicados por editores sucesivos, se insertan entre corchetes.
[vii] Friedrich Engels Vorwort a Karl Marx, Das Kapital, Zweiter Band. Marx Engels Werke, Band 24, Dietz Verlag, Berlín, 1963, p. 7 OJO: PONER LAS EDICIONES EN CASTELLANO
[viii] Friedrich Engels Vorwort a Karl Marx Das Kapital, Dritter Band, MEGA² II/15, Akademie Verlag, Berlín 2004, p. 7. OJO: PONER LAS EDICIONES EN CASTELLANO
[ix] Las adquisiciones filológicas más recientes calculan que las intervenciones de Engels, durante su trabajo de editor, sobre los manuscritos de los libros segundo y tercero de El Capital, ascienden a casi cinco mil. Una cantidad muy superior a la que hasta hoy se calculaba. Las modificaciones consiste en agregados y cancelaciones de pasajes, substituciones de conceptos, transformaciones de algunas formulaciones de Marx o traducciones de palabras que éste había utilizado en otras lenguas, estarán disponibles, todas ellas, con la conclusión, ya próxima, de la segunda sección de la MEGA², Das Capital und Vorarbeiten. La misma comprenderá la publicación integral de todas las ediciones autorizadas de El Capital (incluidas las traducciones) y de todos sus manuscritos preparatorios, a partir de los de 1857-1858. La terminación de esta empresa consentirá, por último, una evaluación crítica cierta sobre el estado de los originales dejados por Marx y sobre el papel desempeñado por Engels en calidad de editor.
[x] Friedrich Engels, Vorworte zu den drei Auflagen de Herrn Eugen Dührings Umwälzung der Wissenschaft, MEGA² I/27, Dietz Verlag, Berlín, 1988, p. 492 (OJO. PONER EDICION CASTELLANA)
[xi] Cons. Hans Josef Steinberg, Il socialismo tedesco da Bebel a Kautsky, Editori Riuniti, Roma, 1979, pp. 72-77.
[xii] Eduard Bernstein, I presupposti del socialismo e i compiti della socialdemocrazia, Laterza, Bari, 1868, p. 58 (CREO QUE HAY UNA EDICION ESPAÑOLA, ALGO ASÍ COMO :LAS BASES DEL SOCIALISMO Y LAS TAREAS DE LA SOCIALDEMOCRACIA)
[xiii] Cons. Franco Andreucci, La diffusione e la volgarizzazione del marxismo, en Aa.Vv., Storia del marxismo, vol. segundo, Einaudi, Turín, p. 15.
[xiv] De crítica a concepción de vida y del mundo (N. del T.)
[xv] Cons. Erich Matthias, Kautsky e il kautskismo, De Donato, Bari 1971, p.124.
[xvi] Friedrich Engels, Karl Marx, Die heilige Familie, Marx Engels Werke, Band 2, Dietz Verlag, Berlín, 1962, p. 98. trad. Española OJO: PONER LA EDICION DE LA SAGRADA FAMILIA
[xvii] Cons. Paul Sweezy, La teoria dello sviluppo capitalistico, Boringhieri, Turín, 1970, p. 225 .OJO: PONER LA TRAD. CASTELLANA DE LA TEORIA DEL DESARROLLO CAPITALISTA
[xviii] Cons. Hans Josef Steinberg, Il partito e la formazione dell’ortodossia marxista, en Aa. Vv, Storia del marxismo, vol. segundo, Einaudi, Turín, 1979, p.190.
[xix] Karl Kautsky, Il programa de Erfurt, Samonà e Savelli, Roma 1971, p. 123. OJO. PONER EDICION CASTELLANA
[xx] Giogui Plejanov, Las cuestiones fundamentales del marxismo (PONER EDICION CSTELLANA)
[xxi] Vladimir Ilich Lenin, Materialismo ed empiriocriticismo, en Vladimir Ilich Lenin, Opere complete, vol.XIV, Editori Riuniti, Roma, 1963, p.152. OJO PONER LA TRAD. CASTELLANA
[xxii] Id., p. 185.
[xxiii] Nikolai I. Bujarin, Teoría del materialismo storico, La Nuova Italia, Florencia, 1977, p. 16. OJO. PONER VERSION CASTELLANA
[xxiv] Idem., p. 252.
[xxv] Antonio Gramsci, Quaderni del carcere, (editados por Valentino Gerratana), Einaudi, Turín, 1975, p. 1403. OJO. PONER LA EDICION CASTELLANA
[xxvi] Idem, p. 1428.
[xxvii] Josef Stalin, Del materialismo dialettico e del materialismo storico, Edizioni Movimento Studentesco, Milán 1973, p. 919. OJO: COLOCAR LA VERSION CASTELLANA
[xxviii] Idem, pp. 926-927.
[xxix] Cons. Izumi Omura, Valery Fomichev, Rolf Hecker, Shun-Ichi Kubo (coordinador), Familie Marx privat, Akademie Verlag, Berlín 2005, p.235.
[xxx] Karl Marx, Nachwort a Das Capital, Erster Band, MEGA² II/6, Dietz Verlag, Berlín 1987, p. 704 OJO. PONER LA TRADUCCION CASTELLANA DEL POSTFACIO A LA SEGUNDA EDICION DE “EL CAPITAL”, LIBRO PRIMERO)
[xxxi] Karl Marx, Provisional Rules of the internacional Working Men’s Association, MEGA I/20, Akademie Verlag, Berlín, 2003 (1992), p. 13. trad. española Estatutos provisorios de la Asociación Internacional de los Trabajadores OJO: PONER TITULO DE LA EDICION CASTELLANA DONDE FIGURAN Y PAGINA
[xxxii] Karl Marx, Kritik des Gothaer Programms, Marx Engels Werke, Band 19, Dietz Verlag, Berlín, 1962, p. 21; trad. española OJO. PONER TITULO DE LA EDICION CASTELLANA DE LA CRITICA DEL PROGRAMA DE GOTHA.
[xxxiii] Antonio Labriola, Discorrendo di socialismo e filosofia. Scritti filosofici e politici, (editados por Franco Sbarbieri), Einmaudi, Turín, 1973, pp. 667-669. VER SI HAY EDICION CASTELLANA DE LOS Escritos filosóficos y políticos de Labriola
[xxxiv] En su texto Labriola trazaba un esquema preciso de los caracteres de la ediciónm, que habría debido se “acompañada, caso por caso, por prefacios declarativois, índices de referencias, notas y referencias (…) A los escritos ya publicados como libros o folletos convendría agregarles los artículos para los periódicos, los manifiestos, las circulares, los programas, y todas las cartas que, por ser de interés público y general, aunque fuesen dirigidas a personas privadas, tienen importancia política o científica” Id. p. 671.
[xxxv] Id., p. 672.
[xxxvi] Id., pp. 673-677.
[xxxvii] Cons. Maximilien Rubel, Bibliographie des oeuvres de Karl Marx, Rivière, París. 1956, p. 27.
[xxxviii] Cons. David Riazanov, Neuste Mitteilungen über den literarischen Nachlasß von Karl Marx und Friedrich Engels, in “Archiv für die Geschichte des Sozialismus und der Arbeiterbewegung”, Hirschfeld, Leipzig, 1925, en particular pp. 385-386.
[xxxix] Al respecto remitirse al Einführung del volumen MEGA² IV/32, Die Bibliotheken von Karl Marx und Fridrich Engels, Akademie Verlag, Berlín 1999, pp. 7-97.
[xl] Cons. Maximilien Rubel, Marx critique du marxisme, op.cit., p. 81 (VER SI HAY TRAD. CASTELLANA). La infatigable campaña de denuncia de la investigación marxológica de Maximilien Rubel, sobre la profunda diferencia existente entre Marx y el “marxismo”, llegó a considerar a este último como “el mayor, si no el más trágico, malentendido del siglo”.
[xli] Junto al desconocimiento “marxista” que hasta aquí hemos querido esbozar habría que considerar también el “antimarxista” de origen liberal y conservador, que es igualmente profundo porque está cargado de prevención y hostilidad. Como aquí no es posible evaluarlo, será objeto de sucesivas profundizaciones.
[xlii] Cons. Daniel Bensaid, Passion Karl Marx, Textuel, París 2001, p. 181.
[xliii] Véase al respecto Bruno Buongiovanni, Leggere Marx dopo il marxismo, en “Belfagor” nº 5 (1995), p. 590.
[xliv] Cons. Maximilien Rubel, Karl Marx, Colibrì, Milán, 2001, p. 18.
[xlv] Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, Joseph Weydemeyer, Die deutsche Ideologie. Artikel, Druckvorlagen, Entwürfe, Rienschriftenfragmente und Notizen zu “I.Feurbach” und II.Sankt Bruno”en “Marx-Engels-Jarbuch 2003”, Akademie Verlag, Berlín 2004, pp. 21 y 29. (PONER LA TRADUCCION ESPAÑOLA DE LA IDEOLOGIA ALEMANA).
[xlvi] Tomando en consideración la mole de la producción intelectual de Marx, la cronología no fue redactada sobre la base del criterio de la totalidad sino que se refiere exclusivamente a las obras más significativas. Intentamos así hacer evidente el carácter incompleto de tantos escritos de Marx y las vicisitudes relativas a su publicación. Para responder al primer propósito, los títulos de los manuscritos que él no mandó a la imprenta están insertados entre corchetes, diferenciándolos así de los volúmenes y de los artículos que en cambio fueron terminados. De este modo aparece cómo la parte incompleta prevalece sobre la concluida. Para destacar el segundo objetivo, en cambio, una columna con informaciones sobre las ediciones de los trabajos que aparecieron con carácter póstumo especifica el año de la primera publicación, la referencia bibliográfica y, cuando sea pertinente, quién estuvo a cargo de la misma. Se señalan eventuales modificaciones del original. También se dan breves noticias sobre las obras mandadas imprimir por el autor. Además, cuando el texto o el manuscrito de Marx no fue redactado en alemán, se indica la lengua en que fue escrito. Abreviaciones utilizadas: MEGA (Marx-Engels-Gesamtausgabe, 1927-1935); SOČ K. Marks i Engel’sa Sočinenjia, 1928-1946); MEW ( Marx-Engels-Werke, 1956-1968; MECW (Marx-Engels-Collected-Works, 1975-2004); MEGA² (Marx-Engels-Gesamtausgabe, 1975…); IISG (Internationaal Instituut voor Sociale Geschiedenis de Amsterdam).

