Created: Tuesday, 19 February 2019 10:27
( 0 Votes ) 
Category: Reviews Tags: italiano Written by Marcello Musto

Sergio Caroli, review of Karl Marx. Biografia intellettuale e politica 1857-1883, La Voce di Parma, 19 February 2019.

 

Marx liberato da stereotipi ammuffiti

Forte della pubblicazione di testi inediti di Karl Marx, Marcello Musto, professore associato di Sociologia teorica presso la York University di Toronto, analizza nel saggio Karl Marx.

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Created: Sunday, 23 December 2018 19:37
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Category: Reviews Tags: japanese Written by Marcello Musto

Shuji Kamioka, Review of アナザー・マルクス (Another Marx), Amazon.co.jp, 23 December 2018.

 

マルクス・リバイバルの旗手役であるムストが若い世代に向けて書いたマルクスの新しい伝記。

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Created: Tuesday, 03 July 2018 11:29
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Category: Journalism Tags: indonesian Written by Marcello Musto

Surat-surat untuk Revolusi: Persahabatan Marx-Engels

 

DALAM suasana perayaan ulang tahun Karl Marx yang ke-200, saya ingin berbagi cerita tentang persahabatannya dengan Friedrich Engels.

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Created: Saturday, 28 April 2018 12:16
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Category: Journalism Tags: deutsch Written by Marcello Musto

Seine letzten, arbeitsamen Jahre

Im Winter war er oft müde und geschwächt. Das Alter begann, seine gewohnte Energie zu beschränken, und seine Frau hatte Grund, über seinen Gesundheitszustand zunehmend besorgt zu sein. Aber er war immer noch Karl Marx. Mit der gleichen Leidenschaft wie immer plagte er sich ab für die Sache der Emanzipation der Arbeiterklasse. Und er tat es mit derselben Methode, die er sich in seinen jungen Jahren...

Created: Friday, 01 September 2017 09:58
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Category: Books Tags: italiano Written by Marcello Musto

Cover_Donzelli_2.jpg

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Created: Thursday, 12 January 2017 00:10
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Category: Graduate Courses Written by Marcello Musto

Additional info
  • University Name: York University

York University

Department of Sociology

Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies

GS/SOCI 6711 3.0 (W) - M

Social Movements

Winter 2017

Course Syllabus

Course Director: Marcello Musto

Class Time: Thursday 14:30 - 17:30

Class Location: Ross Bldg. S 501

Office Hours: Tuesday 17:30 - 18:30 (or by appointment)

Office Location: Ross Bldg. N 833A

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Unit Description


This course deals with the developments of some of the most significant international social movements from the end of Ancien Régime to the fall of Berlin Wall (1789-1989). These include social movements that were formed around the French Revolution, the Revolutions of 1848, the Paris Commune, the birth of Soviet Union, the Chinese Revolution, the anticolonialist process in Asia, Africa and Latin America, the protests of 1968, as well as Socialist Feminism. These movements will be critically analysed, both in terms of history of ideas and of their major socio-political characteristics.

Course Requirements

Class Participation:

This course is taught in weekly seminars. Attendance is strongly recommended and students are expected to participate actively in class discussion.

Presentation:

Classes will begin with a student presentation of 30 to 40 minutes. Avoid just reading a paper aloud and get your colleagues involved.

Each student is encouraged to discuss with the course director the main points of her/his presentation at least one week in advance. Presentations will be an essential part of our seminar. You will orientate the discussion toward them and will provide to your colleagues more extended insights concerning the topic of the week. That will be possible on the basis of the additional readings already indicated in the syllabus and/or of further texts that will be suggested by the course director.

In your presentation, you should avoid devoting too much time to the assigned readings. You will only highlight their main points (in 5 to 10 min.) and pose some open questions (at least 3/4) for the debate - to which you will respond in the end, expressing your own point of view.

The most important part of the presentation (15 to 20 min.) should be dedicated to an exposition of the main characteristics of social movement in question: main achievements, class composition, role of women, socio-historical context, main ideas, political organization, etc.

In the second part of each class there will also be a 10 minutes contribution from a discussant. She/he should call the attention of other students to a few particular aspects of the topic of the week, including the influence (or reception, in case of theory) in the world. The presenter and the discussant should cooperate before class, in order to avoid overlapping with the questions they will pose and with the problematics through which they will stimulate the discussion.

Final Paper Proposal:

Students are free to propose their own final paper topic, but it must be related to one or more social movements, as well as key issues, discussed during the seminar. The final paper proposal should be 3-4 pages (1.500 to 2.000 words) and include the following information:

- indication of the tentative title and of the sections in which the writing will be divided;

- preliminary outline of the text;

- 5 keywords concerning the themes and the concepts to be addressed;

- a bibliography of at least 10 sources consulted;

Final paper proposals will be due, in hard copy and by email, on March 2.