Categories
Book chapter

Introduction

1. From the Grundrisse to the Critical Analysis of Theories of Surplus Value
Marx started to write Capital only many years after he had begun his rigorous studies of political economy. From 1843 onwards, he had already been working, with great intensity, towards what he would later define as his own ‘Economics’.1
It was the eruption of the financial crisis of 1857 that forced Marx to start his work. Marx was convinced that the crisis developing at international level had created the conditions for a new revolutionary period throughout Europe. He had been waiting for this moment ever since the popular insurrections of 1848, and now that it finally seemed to have come, he did not want events to catch him unprepared. He therefore decided to resume his economic studies and to give them a finished form.
This period was one of the most prolific in his life: he managed to write more in a few months than in the preceding years. In December 1857, he wrote to Engels: ‘I am working like mad all night and every night collating my economic studies, so that I might at least get the outlines Grundrisse clear before the deluge’ (Marx to Engels, 8 December 1857, Marx and Engels 1983: 257).2
Marx’s work was now remarkable and wide-ranging. From August 1857 to May 1858, he filled the eight notebooks known as the Grundrisse, while as correspondent of the New-York Tribune (the paper with the largest circulation in the United States of America, with whom he had collaborated since 1851), he wrote dozens of articles on, among other things, the development of the crisis in Europe. Lastly, from October 1857 to February 1858, he compiled three books of extracts, called the Crisis Notebooks (Marx 2017). Thanks to these, it is possible to change the conventional image of a Marx studying Hegel’s Science of Logic to find inspiration for the manuscripts of 1857-58. For at that time he was much more preoccupied with events linked to the long-predicted major crisis. Unlike the extracts he had made before, these were not compendia from the works of economists but consisted of a large quantity of notes, gleaned from various daily newspapers, about major developments in the crisis, stock market trends, trade exchange fluctuations and important bankruptcies in Europe, the United States of America, and other parts of the world. A letter he wrote to Engels in December indicates the intensity of his activity:
I am working enormously, as a rule until 4 o’clock in the morning. I am engaged on a twofold task: 1. Elaborating the outlines of political economy (For the benefit of the public it is absolutely essential to go into the matter to the bottom, as it is for my own, individually, to get rid of this nightmare). 2. The present crisis. Apart from the articles for the [New-York] Tribune, all I do is keep records of it, which, however, takes up a considerable amount of time. I think that, somewhere about the spring, we ought to do a pamphlet together about the affair (Marx to Engels, 18 December 1857, Marx and Engels 1983: 224).3
The Grundrisse were divided in three parts: a methodological ‘Introduction’, a ‘Chapter on Money’, in which Marx dealt with money and value, and a ‘Chapter on Capital’, that was centered on the process of production and circulation of capital, and addressed such key themes as the concept of surplus-value, and the economic formations which preceded the capitalist mode of production. Marx immense effort did not, however, allow him to complete the work. In late February 1858 he wrote to Lassalle:
I have in fact been at work on the final stages for some months. But the thing is proceeding very slowly because no sooner does one set about finally disposing of subjects to which one has devoted years of study than they start revealing new aspects and demand to be thought out further. […] The work I am presently concerned with is a Critique of Economic Categories or, if you like, a critical exposé of the system of the bourgeois economy. It is at once an exposé and, by the same token, a critique of the system. I have very little idea how many sheets the whole thing will amount to. […] Now that I am at last ready to set to work after 15 years of study, I have an uncomfortable feeling that turbulent movements from without will probably interfere after all (Marx to Lassalle, 22 February 1858, Marx and Engels 1983: 270-1).
There was no sign of the much-anticipated revolutionary movement, which was supposed to be born in conjunction with the crisis and Marx abandoned the project to write a volume on the current crisis. Nevertheless, he could not finish the work, on which he had been struggling for many years, because he was aware that he was still far away from a definitive conceptualization of the themes addressed in the manuscript. Therefore, the Grundrisse remained only a draft, from which – after he had carefully worked up the ‘Chapter on Money’ –, in 1859, he published a short book with no public resonance: A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy.
In August 1861, Marx again devoted himself to the critique of political economy, working with such intensity that by June 1863 he had filled 23 sizeable notebooks on the transformation of money into capital, on commercial capital, and above all on the various theories with which economists had tried to explain surplus value.4 His aim was to complete A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, which was intended as the first instalment of his planned work. The book published in 1859 contained a brief first chapter, ‘The Commodity’, differentiated between use value and exchange value, and a longer second chapter, ‘Money, or Simple Circulation’, dealt with theories of money as unit of measure. In the preface, Marx stated: ‘I examine the system of bourgeois economy in the following order: capital, landed property, wage-labour; the state, foreign trade, world market’ (Marx 1987a: 261).
Two years later, Marx’s plans had not changed: he was still intending to write six books, each devoted to one of the themes he had listed in 1859.5 However, from Summer 1861 to March 1862, he worked on a new chapter, ‘Capital in General’, which he intended to become the third chapter in his publication plan. In the preparatory manuscript contained in the first five of the 23 notebooks he compiled by the end of 1863, he focused on the process of production of capital and, more particularly, on: 1) the transformation of money into capital; 2) absolute surplus value; and 3) relative surplus value.6 Some of these themes, already addressed in the Grundrisse, were now set forth with greater analytic richness and precision.
A momentary alleviation of the huge economic problems that had beset him for years allowed Marx to spend more time on his studies and to make significant theoretical advances. In late October 1861 he wrote to Engels that ‘circumstances ha[d] finally cleared to the extent that [he had] at least got firm ground under [his] feet again’. His work for the New-York Tribune assured him of ‘two pounds a week’ (Marx to Engels, 30 October 1861, Marx and Engels 1985: 323). He had also concluded an agreement with Die Presse. Over the past year, he had ‘pawned everything that was not actually nailed down’, and their plight had made his wife seriously depressed. But now the ‘twofold engagement’ promised to ‘put an end to the harried existence led by [his] family’ and to allow him to ‘complete his book’. Nevertheless, by December, he told Engels that he had been forced to leave IOUs with the butcher and grocer, and that his debt to assorted creditors amounted to one hundred pounds (Marx to Engels, 9 December 1861, Marx and Engels 1985: 332). Because of these worries, his research was proceeding slowly: ‘Circumstances being what they were, there was, indeed, little possibility of bringing [the] theoretical matters to a rapid close’. But he gave notice to Engels that ‘the thing is assuming a much more popular form, and method is much less in evidence than in Part I’ (Marx to Engels, 9 December 1861, Marx and Engels 1985: 333). Against this dramatic background, Marx tried to borrow money from his mother, as well as from other relatives and the poet Carl Siebel [1836 – 1868]. In a letter to Engels later in December, he explained that these were attempts to avoid constantly ‘pestering’ him. At any event, they were all unproductive. Nor was the agreement with Die Presse working out, as they were only printing (and paying for) half the articles he submitted to them. To his friend’s best wishes for the new year, he confided that if it turned out to be ‘anything like the old one’ he would ‘sooner consign it to the devil’ (Marx to Engels, 27 December 1861, Marx and Engels 1985: 337-8). Things took a further turn for the worse when the New-York Tribune, faced with financial constraints associated with the American Civil War, had to cut down on the number of its foreign correspondents. Marx’s last article for the paper appeared on 10 March 1862. From then on, he had to do without what had been his main source of income since the summer of 1851. That same month, the landlord of his house threatened to take action to recover rent arrears, in which case – as he put it to Engels – he would be ‘sued by all and sundry’ (Marx to Engels, 3 March 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 344). And he added shortly after: ‘I’m not getting on very well with my book, since work is often checked, i.e. suspended, for weeks on end by domestic disturbances’ (Marx to Engels, 15 March 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 352). During this period, Marx launched into a new area of research: Theories of Surplus Value.7 This was planned to be the fifth8 and final part of the long third chapter on ‘Capital in General’. Over ten notebooks, Marx minutely dissected how the major economists had dealt with the question of surplus value; his basic idea was that ‘all economists share the error of examining surplus-value not as such, in its pure form, but in the particular forms of profit and rent’ (Marx 1988: 348).9
In Notebook VI, Marx began with a critique of the Physiocrats. First of all, he recognized them as the ‘true fathers of modern political economy’(Marx 1988: 352), since it was they who ‘laid the foundation for the analysis of capitalist production’ (Marx 1988: 354) and sought the origin of surplus value not in ‘the sphere of circulation’ – in the productivity of money, as the mercantilists thought – but in ‘the sphere of production’. They understood the ‘fundamental principle that only that labour is productive which creates a surplus value’ (Marx 1988: 354). On the other hand, being wrongly convinced that ‘agricultural labour’ was ‘the only productive labour’, they conceived of ‘rent’ as ‘the only form of surplus value’ (Marx 1988: 355). They limited their analysis to the idea that the productivity of the land enabled man to produce ‘no more than sufficed to keep him alive’. According to this theory, then, surplus value appeared as ‘a gift of nature’ (Marx 1988: 357). In the second half of Notebook VI, and in most of Notebooks VII, VIII and IX, Marx concentrated on Adam Smith. He did not share the false idea of the Physiocrats that ‘only one definite kind of concrete labour – agricultural labour – creates surplus value’ (Marx 1988: 391). Indeed, in Marx’s eyes one of Smith’s greatest merits was to have understood that, in the distinctive labour process of bourgeois society, the capitalist ‘appropriates for nothing, appropriates without paying for it, a part of the living labour’ (Marx 1988: 388); or again, that ‘more labour is exchanged for less labour (from the labourer’s standpoint), less labour is exchanged for more labour (from the capitalist’s standpoint)’ (Marx 1988: 393). Smith’s limitation, however, was his failure to differentiate ‘surplus-value as such’ from ‘the specific forms it assumes in profit and rent’ (Marx 1988: 389). He calculated surplus-value not in relation to the part of capital from which it arises, but as ‘an overplus over the total value of the capital advanced’ (Marx 1988: 396), including the part that the capitalist expends to purchase raw materials.
Marx put many of these thoughts in writing during a three-week stay with Engels in Manchester in April 1862. On his return, he reported to Lassalle:
As for my book, it won’t be finished for another two months. During the past year, to keep myself from starving, I have had to do the most despicable hackwork and have often gone for months without being able to add a line to the ‘thing’. And there is also that quirk I have of finding fault with anything I have written and not looked at for a month, so that I have to revise it completely (Marx to Lassalle, 28 April 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 356).
Marx doggedly resumed work and until early June extended his research to other economists such as Germain Garnier [1754 – 1821] and Charles Ganilh [1758 – 1836]. Then he went more deeply into the question of productive and unproductive labour, again focusing particularly on Smith, who, despite a lack of clarity in some respects, had drawn the distinction between the two concepts. From the capitalist’s viewpoint, productive labour
is wage labour which, exchanged against the […] part of the capital that is spent on wages, reproduces not only this part of the capital (or the value of its own labour capacity), but in addition produces surplus value for the capitalist. It is only thereby that commodity or money is transformed into capital, is produced as capital. Only that wage labour is productive which produces capital (Marx 1989a: 8).
Unproductive labour, on the other hand, is ‘labour which is not exchanged with capital, but directly with revenue, that is, with wages or profit’ (Marx 1989a: 12). According to Smith, the activity of sovereigns – and of the legal and military officers surrounding them – produced no value and in this respect was comparable to the duties of domestic servants. This, Marx pointed out, was the language of a ‘still revolutionary bourgeoisie’, which had not yet ‘subjected to itself the whole of society, the state, etc.’
illustrious and time-honoured occupations – sovereign, judge, officer, priest, etc. – with all the old ideological castes to which they give rise, their men of letters, their teachers and priests, are from an economic standpoint put on the same level as the swarm of their own lackeys and jesters maintained by the bourgeoisie and by idle wealth – the landed nobility and idle capitalists (Marx 1989a: 197).
In Notebook X, Marx turned to a rigorous analysis of François Quesnay’s [1694 – 1774] Tableau économique (Marx to Engels, 18 June 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 381).10 He praised it to the skies, describing it as ‘an extremely brilliant conception, incontestably the most brilliant for which political economy had up to then been responsible’ (Marx 1989a: 240).
Meanwhile, Marx’s economic circumstances continued to be desperate. In mid-June, he wrote to Engels: ‘Every day my wife says she wishes she and the children were safely in their graves, and I really cannot blame her, for the humiliations, torments and alarums that one has to go through in such a situation are indeed indescribable’. Already in April, the family had had to re-pawn all the possessions it had only recently reclaimed from the loan office. The situation was so extreme that Jenny made up her mind to sell some books from her husband’s personal library – although she could not find anyone who wanted to buy them.
Nevertheless, Marx managed to ‘work hard’ and in mid-June expressed a note of satisfaction to Engels: ‘strange to say, my grey matter is functioning better in the midst of the surrounding poverty than it has done for years’ (Marx to Engels, 18 June 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 380). Continuing his research, he compiled Notebooks XI, XII and XIII in the course of the summer; they focused on the theory of rent, which he had decided to include as ‘an extra chapter’ (Marx to Engels, 2 August 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 394) in the text he was preparing for publication. Marx critically examined the ideas of Johann Rodbertus [1805 – 1875], then moved on to an extensive analysis of the doctrines of David Ricardo [1772 – 1823].11 Denying the existence of absolute rent, Ricardo had allowed a place only for differential rent related to the fertility and location of the land. In this theory, rent was an excess: it could not have been anything more, because that would have contradicted his ‘concept of value being equal to a certain quantity of labour time’ (Marx 1989a: 359); he would have had to admit that the agricultural product was constantly sold above its cost price, which he calculated as the sum of the capital advanced and the average profit (Cf. Marx to Engels, 2 August 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 396). Marx’s conception of absolute rent, by contrast, stipulated that ‘under certain historical circumstances […] landed property does indeed put up the prices of raw materials’ (Marx to Engels, 2 August 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 398).
In the same letter to Engels, Marx wrote that it was ‘a real miracle’ that he ‘had been able to get on with [his] theoretical writing to such an extent’ (Marx to Engels, 2 August 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 394). His landlord had again threatened to send in the bailiffs, while tradesmen to whom he was in debt spoke of withholding provisions and taking legal action against him. Once more he had to turn to Engels for help, confiding that had it not been for his wife and children he would ‘far rather move into a model lodging house than be constantly squeezing [his] purse’ (Marx to Engels, 7 August 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 399).
In September, Marx wrote to Engels that he might get a job ‘in a railroad office’ in the new year (Marx to Engels, 10 September 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 417). In December, he repeated to Ludwig Kugelmann [1828 – 1902] that things had become so desperate that he had ‘decided to become a “practical man”’; nothing came of the idea, however. Marx reported with his typical sarcasm: ‘Luckily – or perhaps I should say unluckily? – I did not get the post because of my bad handwriting’ (Marx to Kugelmann, 28 December 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 436). Meanwhile, in early November, he had confided to Ferdinand Lassalle [1825 – 1864] that he had been forced to suspend work ‘for some six weeks’ but that it was ‘going ahead […] with interruptions’. ‘However,’ he added, ‘it will assuredly be brought to a conclusion by and by’ (Marx to Lassalle, 7 November 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 426).
During this span of time, Marx filled another two notebooks, XIV and XV, with extensive critical analysis of various economic theorists. He noted that Thomas Robert Malthus [1766 – 1834], for whom surplus value stemmed ‘from the fact that the seller sells the commodity above its value’, represented a return to the past in economic theory, since he derived profit from the exchange of commodities (Marx 1989b: 215). Marx accused James Mill [1773 -1836] of misunderstanding the categories of surplus value and profit; highlighted the confusion produced by Samuel Bailey [1791 – 1870] in failing to distinguish between the immanent measure of value and the value of the commodity; and argued that John Stuart Mill [1806 – 1873] did not realize that ‘the rate of surplus value and the rate of profit’ were two different quantities (Marx 1989b: 373), the latter being determined not only by the level of wages but also by other causes not directly attributable to it.
Marx also paid special attention to various economists opposed to Ricardian theory, such as the socialist Thomas Hodgskin [1787 – 1869]. Finally, he dealt with the anonymous text Revenue and Its Sources – in his view, a perfect example of ‘vulgar economics’, which translated into ‘doctrinaire’ but ‘apologetic’ language the ‘standpoint of the ruling section, i.e. the capitalists’ (Marx 1989b: 450). With the study of this book, Marx concluded his analysis of the theories of surplus value put forward by the leading economists of the past and began to examine commercial capital, or the capital that did not create but distributed surplus value.12 Its polemic against ‘interest-bearing capital’ might ‘parade as socialism’, but Marx had no time for such ‘reforming zeal’ that did not ‘touch upon real capitalist production’ but ‘merely attacked one of its consequences’. For Marx, on the contrary:
The complete objectification, inversion and derangement of capital as interest-bearing capital – in which, however, the inner nature of capitalist production, [its] derangement, merely appears in its most palpable form – is capital which yields ‘compound interest’. It appears as a Moloch demanding the whole world as a sacrifice belonging to it of right, whose legitimate demands, arising from its very nature, are however never met and are always frustrated by a mysterious fate (Marx 1989b: 453).
Marx continued in the same vein:
Thus it is interest, not profit, which appears to be the creation of value arising from capital as such [… and] consequently it is regarded as the specific revenue created by capital. This is also the form in which it is conceived by the vulgar economists. […] All intermediate links are obliterated, and the fetishistic face of capital, as also the concept of the capital-fetish, is complete. This form arises necessarily, because the juridical aspect of property is separated from its economic aspect and one part of the profit under the name of interest accrues to capital in itself which is completely separated from the production process, or to the owner of this capital To the vulgar economist who desires to represent capital as an independent source of value, a source which creates value, this form is of course a godsend, a form in which the source of profit is no longer recognisable and the result of the capitalist process – separated from the process itself – acquires an independent existence. In M-C-M’ an intermediate link is still retained. In M-M’ we have the incomprehensible form of capital, the most extreme inversion and materialisation of production relations (Marx 1989b: 458).
Following the studies of commercial capital, Marx moved on to what may be thought of as a third phase of the economic manuscripts of 1861-1863. This began in December 1862, with the section on ‘capital and profit’ in Notebook XVI that Marx identified as the ‘third chapter’(Marx 1976a: 1598-675). Here Marx drew an outline of the distinction between surplus value and profit. In Notebook XVII, also compiled in December, he returned to the question of commercial capital (following the reflections in Notebook XV, Marx 1976a: 1682-773) and to the reflux of money in capitalist reproduction. At the end of the year, Marx gave a progress report to Kugelmann, informing him that ‘the second part’, or the ‘continuation of the first instalment’, a manuscript equivalent to ‘about 30 sheets of print’ was ‘now at last finished’. Four years after the first schema, in the Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, Marx now reviewed the structure of his projected work. He told Kugelmann that he had decided on a new title, using Capital for the first time, and that the name he had operated with in 1859 would be ‘merely the subtitle’ (Marx to Kugelmann, 28 December 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 435). Otherwise he was continuing to work in accordance with the original plan. What he intended to write would be ‘the third chapter of the first part, namely Capital in General’.13 The volume in the last stages of preparation would contain ‘what Englishmen call “the principles of political economy”’. Together with what he had already written in the 1859 instalment, it would comprise the ‘quintessence’ of his economic theory. On the basis of the elements he was preparing to make public, he told Kugelmann, a further ‘sequel (with the exception, perhaps, of the relationship between the various forms of state and the various economic structures of society) could easily be pursued by others’.
Marx thought he would be able to produce a ‘fair copy’ (Marx to Kugelmann, 28 December 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 435) of the manuscript in the new year, after which he planned to take it to Germany in person. Then he intended ‘to conclude the presentation of capital, competition and credit’. In the same letter to Kugelmann, he compared the writing styles in the text published in 1859 and in the work he was then preparing: ‘In the first part, the method of presentation was certainly far from popular. This was due partly to the abstract nature of the subject […]. The present part is easier to understand because it deals with more concrete conditions’. To explain the difference, almost by way of justification, he added:
Scientific attempts to revolutionize a science can never be really popular. But, once the scientific foundations are laid, popularization is easy. Again, should times become more turbulent, one might be able to select the colours and nuances demanded by a popular presentation of these particular subjects (Marx to Kugelmann, 28 December 1862, Marx and Engels 1985: 436).
A few days later, at the start of the new year, Marx listed in greater detail the parts that would have comprised his work. In a schema in Notebook XVIII, he indicated that the ‘first section (Abschnitt)’, ‘The Production Process of Capital’, would be divided as follows:
1) Introduction. Commodity. Money. 2) Transformation of money into capital. 3) Absolute surplus value. […] 4) Relative surplus value. […] 5) Combination of absolute and relative surplus value. […] 6) Reconversion of surplus value into capital. Primitive accumulation. Wakefield’s theory of colonization. 7) Result of the production process. […] 8) Theories of surplus value. 9) Theories of productive and unproductive labour (Marx 1989b: 347).
Marx did not confine himself to the first volume but also drafted a schema of what was intended to be the ‘third section’ of his work: ‘Capital and Profit’. This part, already indicating themes that were to comprise Capital, Volume III, was divided as follows:
1) Conversion of surplus value into profit. Rate of profit as distinguished from rate of surplus value. 2) Conversion of profit into average profit. […] 3) Adam Smith’s and Ricardo’s theories on profit and prices of production. 4) Rent. […] 5) History of the so-called Ricardian law of rent. 6) Law of the fall of the rate of profit. 7) Theories of profit. […] 8) Division of profit into industrial profit and interest. […] 9) Revenue and its sources. […] 10) Reflux movements of money in the process of capitalist production as a whole. 11) Vulgar economy. 12) Conclusion. Capital and wage labour (Marx 1991: 346–7).14
In Notebook XVIII, which he composed in January 1863, Marx continued his analysis of mercantile capital. Surveying George Ramsay [1855 – 1935], Antoine-Elisée Cherbuliez [1797 – 1869] and Richard Jones [1790 – 1855], he inserted some additions to the study of how various economists had explained surplus value.
Marx’s financial difficulties persisted during this period and actually grew worse in early 1863. He wrote to Engels that his ‘attempts to raise money in France and Germany [had] come to nought’, that no one would supply him with food on credit, and that ‘the children [had] no clothes or shoes in which to go out’ (Marx to Engels, 8 January 1863, Marx and Engels 1985: 442). Two weeks later, he was on the edge of the abyss. In another letter to Engels, he confided that he had proposed to his life’s companion what now seemed an inevitability:
My two elder children will obtain employment as governesses through the Cunningham family. Lenchen is to enter service elsewhere, and I, along with my wife and little Tussy, shall go and live in the same City Model Lodging-House in which Red Wolff once resided with his family (Marx to Engels, 13 January 1863, Marx and Engels 1985: 445).
At the same time, new health problems had appeared. In the first two weeks of February, Marx was ‘strictly forbidden [from] all reading, writing or smoking’. He suffered from ‘some kind of inflammation of the eye, combined with a most obnoxious affection of the nerves of the head’. He could return to his books only in the middle of the month, when he confessed to Engels that during the long idle days he had been so alarmed that he ‘indulged in all manner of psychological fantasies about what it would feel like to be blind or insane’ (Marx to Engels, 13 February 1863, Marx and Engels 1985: 453). Just over a week later, having recovered from the eye problems, he developed a new liver disorder that was destined to plague him for a long time to come. Since Dr. Allen, his regular doctor, would have imposed a ‘complete course of treatment’ that would have meant breaking off all work, he asked Engels to get Dr. Eduard Gumpert [?] to recommend a simpler ‘household remedy’ (Marx to Engels, 21 February 1863, Marx and Engels 1985: 460).
During this period, apart from brief moments when he studied machinery, he began to ‘attend a practical (purely experimental) course for working men given by Prof. Willis […] (at the Institute of Geology, where [Thomas] Huxley also lectured)’ (Marx to Engels, 28 January 1863, Marx and Engels 1985: 449). Apart from that, however, Marx had to suspend his in-depth economic studies. In March, however, he resolved ‘to make up for lost time by some hard slogging’ (Marx to Engels, 24 March 1863, Marx and Engels 1985: 461). He compiled two notebooks, XX and XXI, that dealt with accumulation, the real and formal subsumption of labour to capital, and the productivity of capital and labour. His arguments were correlated with the main theme of his research at the time: surplus value.
In late May, he wrote to Engels that in the previous weeks he had also been studying the Polish question15 at the British Museum: ‘What I did, on the one hand, was fill in the gaps in my knowledge (diplomatic, historical) of the Russian-Prussian-Polish affair and, on the other, read and make excerpts from all kinds of earlier literature relating to the part of the political economy I had elaborated’ (Marx to Engels, 29 May 1863, Marx and Engels 1985: 474). These working notes, written in May and June, were collected in eight additional notebooks A to H, which contained hundreds of more pages summarizing economic studies of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and covering more than a hundred volumes.16
Marx also informed Engels that, feeling ‘more or less able to work again’, he was determined to ‘cast the weight off his shoulders’ and therefore intended to ‘make a fair copy of the political economy for the printers (and give it a final polish)’. He still suffered from a ‘badly swollen liver’, however (Marx to Engels, 29 May 1863, Marx and Engels 1985: 474), and in mid-June, despite ‘wolfing sulphur’, he was still ‘not quite fit’ (Marx to Engels, 12 June 1863, Marx and Engels 1985: 479). In any case, he returned to the British Museum and in mid-July reported to Engels that he had again been spending ‘ten hours a day working at economics’. These were precisely the days when, in analysing the reconversion of surplus value into capital, he prepared in Notebook XXII a recasting of Quesnay’s Tableau économique (Marx to Engels, 6 July 1863, Marx and Engels 1985: 485). Then he compiled the last notebook in the series begun in 1861 – no. XXIII – which consisted mainly of notes and supplementary remarks.
At the end of these two years of hard work, and following a deeper critical re-examination of the main theorists of political economy, Marx was more determined than ever to complete the major work of his life. Although he had not yet definitively solved many of the conceptual and expository problems, his completion of the historical part now impelled him to return to theoretical questions.