Please note that you cannot write the final paper on the same author(s) you have done your presentation. Exceptions are possible, but unlikely. In any case, the matter must be discussed in advance.

Final Paper:

The Final Paper, approved through the Final Paper Proposal, will be due in hard copy and by email no later than April 30. It should:

- be a maximum of 6.000 words, including notes and final references;

- be clearly structured and divided into at least 3 or 4 sections;

- have references from hard copy books, with the indication of page numbers (no references from the internet).

Course Evaluation

Class Participation

20%

Presentation

20%

Final Paper Proposal

10%

Final Paper

50%


Schedule of Classes and Readings

Week 1 – 12 January: French Revolution

With the participation of Prof. Terrell Carver (University of Bristol)

Recommended Readings:

Eric Hobsbawm, The Age of Revolution 1789-1848, Chapters 1, 2 and maps, pp. 7-52 and 309-320.

https://libcom.org/files/Eric%20Hobsbawm%20-%20Age%20Of%20Revolution%201789%20-1848.pdf

Week 2 – 19 January: From 1789 to the Revolutions of 1848

With the participation of Prof. George Comninel (York University)

Required Readings:

George Rudé, The Crowd in the French Revolution, in particular Part III: "The Anatomy of the Revolutionary Crowd", pp. 178-239.

Carl Landauer, European Socialism, Chapter I: "The Three Anticapitalistic Movements", (sections 1-5), Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1959, pp. 21-59.

William Sewell, Work & Revolution in France, Cambridge: CUP, 1980, Chapter 9: "The July Revolution and the Emergence of Class Consciousness", pp. 194-218; and Chapter 11: "The Revolution of 1848", pp. 243-276.

Additional Readings:

Roger Magraw, "Socialism, Syndicalism and French Labour before 1914", in Dick Geary, Labour and Socialist Movements in Europe before 1914, New York: Berg, 1989, pp. 48-100.

George D. H. Cole's, A History of Socialist Thought, Vol. I (The Forerunners 1789-1850) , Chapter I: "The Great French Revolution and the Conspiracy of Gracchus Babeuf", pp. 11-22.

https://libcom.org/library/history-socialist-thought-volume-i-forerunners-1789-1850

Pamela Pilbeam, French Socialists before Marx: Workers, Women, and the Social Question in France . Teddington: Acumen 2000, in particular Chapter 8: "Worker Associations before 1848".

Eric Hazan, A History of the Barricade, London: Verso, 2015.

Week 3 – 26 January: Paris Commune

Required Readings:

Donny Gluckstein, The Paris Commune: A Revolution in Democracy, Chapter 1: "The Commune's Achievements", pp. 1-42.

https://books.google.ie/books?id=fGrR78ZkBJcC&printsec=frontcover&hl=it&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

Karl Marx, The Civil War in France, in Marcello Musto (Ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (Chapters 46 and 65).

https://www.bloomsburycollections.com/book/workers-unite-the-international-150-years-later/

Kristin Ross, Communal Luxury: The Political Imaginary of the Paris Commune, London: Verso, 2015.

Additional Materials:

Peter Watkins, La commune (Paris, 1871), France, 345 min.

Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3KIvQ1nUdIs&ab_channel=Chve

Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rI-UFKiOvg&ab_channel=Chve

Prosper Olivier Lissagaray, History of the Paris Commune of 1871 [1876], London: Verso.

https://www.marxists.org/history/france/archive/lissagaray/

Marcello Musto, “Introduction”, in Id. (Ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (Editor), London–New York: Bloomsbury, 2014, pp. 1-68.

https://www.bloomsburycollections.com/book/workers-unite-the-international-150-years-later/

Week 4 – 2 February: The Narodniks and Populism in Russia

Required Readings:

Vera Zasulich - Karl Marx, "Letters on Social Relations in Russia"

https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1881/zasulich/

Franco Venturi , Roots Of Revolution: A History of the Populist and Socialist Movements in Nineteenth Century Russia , New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1960, in particular chapters 7: "The Peasant Movement", 8: "The Student Movement", 9: "The First Groups", pp. 204-252, Chapter 18: "The Movement 'Go to the People'", pp. 469-506, Chapter 19: "The Working Class Movement", pp. 507-558.

https://ia800304.us.archive.org/33/items/rootsofrevolutio008262mbp/rootsofrevolutio008262mbp.pdf

Andrzey Walichi, The Controversy over Capitalism, Oxford: OUP, 1969.

Additional Readings:

Nikolai Chernyshevsky, What Is to Be Done?, Cornell: Cornell University Press , 1989.

Teodor Shanin (Ed.), Late Marx and the Russian Road, Marx and the ‘peripheries of capitalism’ , New Tork: Monthy Reivew Press, 1983.