2. The Writing of the Three Volumes of Capital
Marx gritted his teeth and embarked on a new phase of his labours. From Summer 1863, he began the actual composition of what would become his magnum opus.17 Until December 1865, he devoted himself to the most extensive versions of the various subdivisions, preparing drafts in turn of Volume I, the bulk of Volume III (his only account of the complete process of capitalist production) (Marx 2015), and the initial version of Volume II (the first general presentation of the circulation process of capital). In the manuscripts of 1863-65, Marx grappled with new themes after his work of previous years. None of these, however, was tackled in an exhaustive manner.18 As regards the six-volume plan indicated in 1859 in the preface to A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, Marx inserted a number of themes relating to rent and wages that were originally to have been treated in volumes II and III (See Rosdolsky 1977: 27).19 In mid-August 1863, Marx updated Engels on his steps forward:
In one respect, my work (preparing the manuscript for the press) is going well. In the final elaboration the stuff is, I think, assuming a tolerably popular form. […] On the other hand, despite the fact that I write all day long, it’s not getting on as fast as my own impatience, long subjected to a trial of patience, might demand. At all events, it will be 100% more comprehensible than No. l.20
Marx kept up the furious pace throughout the autumn, concentrating on the writing of Volume I. But his health rapidly worsened as a result, and November saw the appearance of what his wife called the ‘terrible disease’ against which he would fight for many years of his life. It was a case of carbuncles,21 a nasty infection that manifested itself in abscesses and serious, debilitating boils on various parts of the body.
Because of one deep ulcer following a major carbuncle, Marx had to have an operation and ‘for quite a time his life was in danger’. According to his wife’s later account, the critical condition lasted for ‘four weeks’ and caused Marx severe and constant pains, together with ‘tormenting worries and all kinds of mental suffering’. For the family’s financial situation kept it ‘on the brink of the abyss’ (Jenny Marx in Enzensberger 1973: 288).
In early December, when he was on the road to recovery, Marx told Engels that he ‘had had one foot in the grave’ (Marx to Engels, 2 December 1863, Marx and Engels 1985: 495) – and two days later, that his physical condition struck him as ‘a good theme for a short story’. From the front, he looked like someone who ‘regale[d] his inner man with port, claret, stout and a truly massive mass of meat’. But ‘behind on his back, the outer man, a damned carbuncle’ (Marx to Engels, 4 December 1863, Marx and Engels 1985: 497). In this context, the death of Marx’s mother obliged him to travel to Germany to sort out the legacy. His condition again deteriorated during the trip.
After he returned to London, all the infections and skin complaints continued to take their toll on Marx’s health into the early spring, and he was able to resume his planned work only towards the middle of April, after an interruption of more than five months. In that time, he continued to concentrate on Volume I, and it seems likely that it was precisely then that he drafted the so-called ‘Chapter Six. Results of the Immediate Process of Production’. In this text, Marx returned several times to a very important concept: ‘commodities appear as the purchasers of persons’. In capitalism, ‘means of production and […] means of subsistence confront labour-power, stripped of all material wealth, as autonomous powers, personified in their owners. The objective conditions essential to the realization of labour are alienated from the worker and become manifest as fetishes endowed with a will and a soul of their own’ (Marx 1976b: 1001).22
During this period, the early death of his friend Wilhelm Wolff, of whom both he and Engels were very fond, was a source of great pain for both. Wolff left a legacy of £800 to Marx, thanks to which he was able to move to a larger detached house at No. 1 Modena Villas.23
Despite this improvement in his finances, the arrival of summer did not change his precarious circumstances. Only after a family break in Ramsgate, in the last week of July and the first ten days of August, did it become possible to press on with his work. He began the new period of writing with Volume III: Part Two, ‘The Conversion of Profit into Average Profit’, then Part One, ‘The Conversion of Surplus Value into Profit’ (which was completed, most probably, between late October and early November 1864). During this period, he assiduously participated in meetings of the International Working Men’s Association (Cf. Musto 2014), for which he wrote the Inaugural Address and the Statutes in October. Also in that month, he wrote to Carl Klings [1828 – ?], a metallurgical worker in Solingen who had been a member of the League of Communists, and told him of his various mishaps and the reason for his unavoidable slowness:
I have been sick throughout the past year (being afflicted with carbuncles and furuncles). Had it not been for that, my work on political economy, Capital, would already have come out. I hope I may now complete it finally in a couple of months and deal the bourgeoisie a theoretical blow from which it will never recover. […] You may count on my remaining ever a loyal champion of the working class (Marx to Klings, 4 October 1864, Marx and Engels 1987: 4).
Having resumed work after a pause for duties to the International, Marx wrote Part Three of Volume III, entitled ‘The Law of the Tendency of the Rate of Profit to Fall’. But his work on this was accompanied with another flare-up of his disease.
From January to May 1865, Marx devoted himself to Volume II. The manuscripts were divided into three chapters, which eventually became Parts in the version that Engels had printed in 1885: 1) The Metamorphoses of Capital; 2) The Turnover of Capital; and 3) Circulation and Reproduction. In these pages, Marx developed new concepts and connected up some of the theories in volumes I and III.
In the new year too, however, the carbuncle did not stop persecuting Marx, and around the middle of February, there was another flare-up of the disease. In addition to the ‘foruncles’, which persisted until the middle of the month, the International took up an ‘enormous amount of time’. Still, he did not stop work on the book, even if it meant that sometimes he ‘didn’t get to bed until four in the morning’ (Marx to Engels, 13 March 1865, Marx and Engels 1987: 129-30).
A final spur for him to complete the missing parts soon was the publisher’s contract. Thanks to the intervention of Wilhelm Strohn [?], an old comrade from the days of the League of Communists, Otto Meisner [1819 – 1902] in Hamburg had sent him a letter on 21 March that included an agreement to publish ‘the work Capital: A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy’. It was to be ‘approximately 50 signatures24 in length [and to] appear in two volumes’ (Marx 1985b: 361). By signing the agreement, Marx undertook ‘to deliver the complete manuscript […] on or before the last day of May of this year’ (Marx 1985b: 362).
Between the last week of May and the end of June, Marx composed a short text Wages, Price and Profit.25 In it, he contested John Weston’s thesis that wage increases were not favourable to the working class, and that trade union demands for higher pay were actually harmful. Marx showed that, on the contrary, ‘a general rise of wages would result in a fall in the general rate of profit, but not affect the average prices of commodities, or their values’ (Marx 1985a: 144).
In the same period, Marx also wrote Part Four of Volume III, entitling it ‘Conversion of Commodity-Capital and Money-Capital into Commercial Capital and Money-Dealing Capital (Merchant’s Capital)’. At the end of July 1865, he gave Engels another progress report:
There are 3 more chapters to be written to complete the theoretical part (the first 3 books). Then there is still the 4th book, the historical-literary one, to be written, which will, comparatively speaking, be the easiest part for me, since all the problems have been resolved in the first 3 books, so that this last one is more by way of repetition in historical form. But I cannot bring myself to send anything off until I have the whole thing in front of me. Whatever shortcomings they may have, the advantage of my writings is that they are an artistic whole, and this can only be achieved through my practice of never having things printed until I have them in front of me in their entirety (Marx to Engels, 31 July 1865, Marx and Engels 1987: 173).
Two years later, Marx’s fascination with art reasserted itself in Capital. He advised Engels to read The Unknown Masterpiece (1831) by Honoré de Balzac, which he described as a little ‘masterpiece’ in its own right, ‘full of the most delightful irony’ (Marx to Engels, 25 February 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 348). The hero of the short story is Master Frenhofer, who, obsessed with the wish to make a painting of his as realistic as possible, delays completing it in the search for perfection. To those who ask what is still lacking, he answers: ‘A trifle that’s nothing at all, yet a nothing that’s everything’ (Balzac 2001: 16). To those who ask him to display the canvas, he stubbornly refuses: ‘No, no, it must still be brought to perfection. Yesterday, toward evening, I thought I was done. Yet I’m still not satisfied – I have doubts’ (Balzac 2001: 22). Eventually Balzac’s masterly creation is driven to exclaim: ‘It’s ten years now … that I’ve been struggling with this problem. But what are ten short years when you’re contending with nature?’ (Balzac 2001: 24). And he adds: ‘For a time I believed my painting was done; but now I’m sure several details are wrong, and I won’t have a moment’s peace till I’ve dispelled my doubts’ (Balzac 2001: 32).
It is likely that Marx, with his usual sharpness of wit, identified with Frenhofer. Looking back, his son-in-law Paul Lafargue [1842-1911] said that a reading of Balzac’s story had ‘made a deep impression him because it partly described feelings that he had himself experienced’. Marx, too, was ‘always extremely conscientious about his work’, he ‘was never satisfied with his work – he was always making some improvements and he always found his rendering inferior to the idea he wished to convey’ (Lafargue in Enzensberger 1973: 307).
When unavoidable slowdowns and a series of negative events forced him to reconsider his working method, Marx asked himself whether it might be more useful first to produce a finished copy of Volume I, so that he could immediately publish it, or rather to finish writing all the volumes that would comprise the work. In another letter to Engels, he said that the ‘point in question’ was whether he should ‘do a fair copy of part of the manuscript and send it to the publisher, or finish writing the whole thing first’. He preferred the latter solution, but reassured his friend that his work on the other volumes would not have been wasted:
[Under the circumstances], progress with it has been as fast as anyone could have managed, even having no artistic considerations at all. Besides, as I have a maximum limit of 60 printed sheets,26 it is absolutely essential for me to have the whole thing in front of me, to know how much has to be condensed and crossed out, so that the individual sections shall be evenly balanced and in proportion within the prescribed limits (Marx to Engels, 5 August 1865, Marx and Engels 1987: 175).
Marx confirmed that he would ‘spare no effort to complete as soon as possible’; the thing was a ‘nightmarish burden’ to him. It prevented him ‘from doing anything else’ and he was keen to get it out of the way before a new political upheaval: ‘I know that time will not stand still for ever just as it is now’ (Marx to Engels, 5 August 1865, Marx and Engels 1987: 175).
Although he had decided to bring forward the completion of Volume I, Marx did not want to leave what he had done on Volume III up in the air. Between July and December1865, he composed, albeit in fragmentary form, Part Five (‘Division of Profit into Interest and Profit of Enterprise. Interest-Bearing Capital’), Part Six (‘Transformation of Surplus-Profit into Ground-Rent’) and Part Seven (‘Revenues and Their Sources’).27 The structure that Marx gave to Volume III between Summer 1864 and the end of 1865 was therefore very similar to the 12-point schema of January 1863 contained in Notebook XVIII of the manuscripts on theories of surplus value.
In parallel with this work, in the second half of November 1865, Marx asked Engels to obtain from his acquaintance Alfred Knowles, a Manchester manufacturer, some information about the cotton industry, without which he would be unable ‘to write out the second chapter’ (Marx to Engels, 20 November 1865, Marx and Engels 1987: 199) of Capital, Volume I.28
The financial relief that allowed him to concentrate fruitfully on his work did not last long, and within a year the economic problems were back. In late July 1865, Marx confessed to Engels that he felt extremely uncomfortable about his plight and that he ‘would rather have had [his] thumb cut off than’ to be writing to him about it. The situation was indeed dramatic: ‘For two months I have been living solely on the pawnshop, which means that a queue of creditors has been hammering on my door, becoming more and more unendurable every day’. Thinking back to what had led to this state, he recalled that he had ‘been unable to earn a farthing and that ‘merely paying off the debts and furnishing the house [had] cost [him] something like £500’ (Marx to Engels, 31 July 1865, Marx and Engels 1987: 172).
On top of this, his duties for first conference of the International in London were particularly intense in September.  To keep at least a modicum of time for the writing of Capital, Marx ending up telling a few white lies. To comrades in the International, he said he was about to leave on a trip, when in fact he was planning complete isolation so that he could work as much as possible without interruptions. However, he came down with a bad ‘flu that only allowed him to write intermittently’ (Marx to Engels, 19 August 1865, Marx and Engels 1987: 172). When the ‘fellows and friends of the “International” discovered after all that [he was] not away’, they sent ‘a summons to attend a meeting of the Sub-committee’ of the General Council to which he belonged. Marx complained to Engels that all this had prevented him from writing, and in addition the ‘four weeks of [his]disappearance’ had been ‘spoiled by the doctor’s prescriptions’ (Marx to Engels, 22 August 1865, Marx and Engels 1987: 188).

3. The Completion of Capital Volume I
At the beginning of 1866, Marx launched into the new draft of Capital, Volume I. In mid-January, he updated Wilhelm Liebknecht [1826 – 1900] on the situation: ‘Indisposition, […] all manner of unfortunate mischances, demands made on me by the International Association etc., have confiscated every free moment I have for writing out the fair copy of my manuscript’. Nevertheless, he thought he was near the end and that he would ‘be able to take Volume 1 of it to the publisher for printing in March’. He added that its ‘two volumes’ would ‘appear simultaneously’ (Marx to Liebknecht, 15 January 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 219). In another letter, sent the same day to Kugelmann, he spoke of being ‘busy 12 hours a day writing out the fair copy’ (Marx to Kugelmann, 15 January 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 221), but hoped to take it to the publisher in Hamburg within two months. Marx was referring here only to Volume I, on the process of production of capital.
Contrary to his predictions, however, the whole year would pass in a struggle with the carbuncles and his worsening state of health. Despite everything, Marx’s thoughts were still directed mainly at the task ahead of him:
What was most loathsome to me was the interruption in my work, which had been going splendidly since January 1st, when I got over my liver complaint. There was no question of ‘sitting’, of course, […]. I was able to forge ahead even if only for short periods of the day. I could make no progress with the really theoretical part. My brain was not up to that. I therefore elaborated the section on the ‘Working-Day’ from the historical point of view, which was not part of my original plan (Marx to Engels, 10 February 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 223-4).
Marx concluded the letter with a phrase that well summed up this period of his life: ‘My book requires all my writing time’ (Marx to Engels, 10 February 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 224). How much the more was this true in 1866.
The situation was now seriously alarming Engels. Fearing the worst, he intervened firmly to persuade Marx that he could no longer go on in the same way:
You really must at last do something sensible now to shake off this carbuncle nonsense, even if the book is delayed by another 3 months. The thing is really becoming far too serious, and if, as you say yourself, your brain is not up to the mark for the theoretical part, then do give it a bit of a rest from the more elevated theory. Give over working at night for a while and lead a rather more regular life (Engels to Marx, 10 February 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 225-6).
Engels immediately consulted Dr. Gumpert, who advised another course of arsenic, but he also made some suggestions about the completion of his book. He wanted to be sure that Marx had given up the far from realistic idea of writing the whole of Capital before any part of it was published. ‘Can you not so arrange things,’ he asked, ‘that the first volume at least is sent for printing first and the second one a few months later?’ (Engels to Marx, 10 February 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 226). Taking everything into account, he ended with a wise observation: ‘What would be gained in these circumstances by having perhaps a few chapters at the end of your book completed, and not even the first volume can be printed, if events take us by surprise?’ (Engels to Marx, 13 February 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 227).
Marx replied to each of Engels’s points, alternating between serious and facetious tones. With regard to arsenic, he wrote: ‘Tell or write to Gumpert to send me the prescription with instructions for use. As I have confidence in him, he owes it to the best of “Political Economy” if nothing else to ignore professional etiquette and treat me from Manchester’ (Marx to Engels, 13 February 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 227). As for his work plans, he wrote:
As far as this ‘damned’ book is concerned, the position now is: it was ready at the end of December.29 The treatise on ground rent alone, the penultimate chapter, is in its present form almost long enough to be a book in itself.30 I have been going to the Museum in the day-time and writing at night. I had to plough through the new agricultural chemistry in Germany, in particular Liebig and Schönbein, which is more important for this matter than all the economists put together, as well as the enormous amount of material that the French have produced since I last dealt with this point. I concluded my theoretical investigation of ground rent 2 years ago. And a great deal had been achieved, especially in the period since then, fully confirming my theory incidentally. And the opening up of Japan (by and large I normally never read travel-books if I am not professionally obliged to). So here was the ‘shifting system’ as it was applied by those curs of English manufacturers to one and the same persons in 1848-50, being applied by me to myself (Marx to Engels, 13 February 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 227).31
Daytime study at the library, to keep abreast of the latest discoveries, and night-time work on his manuscript: this was the punishing routine to which Marx subjected himself in an effort to use all his energies for the completion of the book. On the main task, he wrote to Engels: ‘Although ready, the manuscript, which in its present form is gigantic, is not fit for publishing for anyone but myself, not even for you’ (Marx to Engels, 13 February 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 227). He then gave some idea of the preceding weeks:
I began the business of copying out and polishing the style on the dot of January first, and it all went ahead swimmingly, as I naturally enjoy licking the infant clean after long birth-pangs. But then the carbuncle intervened again, so that I have since been unable to make any more progress but only to fill out with more facts those sections which were, according to the plan, already finished (Marx to Engels, 13 February 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 227).
In the end, he accepted Engels’s advice to spread out the publication schedule: ‘I agree with you and shall get the first volume to Meissner as soon as it is ready’. ‘But,’ he added, ‘in order to complete it, I must first be able to sit’ (Marx to Engels, 13 February 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 227).
In fact, Marx’s health was continuing to deteriorate. Finally, Marx let himself be persuaded to take a break from work. On 15 March he travelled to Margate, a seaside resort in Kent, and on the tenth day sent back a report about himself: ‘I am reading nothing, am writing nothing. The mere fact of having to take the arsenic three times a day obliges one to arrange one’s time for meals and for strolling. […] As regards company here, it does not exist, of course. I can sing with the Miller of the Dee:32 ‘I care for nobody and nobody cares for me’ (Marx to Engels, 24 March 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 249).
Early in April, Marx told his friend Kugelmann that he was ‘much recovered’. But he complained that, because of the interruption, ‘another two months and more’ had been entirely lost, and the completion of his book ‘put back once more’ (Marx to Kugelmann, 6 April 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 262). After his return to London, he remained at a standstill for another few weeks because of an attack of rheumatism and other troubles; his body was still exhausted and vulnerable. Although he reported to Engels in early June that ‘there has fortunately been no recurrence of anything carbuncular’ (Marx to Engels, 7 June 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 281), he was unhappy that his work had ‘been progressing poorly owing to purely physical factors’ (Marx to Engels, 9 June 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 282).
In July, Marx had to confront what had become his three habitual enemies: Livy’s periculum in mora (danger in delay) in the shape of rent arrears; the carbuncles, with a new one ready to flare up; and an ailing liver. In August, he reassured Engels that, although his health ‘fluctuate[d] from one day to the next’, he felt generally better: after all, ‘the feeling of being fit to work again does much for a man’ (Marx to Engels, 7 August 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 303). He was ‘threatened with new carbuncles here and there’, and although they ‘kept disappearing’ without the need for urgent intervention they had obliged him to keep his ‘hours of work very much within limits’ (Marx to Engels, 23 August 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 311). On the same day, he wrote to Kugelmann: ‘I do not think I shall be able to deliver the manuscript of the first volume (it has now grown to 3 volumes) to Hamburg before October. I can only work productively for a very few hours per day without immediately feeling the effects physically’.
This time too, Marx was being excessively optimistic. The steady stream of negative phenomena to which he was daily exposed in the struggle to survive once more proved an obstacle to the completion of his text. Furthermore, he had to spend precious time looking for ways to extract small sums of money from the pawnshop and to escape the tortuous circle of promissory notes in which he had landed. He also said that ‘for [his] family’s sake’ he ‘must, however unwillingly, […] observe the hygienic’ limitations (linked to the prevention of new carbuncles) until he was ‘fully recovered’ Marx to Kugelmann, 23 August 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 312).
Marx’s old friend and former member of the League of Communists, Friedrich Lessner, recalled that he ‘often used to speak of the length of the working day’. At the end of the General Council meetings (which ‘he never missed’), Marx more than once said: ‘We are striving for an eight-hour day, but we ourselves often work twice as long in the space of twenty-four hours’. According to Lessner, Marx did ‘much too much’; ‘an outsider has no idea how much energy and time his work for the International cost him’. Besides ‘Marx had to slave away to keep his family and to spend hours in the British Museum collecting material for his historical and economic studies’ (Lessner in Enzensberger 1973: 293).
Very often, Marx’s permanent intellectual curiosity led him to widen his range of studies. For example, despite the pressure to finish his book as well as his political responsibilities, he wrote to Engels in the summer of 1865 that he was ‘studying Comte on the side just now, as the English and French are making such a fuss of the fellow’. He remained firm in what he thought of Comte’s limitations:  what attracted him was ‘his encyclopaedic quality, la synthèse’, although ‘Hegel [was] infinitely superior as a whole’. ‘And this shitty positivism came out in 1832!’ he ended (Marx to Engels, 7 July 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 292).
His prediction to Kugelmann that he might be able to take the manuscript to Hamburg in October also proved to be overoptimistic. In August, Marx wrote to Kugelmann that ‘accumulated debts’ had become ‘a crushing mental burden’ and that he had even been thinking of moving to the United States. He was soldiering on, though, convinced that he had ‘a duty to […] remain in Europe and complete the work on which [he had] been engaged for so many years’ (Marx to Kugelmann, 23 August 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 312). With regard to Capital, he assured his friend that, although he was spending much time writing documents in preparation for the Geneva congress of the International, he would not be attending it himself. ‘For the working class,’ he wrote, ‘what [he was] doing through this work [was] far more important […] than anything [he] might be able to do personally at any congress’ (Marx to Kugelmann, 23 August 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 312).
Writing to Kugelmann in mid-October, Marx expressed a fear that as a result of his long illness, and all the expenses it had entailed, he could no longer ‘keep the creditors at bay’ and the house was ‘about to come crashing down about [his] ears’ (Marx to Kugelmann, 13 October 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 328). Not even in October, therefore, was it possible for him to put the finishing touches to the manuscript. In describing the state of things to his friend in Hannover, and explaining the reasons for the delay, Marx set out the plan he now had in mind:
My circumstances (endless interruptions, both physical and social) oblige me to publish Volume I first, not both volumes together, as I had originally intended. And there will now probably be 3 volumes. The whole work is thus divided into the following parts:
Book I. The Process of Production of Capital.
Book II. The Process of Circulation of Capital.
Book III. Structure of the Process as a Whole.
Book IV. On the History of the Theory.
The first volume will include the first 2 books. The 3rd book will, I believe, fill the second volume, the 4th the 3rd (Marx to Kugelmann, 13 October 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 328).
Reviewing the work, he had done since the Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, which was published in 1859, Marx continued:
It was, in my opinion, necessary to begin again from the beginning in the first book, i.e., to summarize the book of mine published by Duncker in one chapter on commodities and money. I judged this to be necessary, not merely for the sake of completeness, but because even intelligent people did not properly understand the question, in other words, there must have been defects in the first presentation, especially in the analysis of commodities (Marx to Kugelmann, 13 October 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 328-9).
Extreme poverty marked the month of November, too. But Marx was keen to point out that ‘this summer and autumn it was really not the theory which caused the delay, but [his] physical and civil condition’. If he had been in good health, he would have been able to complete the work. He reminded Engels that it was three years since ‘the first carbuncle had been lanced’ – years in which he had had ‘only short periods’ of relief from it (Marx to Engels, 10 November 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 332). Moreover, having been forced to expend so much time and energy on the daily struggle with poverty, he remarked in December: ‘I only regret that private persons cannot file their bills for the bankruptcy court with the same propriety as men of business’ (Marx to Engels, 8 December 1866, Marx and Engels 1987: 336).
At the end of February 1867, Marx was finally able to give Engels the long-awaited news that the book was finished. Now he had to take it to Germany, and once again he was forced to turn to his friend so that he could redeem his ‘clothes and timepiece from their abode at the pawnbroker’s’ (Marx to Engels, 2 April 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 351);33 otherwise he would not have been able to leave.
Having arrived in Hamburg, Marx discussed with Engels the new plan proposed by Meissner:
He now wants that the book should appear in 3 volumes. In particular he is opposed to my compressing the final book (the historico-literary part) as I had intended. He said that from the publishing point of view […] this was the part by which he was setting most store. I told him that as far as that was concerned, I was his to command (Marx to Engels, 13 April 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 357).
Despite Marx’s optimism, it should be noted that between 1862 and 1863 he had written only the history of the category of surplus-value – and that he had done this before making significant theoretical progress. A few days later, he gave a similar report to Becker:
The whole work will appear in 3 volumes. The title is Capital. A Critique of Political Economy. The first volume comprises the First Book: ‘The Process of Production of Capital’. It is without question the most terrible missile that has yet been hurled at the heads of the bourgeoisie (landowners included)’ (Marx to Becker, 17 April 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 358).
After a few days in Hamburg, Marx travelled on to Hannover. He stayed there as the guest of Kugelmann, who finally got to know him after years of purely epistolary relations. Marx remained available there in case Meissner wanted him to help out with the proof-reading.
Marx stayed in Hanover until the middle of May. Happy with the results of the trip, he described his weeks with the Kugelmann family as ‘an oasis in the desert of his life’ (Kugelmann, in Enzensberger 1973: 323).34 The most particularized accounts of Marx during this period have come down to us through the later recollections of Kugelmann’s daughter, Franziska. She described her fears before the arrival of the unknown guest, of her mother’s concern that he would be a man lost in ‘his political ideas’, with the manner of a ‘gloomy revolutionary’. But both she and her mother had to think again as soon as they met Marx in person; he turned out to be a ‘lively gentleman’ and displayed a ‘youthful freshness in his movements and conversation’ (Kugelmann in Enzensberger 1973: 314). In fact, he was ‘a thoroughly likeable and unpretentious presence, not only in get-togethers at home but also in the circle of my parents’ acquaintances’. Franziska also recalled that Marx ‘showed a lively interest in everything, and when someone pleased him in particular, or made an original remark, he would insert his monocle and look at the person with a cheerful and attentive expression’. The hospitality he received was returned with numerous anecdotes. On Hegel, he recounted how he had once said that ‘none of his students had understood him, except [Karl] Rosenkranz – and that he had understood him badly’ (Kugelmann in Enzensberger 1973: 315). Marx also often quoted Friedrich Schiller and once jokingly adapted a famous quotation of his from Wallenstein’s Camp: ‘He who has seen the best of his time has enough for all times!’ (Kugelmann in Enzensberger 1973: 320).
In discussions on the struggle against capitalism, however, Marx spoke in authoritative tones and did not avoid polemic. To one man’s question about who would polish boots in the future society, he replied: ‘You should do it!’ And someone who asked when communism would begin was told ‘the time will come, but we’ll have to be gone by then’ (Kugelmann in Enzensberger 1973: 319).
From Hanover, Marx wrote to other comrades about the forthcoming publication of his work. To Sigfrid Meyer [1840 – 1872], a German socialist member of the International active in organizing the workers’ movement in New York, he wrote: ‘Volume I comprises the Process of Production of Capital. […] Volume II contains the continuation and conclusion of the theory, Volume III the history of political economy from the middle of the 17th century’ (Marx to Meyer, 30 April 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 367). His schema was unchanged, however, and the idea was still that the second and third volumes would appear together.
Buoyed up with enthusiasm, Marx wrote to Engels in early May that the publisher Meissner was ‘demanding the 2nd volume by the end of the autumn at the latest’. That should have included both Volume II and Volume III, so Marx thought he would have to ‘get his nose to the grindstone’ again, especially as – in the time since he had composed Volume III – ‘a lot of new material relating to the chapters on credit and landed property ha[d] become available’. In the end, he expected to finish the third volume ‘during the winter, so that [he would] have shaken off the whole opus by next spring’. Marx’s overoptimistic predictions were based on the hope that ‘the business of writing’ would be ‘quite different once the proofs for what ha[d] already been done’ started to come in and he felt ‘under pressure from the publisher’ (Engels to Marx, 16 June 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 382).
In mid-June, Engels became involved in the correction of the text for publication. He thought that, compared with the 1859 A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, ‘the dialectic of the argument ha[d] been greatly sharpened’ (Engels to Marx, 16 June 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 381). Marx was heartened by this approval: ‘That you have been satisfied with it so far is more important to me than anything the rest of the world may say of it’ (Marx to Engels, 22 June 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 383). However, Engels noted that his exposition of the form of value was excessively abstract and insufficiently clear for the average reader; he also regretted that precisely this important section had ‘the marks of the carbuncles rather firmly stamped upon it’ (Engels to Marx, 16 June 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 380). A further problem was Marx’s rather dysfunctional subdivision of the volume.  Its eight hundred pages were structured in just six long chapters, each with very few paragraph breaks. Engels therefore wrote: ‘It was a serious mistake not to have made the development of these rather abstract arguments clearer by means of a larger number of short sections with their own headings. You ought to have treated this part in the manner of Hegel’s Encyclopaedia, with short paragraphs, each dialectical transition emphasized by means of a special heading’. Then, ‘a very large class of readers would have found it considerably easier to understand’ (Engels to Marx, 16 June 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 382). In reply, Marx fulminated against the cause of his physical torments – ‘I hope the bourgeoisie will remember my carbuncles until their dying day’ (Marx to Engels, 22 June 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 383) – and convinced himself of the need for an appendix presenting his conception of the form of value in a more popular form. This twenty-page addition was completed by the end of June.
The proof corrections were finished on 16 August 1867, at two in the morning. A few minutes later, he wrote to his friend in Manchester: ‘Dear Fred: Have just finished correcting the last sheet […]. So, this volume is finished. I owe it to you alone that it was possible! […] I embrace you, full of thanks’ (Marx to Engels, 24 August 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 405). A few days later, in another letter to Engels, he summarized what he regarded as the two main pillars of the book: ‘1. (this is fundamental to all understanding of the facts) the twofold character of labour according to whether it is expressed in use value or exchange value, which is brought out in the very First Chapter; 2. the treatment of surplus value regardless of its particular forms as profit, interest, ground rent, etc.’ (Marx to Engels, 24 August 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 407).
Capital was put on sale on 14 September 1867.35  The high price of the book – three thalers – was equivalent to a worker’s weekly wage. Jenny von Westphalen wrote to Kugelmann: ‘There can be few books that have been written in more difficult circumstances, and I am sure I could write a secret history of it which would tell of many, extremely many unspoken troubles and anxieties and torments’(Jenny Marx to Kugelmann, 24 December 1867, Marx 1983: 578). Following the final modifications, the table of contents was as follows:

Preface
1. Commodity and money
2. The transformation of money into capital
3. The production of absolute surplus value
4. The production of relative surplus value
5. Further research on the production of absolute and relative surplus value
6. The process of accumulation of capital
Appendix to Part 1, 1: The form of value (Marx 1983: 9-10).

Despite the long correction process and the final addition, the structure of the work would be considerably expanded over the coming years, and various further modifications would be made to the text. Capital, Volume I, therefore continued to absorb significant energies on Marx’s part even after its publication.

4. In Search of the Definitive Version
In October 1867, Marx returned to Capital, Volume II. But this brought a recurrence of his medical complaints: liver pains, insomnia, and the blossoming of ‘two small carbuncles near the membrum’. Nor did the ‘incursions from without’ or the ‘aggravations of home life’ leave off; there was a certain bitterness in his sage remark to Engels that ‘my sickness always originates in the mind’ (Marx to Engels, 19 October 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 453). As always, his friend helped out and sent all the money he could, together with a hope that it ‘drives away the carbuncles’ (Engels to Marx, 22 October 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 457). That is not what happened, though, and in late November Marx wrote to say: ‘The state of my health has greatly worsened, and there has been virtually no question of working’ (Marx to Engels, 27 November 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 477).
The new year, 1868, began much as the old one had ended. During the first weeks of January, Marx was even unable to attend to his correspondence. His wife Jenny confided to Becker that her ‘poor husband ha[d] once again been laid up and fettered hand and foot by his old, serious and painful complaint, which [was] becoming dangerous through its constant recurrence’ (Jenny Marx to Becker, ‘After 10 January 1868’, Marx and Engels 1987: 580). A few days later, his daughter Jenny reported to Engels: ‘Moor is once more being victimized by his old enemies, the carbuncles, and is, by the arrival of the latest, made to feel very ill at ease in a sitting posture’ (Laura Marx to Engels, 13 January 1868, Marx and Engels 1987: 583). Marx began to write again only towards the end of the month, when he told Engels that ‘for 2-3 weeks’ he would ‘do absolutely no work’; ‘it would be dreadful,’ he added, ‘if a third monster were to erupt’ (Marx to Engels, 25 January 1868, Marx and Engels 1987: 528).
As always, however, he returned as soon as he could to his research. During this period, he took a great interest in questions of history and agriculture, compiling notebooks of extracts from the works of various authors. Particularly important for him was the Introduction to the Constitutive History of the German Mark, Farm, Village, Town and Public Authority (1854) by the political theorist and legal historian Georg Ludwig von Maurer. Marx told Engels he had found Maurer’s books ‘extremely significant’, since they approached in an entirely different way  ‘not only the primitive age but also the entire later development of the free imperial cities, of the estate owners possessing immunity, of public authority, and of the struggle between the free peasantry and serfdom’ (Marx to Engels, 25 March 1868, Marx and Engels 1988: 557).  Marx further approved of Maurer’s demonstration ‘at length that private property in land only arose later’ (Marx to Engels, 14 March 1868, Marx and Engels 1988: 547).  By contrast, he waxed sarcastic about those who were ‘surprised to find what is newest in what is oldest, and even egalitarians to a degree that would have made Proudhon shudder’ (Marx to Engels, 25 March 1868, Marx and Engels 1988: 557).
Also in this period, Marx studied in depth three German works by Karl Fraas: Climate and the Vegetable World throughout the Ages, a History of Both (1847), A History of Agriculture (1852) and The Nature of Agriculture (1857). Marx found the first of these ‘very interesting’, especially appreciating the part in which Kraas demonstrated that ‘climate and flora change in historical times’. Writing to Engels, he described the author as ‘a Darwinist before Darwin’, who admitted ‘even the species developing in historical times’. He was also struck by his ecological considerations and his related concern that ‘cultivation – when it proceeds in natural growth and is not consciously controlled (as a bourgeois he naturally does not reach this point) – leaves deserts behind it’.  Here too, Marx could detect what he called ‘an unconscious socialist tendency’ (Marx to Engels, 25 March 1868, Marx and Engels 1988: 559).
While affording Marx a little energy for these new scientific studies, the state of his health continued its ups and downs. In late March, he reported to Engels that it was such that he should ‘really give up working and thinking entirely for some time’. But he added that would be ‘hard’ for him, even if he had ‘the means to loaf around’ (Marx to Engels, 25 March 1868, Marx and Engels 1987: 557). The new interruption came just as he was recommencing work on the second version of Volume II – after a gap of nearly three years since the first half of 1865. He completed the first two chapters in the course of the spring (Marx 2008), in addition to a group of preparatory manuscripts – on the relationship between surplus value and rate of profit, the law of the rate of profit, and the metamorphoses of capital – which occupied him until the end of 1868.36
At the end of April 1868, Marx sent Engels a new schema for his work, with particular reference to ‘the method by which the rate of profit is developed’ (Marx to Engels, 30 April 1868, Marx and Engels 1988: 21). This would be the last occasion when Marx referred in his correspondence to the law of the tendency of the rate of profit to decline. Despite the major economic crises that developed after 1873, Marx never again mentioned this concept to which the whole third section of Volume III (written in 1864-65) is devoted – and which has received so much emphasis in later times; it was as if he thought it to have been superseded. In the same letter, he made it clear that Volume II would present the ‘process of circulation of capital on the basis of the premises developed’ in Capital, Volume I. He intended to set out, in as satisfactory a manner as possible, the ‘formal determinations’ of fixed capital, circulating capital and the turnover of capital – and hence to investigate ‘the social intertwining of the different capitals, of parts of capital and of revenue (=m)’. Instead, Marx had decided to present ‘the conversion of surplus value into its different forms and separate component parts’ (Marx to Engels, 30 April 1868, Marx and Engels 1988: 21).
In May, however, the health problems were back. In the second week of August, he told Kugelmann of his hope to finish the entire work by ‘the end of September’ 1869 (Marx to Kugelmann, 10 August 1868, Marx and Engels 1988: 82). But the autumn brought an outbreak of carbuncles, and in Spring 1869, when Marx was still working on the third chapter – entitled in this version ‘The Real Relations of the Circulation Process and the Reproduction Process’ – of Volume II (Marx 2008). His plan to finish it by 1869 seemed realistic, since the second version of the text he had written since Spring 1868 represented an advance in both qualitative and quantitative terms. His liver too yet another turn for the worse. His misfortunes continued in the following years, with troublesome regularity, and prevented him from ever completing Volume II.
There were also theoretical reasons for the delay. From Autumn 1868 to Spring 1869, determined to get on top of the latest developments in capitalism, Marx compiled copious excerpts from texts on the finance and money markets that appeared in The Money Market Review, The Economist and similar publications.37 His ever-growing interest in developments on the other side of the Atlantic drove him to seek out the most up-to-date information. He wrote to his friend Sigfrid Meyer that ‘it would be of great value … if [he] could dig up some anti-bourgeois material about landownership and agrarian relations in the United States’. He explained that, ‘since [he would] be dealing with rent in [his] 2nd volume, material against H. Carey’s “harmonies” would be especially welcome’ (Marx to Meyer, 4 July 1868, Marx and Engels 1988: 61).
Moreover, in Autumn 1869, having become aware of new (in reality, insignificant) literature about changes in Russia, he decided to learn Russian so that he could study it for himself. He pursued this new interest with his usual rigour, and in early 1870 Jenny told Engels that, ‘instead of looking after himself, [he had begun] to study Russian hammer and tongs, went out seldom, ate infrequently, and only showed the carbuncle under his arm when it was already very swollen and had hardened’ (Jenny Marx to Engels, ‘About 17 January 1870’, Marx and Engels 1988: 551). Engels hastened to write to his friend, trying to persuade him that ‘in the interests of the Volume II’ he needed ‘a change of life-style’; otherwise, if there was ‘constant repetition of such suspensions’, he would never finish the book (Engels to Marx, 19 January 1870, Marx and Engels 1988: 408).
The prediction was spot on. In early summer, summarizing what had happened in the previous months, Marx told Kugelmann that his work had been ‘held up by illness throughout the winter’, and that he had ‘found it necessary to mug up on [his] Russian, because, in dealing with the land question, it ha[d] become essential to study Russian landowning relationships from primary sources’ (Marx to Kugelmann, 27 June 1870, Marx and Engels 1988: 528).
After all the interruptions and a period of intense political activity for the International following the birth of the Paris Commune, Marx turned to work on a new edition of Capital, Volume I. Dissatisfied with the way in which he had expounded the theory of value, he spent December 1871 and January 1872 rewriting the 1867 appendix, and this led him to rewrite the first chapter itself. The result of this labour was the manuscript known as ‘Additions and Changes to Capital, Volume I’ (1871-72) (Marx 1983: 1-55). During the revision of the 1867 edition, Marx inserted a number of additions and clarifications and also refined the structure of the entire book.38 Some of these changes concerned surplus value, the difference between constant capital and variable capital, and the use of machinery and technology. He also expanded the new edition from six chapters to seven books containing 25 chapters, themselves subdivided into more detailed sections. The new edition came out in 1872, with a print run of three thousand copies.
The year 1872 was a year of fundamental importance for the dissemination of Capital, since April saw the appearance of the Russian translation – the first in a long series (Musto and Amini Forthcoming 2020). Begun by German Lopatin and completed by the economist Nikolai Danielson, it was regarded by Marx as ‘masterly’ (Marx to Davidson, 28 May 1872, Marx and Engels 1989: 385). Lessner related that ‘the event, [which was considered] an important sign of the times, turned into a festive occasion for himself and for his family and friends’ (Lessner 1907).
In a letter of May 1872 to Liebknecht, Jenny von Westphalen – who with her daughters had shared the joy of this success and other of Marx’s achievements – described most effectively how gender differences also weighed in the common struggle for socialism. In all existing conflicts, she wrote, ‘we women have the harder part to bear, because it is the lesser one. A man draws strength from his struggle with the world outside, and is invigorated by the sight of the enemy, be their number legion. We remain sitting at home, darning socks. That does nothing to dispel our fears and the gnawing day-to-day petty worries slowly but surely sap our spirit’ (Jenny Marx to Liebknecht, 26 May 1872, Marx and Engels 1989: 580).
In this year, too, the publication of the French edition of Capital got under way. Entrusted to Joseph Roy, who had previously translated some Ludwig Feuerbach’s texts, it was scheduled to appear in batches with the French publisher Maurice Lachâtre, between 1872 and 1875. Marx agreed that it would be good to bring out a ‘cheap popular edition’ (Marx to Lafargue, 18 December 1871, Marx and Engels 1989: 283). ‘I applaud your idea of publishing the translation … in periodic instalments,’ he wrote. ‘In this form the work will be more accessible to the working class and for me that consideration outweighs any other’. Aware, however, that there was a ‘reverse side’ of the coin, he anticipated that the ‘method of analysis’ he had used would ‘make for somewhat arduous reading in the early chapters’, and that readers might ‘become discouraged when they were “unable to carry straight on”’.  He did not feel he could do anything about this ‘disadvantage’, ‘other than constantly caution and forewarn those readers concerned with the truth. There is no royal road to learning and the only people with any chance of scaling its sunlit peaks are those who have no fear of weariness when ascending the precipitous paths that lead up to them’ (Marx to Lachâtre, 18 March 1872, Marx and Engels 1989: 344).
In the end, Marx had to spend much more time on the translation than he had planned for the proof correction. As he wrote to Danielson, Roy had ‘often translated too literally’ and forced him to ‘rewrite whole passages in French, to make them more palatable to the French public’ (Marx to Danielson, 28 May 1872, Marx and Engels 1989: 385).
Earlier that month, his daughter Jenny had told Kugelmann that her father was ‘obliged to make numberless corrections’, rewriting ‘not only whole sentences but entire pages’ (Jenny Marx to Kugelmann, 3 May 1872, Marx and Engels 1989: 578) – and a month later she added that the translation was so ‘imperfect’ that he had been ‘obliged to rewrite the greater part of the first chapter’ (Jenny Marx to Kugelmann, 27 June 1872, Marx and Engels 1989: 582).  Subsequently, Engels wrote in similar vein to Kugelmann that the French translation had proved a ‘real slog’ for Marx and that he had ‘more or less had to rewrite the whole thing from the beginning’ (Engels to Kugelmann, 1 July 1873, Marx and Engels 1989: 515). At the end of his labours, Marx himself remarked that they had ‘consumed so much of [his] time that [he would] not again collaborate in any way on a translation’ (Marx to Sorge, 27 September 1877, Marx and Engels 1991: 276).
In revising the translation (Marx 1989c), moreover, Marx decided to introduce some additions and modifications. These mostly concerned the section on the process of capital accumulation, but also some specific points such as the distinction between ‘concentration’ and ‘centralization’ of capital. In the postscript to the French edition, he did not hesitate to attach to it ‘a scientific value independent of the original’ (Marx 1996: 24). It was no accident that in 1877, when an English edition already seemed a possibility, Marx wrote to Sorge that a translator ‘must without fail … compare the 2nd German edition with the French edition, in which [he had] included a good deal of new matter and greatly improved [his] presentation of much else’ (Marx to Sorge, 27 September 1877, Marx and Engels 1991: 276). In a letter of November 1878, in which he weighed the positive and negative sides of the French edition, he wrote to Danielson that it contained ‘many important changes and additions’, but that he had ‘also sometimes been obliged – principally in the first chapter – to simplify [aplatir] the matter’ (Marx to Danielson, 15 November 1878, Marx and Engels 1991: 343).  For this reason, he felt it necessary to clarify later in the month that the chapters ‘Commodities and Money’ and ‘The Transformation of Money into Capital’ should be ‘translated exclusively from the German text’ (Marx to Danielson, 28 November 1878, Marx and Engels 1991: 346).39
The drafts of Capital, Volume II, which were left in anything but a definitive state, present a number of theoretical problems. The manuscripts of Capital, Volume III, have a highly fragmentary character, and Marx never managed to update them in a way that reflected the progress of his research.40 It should also be borne in mind that he was unable to complete a revision of Capital, Volume I, that included the changes and additions he intended to improve his magnum opus.41 In fact, neither the French edition of 1872-75 nor the German edition of 1881 can be considered the definitive version that he would have liked it to be.
The critical spirit with which Marx composed his magnum opus reveals just how distant he was from the dogmatic author that many of his adversaries and self-styled disciples presented to the world. Unfinished though it remained, those who today want to use essential theoretical concepts for the critique of the capitalist mode of production still cannot dispense with reading Marx’s Capital.