Lenin, The Heritage We Renounce

https://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1897/dec/31c.htm

James H. Billington, Mikhailovsky and Russian populism , Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1958.

Richard Wortman, The crisis of Russian populism , London: CUP, 1967.

Arthur P. Mendel, Dilemmas of progress in tsarist Russia: Legal Marxism and legal Populism , Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1961.

Andrzej Walicki, A History of Russian Thought: From the Enlightenment to Marxism, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1979.

Week 5 – 9 February: Russian Revolution I: the Soviets

Required Readings:

Maurice Brinton, The Bolsheviks and Workers' Control: The State and Counter-Revolution

https://www.marxists.org/archive/brinton/1970/workers-control/

Rex A. Wade, The Russian Revolution, 1917, Cambridge: CUP, 2005, Chapter 4: "The Aspirations of Russian Society", pp. 88-129, Chapter 5 "The Peasants and the Purpose of Revolution", pp. 129-145.

Lenin, All the Power to the Soviets!

https://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1917/jul/18.htm

Additional Readings:

Victor Serge, Year One of the Russian Revolution, in particular Chapter 1: "From Serfdom to Proletarian Revolution", Chapter 2: "The Insurrection of 25 October 1917", and Chapter 3: "The Urban Middle Classes against the Proletariat".

https://www.marxists.org/archive/serge/1930/year-one/index.htm

Paul H. Avrich, "The Bolshevik Revolution and Workers' Control in Russian Industry", in Slavic Review, Vol. 22, No. 1 (Mar., 1963), pp. 47-63.

Lenin, State and Revolution (1918)

https://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1917/staterev/

Sheila Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution, 1917-1932, Oxford: OUP, 1984.

John Reed, Ten Days that Shook the World

https://www.marxists.org/archive/reed/1919/10days/10days/index.htm

Tamás Krausz, Reconstructing Lenin, New York: Monthly Review, 2015.

Week 6 – 16 February: Russian Revolution II: Workers' Control or Party-State Rule?

Required Readings:

Lynne Viola (Ed.), Contending with Stalinism: Soviet Power and Popular Resistance in the 1930s , Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2002, pp. 1-108.

Additional Readings:

E. H. Carr, The Bolshevik Revolution (3 voll.), New York: Penguin, 1950.

Ronald Suny, The Soviet Experiment, Oxford: OUP, 2011.

Paul Mattick, Workers’ Control (1967), Section 3.

https://www.marxists.org/archive/mattick-paul/1967/workers-control.htm

Paresh Chattopadhyay, 'The Failure of Twentieth-Century Socialism and Marx’s Continuing Relevance', Socialism and Democracy, Vol. 24, n. 3 (2010), pp. 23-45.

Week 7 – 2 March: Councils Movement

Required Readings:

Pierre Broué, The German Revolution, 1917-1923, London: Merlin Press, 2006, Chapter 1: 1-10, Chapter 7: pp. 89-110, Chapter 8: 129-155.

Gabriel Kuhn (Ed.), All the Power to the Councils: A Documentary History of the German Revolution of 1918-1919 , Oakland: PM Press, 2012, in particular: Ernst Daeumig, "The Council Idea and Its Realization", pp. 51-58.

https://libcom.org/files/Allpower%20to%20the%20councils.pdf

Rosa Luxemburg, The Mass Strike, the Political Party and the Trade Unions (1906) (sections 4 and 6-8).

https://www.marxists.org/archive/luxemburg/1906/mass-strike/

Antonio Gramsci, "The Turin factory council movement" (1921).

https://www.marxists.org/archive/gramsci/1921/03/turin_councils.htm

Additional Readings:

Ralf Hoffrogge, Working-Class Politics in the German Revolution, Leiden: Brill, 2014.

Gwyn A. Williams, Proletarian Order: Antonio Gramsci, Factory Councils and the Origins of Communism in Italy, 1911-1921 , London: PLuto Press, 1975.

Marcel van der Linden, "On Council Communism", in Historical Materialism, vol. 12 (2004), n. 4.

https://www.marxists.org/subject/left-wing/2004/council-communism.htm

Anton Pannekoek, Workers' Councils (1946)

https://www.marxists.org/archive/pannekoe/1947/workers-councils.htm

Rosa Luxemburg, "The Socialisation of Society" (1918).

https://www.marxists.org/archive/luxemburg/1918/12/20.htm

Lelio Basso, Rosa Luxemburg: A Reappraisal, London: Deutsch 1975.