 

Translated from the Italian by Patrick Camiller

 

References
Anderson, Kevin (1983) ‘The «Unknown» Marx’s Capital Volume I: The French Edition of 1872-75, 100 Years Later’, in Review of Radical Political Economics, vol.15, n. 4, pp. 71-80.
Balzac, Honoré de (2001) The Unknown Masterpiece, New York: Review of Books.
Bönig, Jürgen (2017) Karl Marx in Hamburg. Der Produktionsprozess des Kapital, Hamburg: VSA.
D’Hondt, Jacques (1985) ‘La traduction tendancieuse du «Capital» par Joseph Roy’, in Georges Labica (ed by), 1883-1983, l’œuvre de Marx un siècle après, Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, pp. 131-37.
Engels, Frederick (1996) ‘Preface to the First German Edition’, in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 36: Karl Marx, Capital, Volume II, pp. 5–23.
Enzensberger, Hans Magnus (ed.) (1973) Gespräche mit Marx und Engels, Frankfurt: Suhrkamp.
Happle, Rudolf and Koenig, Arne (2008) ‘A lesson to be learned from Karl Marx: smoking triggers hidradenitis suppurativa’, in British Journal of Dermatology, vol. 159, no. 1, pp. 255-256.
Heinrich, Michael (1996-1997) ‘Engels’ Edition of the Third Volume of Capital and Marx’s Original Manuscript’, in Science & Society, vol. 60, no. 4, pp. 452-466.
Heinrich, Michael (2011) ‘Entstehungs- und Auflösungsgeschichte des Marxschen Kapital’, in Werner Bonefeld and Michael Heinrich (eds.), Kapital & Kritik. Nach der ‘neuen’ Marx-Lektüre, Hamburg: VSA, pp. 155-193.
Heinrich, Michael (2016) ‘Capital after MEGA. Discontinuities, Interruptions, and New Beginnings’, in Crisis & Critique, 3/2, pp. 92-138.
Krätke, Michael R. (2005) ‘Le dernier Marx et le Capital’, Actuel Marx, vol. 37, n. 1, pp. 145-160.
Krätke, Michael R. (2017) Kritik der politischen Ökonomie Heute, Hamburg: VSA.
Lessner, Frederick (1907) Sixty years in the Social-Democratic movement, before 1848 and after: Recollections of an old Communist, London: Twentieth Century Press.
Marx, Karl (1961 [1863-64]) Manuskripte über die polnische Frage, S’-Gravenhage: Mouton.
Marx, Karl (1976a [1861-63]) ‘Drittes Capitel. Capital und Profit’, in Idem, Zur Kritik der politischen Ökonomie (Manuskript 1861–1863), in MEGA2, vol. II/3.5, pp. 1598-1675.
Marx, Karl (1976b [1864]) ‘Appendix: Results of the Immediate Process of Production’, in Capital, Volume I, London: Penguin/New Left Review, pp. 941-1084.
Marx, Karl (1983 [1867]) Das Kapital. Kritik der Politischen Ökonomie. Erster Band, Hamburg 1867, in MEGA2, vol. II /5, Berlin: Dietz Verlag.
Marx, Karl (1985a [1865]) ‘Value, Prices and Profit’, in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 20: Marx and Engels: Letters 1864–68, Moscow: Progress Publishers, pp. 101-149.
Marx, Karl (1985b [1865]) ‘Agreement between Mr. Karl Marx and Mr. Otto Meissner, Publisher and Bookseller’, in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 20: Marx and Engels: Letters 1864–68, Moscow: Progress Publishers, pp. 361-362.
Marx, Karl (1987a [1859]) ‘A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy’, in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 29: Marx 1857–61, Moscow: Progress Publishers, pp. 257–417.
Marx, Karl (1987b [1859]) ‘Draft Plan of the Chapter on Capital’, in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 29: Marx 1857–61, Moscow: Progress Publishers, pp. 511-517.
Marx, Karl (1988 [1861–63]) Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 30: Economic Manuscripts of 1861–63, Moscow: Progress Publishers.
Marx, Karl (1989a [1861–63]) Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 31: Economic Manuscripts of 1861–63, Moscow: Progress Publishers.
Marx, Karl (1989b [1861–63]) Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 32: Economic Manuscripts of 1861–63, Moscow: Progress Publishers.
Marx, Karl (1989c [1872-75]) Le Capital, Paris 1872-1875, in MEGA2, vol. II/7, Berlin: Dietz Verlag.
Marx, Karl (1991 [1861–63]) Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 33, Economic Manuscript of 1861–63, Moscow: Progress Publishers.
Marx, Karl (1993 [1857-58]) Grundrisse, Harmondsworth: Penguin Books.
Marx, Karl (1996 [1875]) ‘Afterword to the French Edition’, in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 35: Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I, Moscow: Progress Publishers, p. 24.
Marx, Karl (1998 [1894]) Capital, Volume III, in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 37: Karl Marx, Capital, Volume III, Moscow: Progress Publishers.
Marx, Karl (2008 [1868-70]) ‘Das Kapital (Ökonomisches Manuskript 1868-1870). Zweites Buch. Der Zirkulationsprozess des Kapitals (Manuskript II)’, in MEGA2, vol. II/11, Berlin: Akademie Verlag, pp. 1-339.
Marx, Karl (2012 [1863-68]) Ökonomische Manuskripte 1863-1868, in MEGA2, vol. II/4.3, Berlin: Akademie Verlag.
Marx, Karl (2015 [1864-65]) Marx’s Economic Manuscript of 1864-1865, Leiden: Brill.
Marx, Karl (2017 [1857-58]) Exzerpte, Zeitungsausschnitte und Notizen zur Weltwirtschaftskrise (Krisenhefte). November 1857 bis Februar 1858, in MEGA², IV/14, Berlin: De Gruyter.
Marx, Karl, IISH, Marx-Engels Papers, B 93, B 98, B 100, B 101, B 102, B 103, B 104, B 108, B 109, B 113 and B 114.
Marx, Karl, RGASPI f.1, d. 1397, d. 1691, d. 5583.
Marx, Karl and Engels, Friedrich (1983) Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 40: Letters, 1856–59, Moscow: Progress Publishers.
Marx, Karl and Engels, Friedrich (1985) Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 41: Letters, 1860–64, Moscow: Progress Publishers.
Marx, Karl and Engels, Friedrich (1987) Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 42: Letters, 1864–68, Moscow: Progress Publishers.
Marx, Karl and Engels, Friedrich (1988) in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 43: Letters 1868–70, Moscow: Progress Publishers.
Marx, Karl and Engels, Friedrich (1989) in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 44: Letters 1870–73, Moscow: Progress Publishers.
Marx, Karl and Engels, Friedrich (1991) in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 45: Letters 1874–79, Moscow: Progress Publishers.
Marx, Karl and Engels, Friedrich (1993) in Marx Engels Collected Works, vol. 46: Letters 1880–83, Moscow: Progress Publishers.
Musto, Marcello (Ed. – 2008), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse: Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, London–New York: Routledge.
Musto, Marcello (Ed. – 2014), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later, London–New York: Bloomsbury.
Musto, Marcello (2018), Another Marx: Early Manuscripts to the International, London–New York: Bloomsbury.
Musto, Marcello (Forthcoming 2020), The Moor’s Last Journey: An Intellectual Biography of the Late Marx, Stanford: Stanford University Press.
Musto, Marcello and Amini, Babak (Eds. – Forthcoming 2020) The Routledge Handbook of Marx’s “Capital”: A Global History of Translation, Dissemination and Reception, London-New York: Routledge.
Napoleoni, Claudio (1975) Lezioni sul Capitolo sesto inedito di Marx, Turin: Bollati Boringhieri.
Rosdolsky, Roman (1977) The Making of Marx’s Capital, London: Pluto.
Roth, Regina (2012/13) ‘Die Herausgabe von Band 2 und 3 des Kapital durch Engels’, in Marx-Engels Jahrbuch, vol. 2012/13, pp. 168-182.
Rubel, Maximilien (1974) Marx Critique du marxisme, Paris: Payot.
Rubel, Maximilien, (1981) Rubel on Karl Marx: Five Essays in Joseph O’ Malley and Keith Algozin (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Shuster, Sam (2008) ‘The nature and consequence of Karl Marx’s skin disease’, in British Journal of Dermatology, vol. 158, no. 1, pp. 1-3.
Vollgraf, Carl-Erich (2012) ‘Einführung’, in MEGA², vol. II/4.3, pp. 421-474.
Vollgraf, Carl-Erich (2012/13) ‘Das Kapital – bis zuletzt ein “Werk im Werden”’, in Marx-Engels Jahrbuch, vol. 2012/13, pp. 113-133.
Vollgraf, Carl-Erich (2018) ‘Marx’s Further Work on Capital’, in Marcel van der Linden and Gerald Hubmann (eds.), Marx’s Capital: An Unfinishable Project?, Leiden: Brill, pp. 56-79.
Vollgraf, Carl-Erich, Jungnickel, Jürgen and Naron, Stephen (2002) ‘Marx in Marx’s Words? On Engels’ Edition of the Main Manuscript of Volume III of Capital’, in International Journal of Political Economy, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 35-78.

Notes
1 This expression has been often used by Maximilien Rubel (1981: 192!.). Cf. also Musto (2018: 55–81).
2 The title later given to these manuscripts was inspired by this letter. On Marx’s Grundrisse cf. Musto 2008.
3 A few days later, Marx communicated his plans to Lassalle: ‘The present commercial crisis has impelled me to set to work seriously on my outlines of political
economy, and also to prepare something on the present crisis’ (Marx to Lassalle, 21 December 1857, Marx and Engels 1983: 226).
4 These notebooks total 1,472 quarto pages. See Engels (1996: 6).
5 Previously, in the Grundrisse, Marx had set forth a similar, though less precise, ‘arrangement of the material’ (Marx 1993: 108, 227–8, 264 and 27), at four separate points. He also anticipated the six- part schema planned for A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy in two letters from the first half of 1858: one to Ferdinand Lassalle (Marx to Lassalle, 22 February 1858, Marx and Engels 1983: 268–71), and one to Friedrich Engels (Marx to Engels, 2 April 1858, Marx and Engels 1983: 296–304). Between February and March 1859, he also drafted a long preparatory index for his work, which in the English edition of Marx (1993), became the ‘Analytical Contents List’, pp. 69–80. On the original plan and its variations, see the by now dated, but still fundamental work by Roman Rosdolsky (1977: 1–62). More limited, however, is Rubel (1974: 379, 389), which claims that Marx did not change the original plan he devised in 1857.
6 These notebooks were ignored for more than 100 years, before a Russian translation was finally published in 1973, in a supplementary Volume 47 of the Marx- Engels Sochinenya. An original German edition appeared only in 1976 in MEGA2, vol. II/3.1.
7 Between 1905 and 1910, Kautsky published the manuscripts in question in a form that deviated somewhat from the originals.
8 It was to have followed: 1) the transformation of money into capital; 2) absolute surplus value; 3) relative surplus value; and 4) a section – one he never actually wrote – on how these three should be considered in combination.
9 In the MECW these manuscripts are indicated with the title Economic Manuscript of 1861–63.
10 This notebook is the last of those comprising the so- called Theories of Surplus-Value, vol. I, in Marx (1989a).
11 These notebooks form part of the Theories of Surplus Value, vol. II, in Marx (1989a).
12 These are the final notebooks that form part of the Theories of Surplus Value, vol. III, in Marx (1989b).
13 See the index to the Grundrisse, written in June 1858 and contained in Notebook M (the same as that of the ‘1857 Introduction’), as well as the draft index for the third chapter, written in 1860: Marx (1987b: 511–17). Michael Heinrich (2016: 107) shows that, after the middle of 1863, Marx no longer used the concept of ‘capital in general’ in the subdivision of his work and never mentioned it again in either his manuscripts or his correspondence. It is therefore possible that he ‘realised that the double requirement which he expected from the section of “Capital in General” – to present specific content […] at a certain level of abstraction […] – could not be fulfilled’.
14 The first chapter had already been outlined in Notebook XVI of the economic manuscripts of 1861–1863. Marx prepared a schema of the second in Notebook XVIII, see Marx (1991: 299). 15 See the more than 60 pages contained in IISH, Marx- Engels Papers, B 98. On the basis of this research, Marx began one of his many unfinished projects, see Marx (1961).
16 IISH, Marx- Engels Papers, B 93, B 100, B 101, B 102, B 103, B 104 contain some 535 pages of notes. Additionally, Marx also used material from three notebooks RGASPI f.1, d. 1397, d. 1691, d. 5583. In order to compile notebooks XXII and XXIII.
17 Heinrich (2011) argued that the manuscripts from this period should be regarded not as the third version of the work begun with the Grundrisse, but as the first draft of Capital. Krätke (2005) indicated that the overall outlook and scope of Capital remained unchanged, even though Marx changed his plans several times after 1857.
18 Heinrich (2016: 111) noted that, when he was writing the second and third volumes, Marx was ‘far away from a situation in which these manuscripts could have served as a direct template for revision before going into print. In this respect one can say that Capital was still in a formation phase’.
19 In his view, Marx set aside the project of also writing books on the state, foreign trade and the world market.
20 With ‘No. 1’ Marx meant the 1859 A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy.
21 In recent years, dermatologists have reviewed the discussion on the causes of Marx’s disease. Sam Shuster (2008) suggested that he su!ered from hidradenitis suppurativa, while Rudolf Happle and Arne Koenig (2008) claimed even less plausibly, that the culprit was his heavy smoking of cigars. For Shuster’s reply to this suggestion, see Happle and Koenig (2008: 256).
22 The reasons why Marx did not insert this chapter into the published text of Capital, Volume I, remain unknown. For a commentary on it, see Napoleoni (1975).
23 This street was later renamed Maitland Park Road. Marx dedicated Capital, Volume I, to Wol!, his ‘unforgettable friend. […] Intrepid, faithful, noble protagonist of the proletariat’.
24 Fifty signatures were equivalent to 800 printed pages.
25 This was published in 1898 by Eleanor Marx, as Value, Price and Profit. This commonly used title was taken as the basis for the German translation that appeared the same year in Die Neue Zeit [The New Times].
26 The equivalent of 960 pages. Later, Meissner signaled his openness to modify his agreement with Marx: see Marx to Engels, 13 April 1867, Marx and Engels 1987: 357.
27 This division was followed by Engels when he published Capital, Volume III in 1894. See Vollgraf, Jungnickel and Naron (Spring 2002). See also the more recent: Vollgraf (2012/2013); Roth (2012/2013); and Krätke (2017), especially the final chapter ‘Gibt es ein Marx- Engels-Problem?’ For a critical assessment of Engels’s editing, see Heinrich (1996–1997).
28 Marx used these data in the third chapter of Volume One. It should be noted, however, that in late 1865 Marx still envisaged the publication of Volume One of Capital as a continuation of his writings of 1859. Only from the letter Marx to Kugelmann, 13 October 1866 can we be certain that he had decided to rewrite the first part. See Marx and Engels (1987: 328).
29 Vollgraf (2018: 63–4) points out that, when Marx described Capital as being ‘ready’ since 1865, he was referring to the ‘conceptual architecture’, not the ‘elaboration of the content chapter by chapter, and certainly not the complete exposition’. Marx continued to assess the work remaining to be done on the basis of size, not of ‘the rational core of his arguments’.
30 Marx then inserted his analysis of ground rent into Part Six, ‘The Transformation of Surplus Profit into Ground Rent’, of Volume III.
31 This realistic assertion clashes with some previous over- confident descriptions of the state of his texts. Since, apart from a few additions, Marx had no further opportunity to work on Volume III after 1865, his statement testifies both to Engels’s huge e!ort in preparing the book for publication and to its highly unfinished character. This should always be borne in mind by its readers and interpreters.
32 A traditional English folk song.
33 The most recent philological studies have shown that, contrary to what has always been believed, the original manuscript of Capital, Volume I, (of which the ‘Chapter Six. Results of the Immediate Process of Production’ was thought to be only surviving part) actually dates back to the 1863–64 period, and that Marx cut and pasted it into the copy he prepared for publication. See Vollgraf (2012).
34 For a full account of this period, see the recent Bönig (2017).
35 The distribution of the book began on 11 September 1867. See Institut für Marxismus- Leninismus, ‘Entstehung und Überlieferung’, in Marx (1983: 674).
36 These texts have recently been published in Marx (2012). The last part constitutes Manuscript IV of Volume II and contains new versions of Part One, ‘The Circulation of Capital’, and Part Two, ‘The Metamorphoses of Capital’.
37 Still unpublished, these notes are included in the IISH notebooks, Marx- Engels Papers, B 108, B 109, B 113 and B 114.
38 In 1867 Marx had divided the book into chapters. In 1872 these became sections, each with much more detailed subdivisions.
39 For a list of the additions and modifications in the French translation that were not included in the third and fourth German editions, see Marx (1983: 732–83). For confirmation of the merits of this edition, see Anderson (1983) and D’Hondt (1985). On the research of the last period of Marx’s life see Musto 2020 (forthcoming). 40 The editorial work that Engels undertook after his friend’s death to prepare the unfinished parts of Capital for publication was extremely complex. The various manuscripts, drafts and fragments of Volumes II and III, written between 1864 and 1881, correspond to approximately 2,350 pages of the MEGA2. Engels successfully published Volume II in 1885 and Volume III in 1894. However, it must be borne in mind that these two volumes emerged from the reconstruction of incomplete texts, often consisting of heterogeneous material. They were written in more than one period in time and thus include di!erent, and sometimes contradictory, versions of Marx’s ideas.
41 See, for example, Marx to Danielson, 13 December 1881: In the first instance I must first be restored to health, and in the second I want to finish o! the 2nd vol. […] as soon as possible.… I will arrange with my editor that I shall make for the 3d edition only the fewest possible alterations and additions. […] When these 1,000 copies forming the 3d edition are sold, then I may change the book in the way I should have done at present under di!erent circumstances. (Marx and Engels 1993: 161).

Categories
Book chapter

Marx’s Critique of German Social Democracy

I. The Limited Participation of the Germans to the International Working Men’s Association
The workers’ organizations that founded the International Working Men’s Association in 1864 were something of a motley. The central driving forces were British trade unionism and the mutualists, long dominant in France but strong also in Belgium and French-speaking Switzerland. Alongside these two components, there were the communists, grouped around the figure of Karl Marx, elements that had nothing to do with the socialist tradition, such as the followers of Giuseppe Mazzini, and some groups of French, Belgian and Swiss workers who joined the International with them a variety of confused theories, some of a utopian inspiration. The General Association of German Workers – the party led by followers of Ferdinand Lassalle – never affiliated to the International but orbited around it. This organization was hostile to trade unionism and conceived of political action in rigidly national terms.
In 1865, the International expanded in Europe and established its first important nuclei in Belgium and French-speaking Switzerland. The Prussian Combination Laws, which prevented German political associations from having regular contacts with organizations in other countries, meant that the International was unable to open sections in what was then the German Confederation. The General Association of German Workers – the first workers’ party in history, founded in 1863 and led by Lassalle’s disciple Johann Baptist von Schweitzer – followed a line of ambivalent dialogue with Otto von Bismarck and showed little or no interest in the International during the early years of its existence. It was an indifference shared by Wilhelm Liebknecht, despite his political proximity to Marx. Johann Philipp Becker tried to find a way round these difficulties through the Geneva-based “Group of German-speaking Sections.”
While Liebknecht did not understand the centrality of the international dimension for the struggle of the workers’ movement, Marx also had deep theoretical and political differences with von Schweitzer. In February 1865 he wrote to the latter that “the aid of the Royal Prussian government for co-operative societies,” which the Lassalleans welcomed, was “worthless as an economic measure, whilst, at the same time, it serve[d] to extend the system of tutelage, corrupt part of the working class and emasculate the movement.” Marx went on to reject any possibility of an alliance between the workers and the monarchy:
Just as the bourgeois party in Prussia discredited itself and brought about its present wretched situation by seriously believing that with the ‘New Era’ the government had fallen into its lap by the grace of the Prince Regent, so the workers’ party will discredit itself even more if it imagines that the Bismarck era or any other Prussian era will make the golden apples just drop into its mouth, by grace of the king. It is beyond all question that Lassalle’s ill-starred illusion that a Prussian government might intervene with socialist measures will be crowned with disappointment. The logic of circumstances will tell. But the honour of the workers’ party requires that it reject such illusions, even before their hollowness is punctured by experience. The working class is revolutionary or it is nothing.
The critique of state socialism was a common theme in Marx’s political reflections during that period. A few days after the letter to Schweitzer, he suggested to Engels that the position of the Lassalleans in Germany was akin to the “alliance of the “proletariat” with the “government” against the ‘liberal bourgeoisie’” which the two of them had firmly opposed in 1847.
Marx’s critique to the policy of German social democracy continued in 1866. In the Instructions for Delegates of the Provisional General Council, prepared for the Geneva congress, Marx underlined the basic function of trade unions against which not only the mutualists but also certain followers of Robert Owen in Britain and of Lassalle in Germany had taken a stand. Lassalle advocated the concept of an ‘iron law of wages’, which held that efforts to increase wages were futile and a distraction for workers from the primary task of assuming political power in the state. Marx wrote:
This activity of the Trades’ Unions is not only legitimate, it is necessary. It cannot be dispensed with so long as the present system of production lasts. On the contrary, it must be generalized by the formation and the combination of Trades’ Unions throughout all countries. On the other hand, unconsciously to themselves, the Trades’ Unions were forming centres of organization of the working class, as the mediaeval municipalities and communes did for the middle class. If the Trades’ Unions are required for the guerrilla fights between capital and labour, they are still more important as organized agencies for superseding the very system of wages labour and capital rule.
In the same document, Marx did not spare the existing unions his criticism. For they were “too exclusively bent upon the local and immediate struggles with capital [and had] not yet fully understood their power of acting against the system of wages slavery itself. They therefore kept too much aloof from general social and political movements”.
In September 1868, Marx returned to the question of state socialism. In a letter to Engels, he suggested that what von Schweitzer had described the previous month in Hamburg at the congress of the General Association of German Workers as the “summa of Lassalle’s discoveries” – that is, state credit for the foundation of productive associations – was “literally copied from the programme of French Catholic socialism”, inspired by Philip Buchez [1796-1850], which went back to “the days of Louis-Philippe” [1773-1850].
Instead, strong opposition to the government would have been good for the social struggle: “The most essential thing for the German working class is that it should cease to agitate by permission of the high government authorities. Such a bureaucratically schooled race must undergo a complete course of ‘self help’.”
In a letter to Schweitzer, Marx set out at greater length his differences with the Lassallean tendency. The first question was his opposition to the strategy of “state aid versus self-help”, which Buchez, the leader of Catholic socialism, [… had used] against the genuine workers’ movement in France’, and on the basis of which Lassalle himself had later made “concessions to the Prussian monarchy, to Prussian reaction (the feudal party) and even to the clericals”. For Marx, it was essential that the workers’ struggle should be free and independent. “The main thing is to teach [the worker] to walk by himself”, especially in Germany, where “he is regulated bureaucratically from childhood onwards” and believes in the authority of superiors.
The other significant area of disagreement was the theoretical and political rigidity of Lassalle and his followers. Marx criticized the comrade with whom he had been in touch for many years, on the grounds that “like everyone who claims to have in his pocket a panacea for the sufferings of the masses, [Lassalle] gave his agitation, from the very start, a religious, sectarian character,” and, being the founder of a sect, “he denied all natural connection with the earlier movement, both in Germany and abroad.” Lassalle was guilty of the same error as Proudhon: that of “not seeking the real basis of his agitation in the actual elements of the class movement, but of wishing, instead, to prescribe for that movement a course determined by a certain doctrinaire recipe.” For Marx, any “sect seeks its raison d’être and its point d’honneur not in what it has in common with the class movement, but in the particular shibboleth distinguishing it from that movement.” His opposition to that kind of politics could not have been clearer.
In the fight against state socialism, Marx also took issue with Liebknecht. After one of his speeches in the Reichstag in Summer 1869, Marx commented to Engels: “The brute believes in the future ‘state of democracy’! Secretly that means sometimes constitutional England, sometimes the bourgeois United States, sometimes wretched Switzerland. He has no conception of revolutionary politics.”
What disappointed Marx most was that in the North German Confederation, despite the existence of two political organizations of the workers’ movement – the Lassallean General Association of German Workers and the Marxist Social Democratic Workers’ Party of Germany – there was little enthusiasm for the International and few requests to affiliate to it. During its first three years, German militants virtually ignored its existence, fearing persecution at the hands of the authorities. The weak internationalism of the Germans ultimately weighed more heavily than any legal aspects, however, and declined still further when the movement became more preoccupied with internal matters.
The unification of Germany in 1871 confirmed the onset of a new age in which the nation-state would be the central form of political, legal and territorial identity. This placed a question mark over any supranational body that required its members to surrender a sizeable share of their political leadership. At the same time, the growing differences between national movements and organizations made it extremely difficult for the General Council of the International to produce a political synthesis capable of satisfying the demands of all. Anyway, after the end of the International, in September 1872, Marx continued to criticize the path German Social Democracy any time he had a chance.

II. Against the “Gotha Program” and the Social-Democratic Deviation
At the end of 1874, Marx learned from the papers that the General Association of German Workers, founded by Ferdinand Lassalle, and the Social Democratic Workers’ Party, linked to Marx, intended to unite into a single political force. Marx and Engels were not consulted about the merits of the project, and it was only in March that they received the draft programme of the new party. Engels then wrote to August Bebel that he could not “forgive his not having told us a single word about the whole business”; and he warned that he and Marx could “never give [their] allegiance to a new party” set up on the basis of Lassallean state socialism. Despite this sharp declaration, the leaders who had been active in building what would become the Socialist Workers’ Party of Germany (SAPD) did not change their positions.
Marx therefore felt obliged to write a long critique of the draft programme for the unification congress to be held on 22 May 1875 in the city of Gotha. In the letter accompanying his text, he recognized that “every step of real movement is more important than a dozen programmes”. But in the case of “programmes of principles”, they had to be written with great care, since they set “benchmarks for all the world to … gauge how far the party [has] progressed”. In the Critique of the Gotha Programme (1875), Marx inveighed against the numerous imprecisions and mistakes in the new manifesto drafted in Germany.
For example, in criticizing the concept of “fair distribution”, he asked polemically: “Do not the bourgeois assert that present-day distribution is “fair”? And is it not, in fact, the only “fair” distribution on the basis of the present-day mode of production?” In his view, the political demand to be inserted into the programme was not Lassalle’s “undiminished proceeds of labour” for every worker, but the transformation of the mode of production. Marx explained, with his customary rigour, that Lassalle “did not know what wages were”. Following bourgeois economists, he “took the appearance for the essence of the matter”. Marx explained:
Wages are not what they appear to be, namely the value, or price, of labour, but only a masked form for the value, or price, of labour power. Thereby the whole bourgeois conception of wages hitherto, as well as all the criticism hitherto directed against this conception, was thrown overboard once for all and it was made clear that the wage-worker has permission to work for his own subsistence, that is, to live only insofar as he works for a certain time gratis for the capitalist (and hence also for the latter’s co-consumers of surplus value); that the whole capitalist system of production turns on increasing this gratis labour by extending the working day or by developing productivity, that is, increasing the intensity of labour power, etc.; that, consequently, the system of wage labour is a system of slavery, and indeed of a slavery which becomes more severe in proportion as the social productive forces of labour develop, whether the worker receives better or worse payment.
Another controversial point concerned the role of the state. Marx maintained that capitalism could be overthrown only through the “revolutionary transformation of society”. The Lassalleans held that “socialist organization of the total labour arises from the state aid that the state gives to the producers’ co-operative societies which the state, not the worker, calls into being.” For Marx, however, “cooperative societies [were]of value only insofar as they [were] the independent creations of the workers and not protégés either of governments or of the bourgeois”; the idea “that with state loans one can build a new society just as well as a new railway” was typical of Lassalle’s theoretical ambiguities.
All in all, Marx observed that the political manifesto for the fusion congress showed that socialist ideas were having a hard time penetrating the German workers’ organizations. In keeping with his early convictions, he emphasized that it was wrong on their part to treat “the state as an independent entity that possesses its own intellectual, ethical and libertarian bases”, instead of “treating existing society as … the basis of the existing state”. By contrast, Wilhelm Liebknecht and other Ge