Paul Mattick, Anti-Bolshevik Communism, London: Merlin 1978.

https://www.marxists.org/archive/mattick-paul/1978/introduction.htm

Week 8 – 9 March: Spanish Revolution

Required Readings:

Eddie Conlon, The Spanish Civil War: Anarchism in Action, Workers' Solidarity Movement, 1986 (extracts).

https://libcom.org/history/1936-1939-the-spanish-civil-war-and-revolution

Pierre Broue - Emile Temime, The Revolution and the Civil War in Spain , Chapter 4: "Pronunciamiento and Revolution", pp. 93-120, Chapter 5: "The Revolutionary Gains", pp. 121-149.

Deirdre Hogan, Industrial Collectivisation During the Spanish Revolution

http://struggle.ws/wsm/rbr/rbr7/spain.html

Lose Peirats, The CNT in the Spanish Revolution, Volume 1, Chapter 8: "Spain in flames".

https://libcom.org/files/The%20CNT%20in%20the%20Spanish%20Revoluti%20-%20Jose%20Peirats.pdf

Karl Korsch, Collectivization in Spain (1939)

https://www.marxists.org/archive/korsch/1939/collectivization.htm

Additional Materials:

Ken Loach, Land and Freedom, UK - Spain, 109 min.

https://vimeo.com/17190850

Gaston Leval, Collectives in the Spanish revolution

https://libcom.org/library/collectives-spanish-revolution-gaston-leval

Michael Seidman, Republic of Egos: A Social History of the Spanish Civil War

https://libcom.org/files/Republic_of_Egos.pdf

Lose Peirats, Anarchists In The Spanish Revolution

https://libcom.org/files/Peirats%20J.%20Anarchists%20in%20the%20Spanish%20Revolution.pdf

George Orwell, Homage to Catalonia

Week 9 – 16 March: Chinese Communist Revolution

Required Readings:

TBA

Additional Readings:

Edward Friedman, Backward Toward Revolution, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1974.

Jean Chesneaux, Peasant Revolts in China, 1840-1949, pp. 101-120, 150-166.

Harold R. Isaacs, The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution (1938).

https://www.marxists.org/history/etol/writers/isaacs/1938/tcr/

Week 10 – 23 March: Anti-colonial Movements: The Case of Algeria

Required Readings:

Alistair Horne, A savage war of peace: Algeria, 1954-1962 , London: Macmillan, 1977, Chapter 9: "The Battle of Algiers", pp. 183-207.

Joan Gillespie, Algeria: Rebellion and Revolution, Westport: Greenwood Press, 1960, Chapter 9: "The Revolutionary Years", pp. 112-179.

Franz Fanon, A Dying Colonialism, New York: Grove Press, 1959.

http://abahlali.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Frantz-Fanon-A-Dying-Colonialism.pdf

Additional Materials:

Gillo Pontecorvo, The Battle of Algiers, Italy - Algeria, 120 min.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-lWF100yTM&ab_channel=StephenBoyd

Ernesto Che Guevara, Message to the Tricontinental (1967)

Week 11 – 30 March: Paris 1968: We Want Everything!

Required Readings:

1968: - a chronology of events in France and internationally

https://libcom.org/history/articles/france-1968

Daniel Singer, Prelude to Revolution (1970), Cambridge: South End Press, pp. 115-151.

Vv. Aa., May-June 1968 - A Situation Lacking in Workers' Autonomy

https://libcom.org/library/may-june-1968-absence-workers-autonomy

Additional Materials:

Alain Schnapp - Pierre Vidal-Naquet, The French Student Uprising, November 1967-June 1968: An Analytical Record , Boston: Beacon Press, 1971, in particular pp. 147-240 and 325-372.

Paris 1968 posters

https://libcom.org/gallery/paris-68-posters

Christine Fauré, Mai 68, Paris: Gallimard, 1998.

Michael M. Seidman, The Imaginary Revolution: Parisian Students and Workers in 1968, New York: Berghahn Books, Chap. 1 "Sex, Drugs, and Revolution", pp. 17-52.

https://books.google.ca/books?id=3ZaXdwPyblcC&printsec=frontcover&hl=it&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

Obsolete communism: The left wing alternative - Daniel and Gabriel Cohn-Bendit

https://libcom.org/files/Obsolete%20Communism%20-%20The%20left-wing%20alternative%20-%20Daniel%20Cohn-Bendit%20&%20Gabriel%20Cohn-Bendit.pdf

Tom Nairn and Angelo Quattrocchi, The Beginning of the End: France, May 1968, London: Verso.

General Strike: France 1968 - A factory by factory account

https://libcom.org/library/general-strike-france-1968-factory-factory-account

M. Klimke - J. Scharloth (Eds.), 1968 in Europe: A History of Protest and Activism, 1956–1977, London: Palgrave, 2008.

Kristin Ross, May '68 and Its Afterlives, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

http://angg.twu.net/tmp/ross__may_68_and_its_afterlives.pdf

Tariq Ali - Susan Watkins (Eds), 1968: Marching in the Streets

Margaret Atack, May 68 in French Fiction & Film, Oxford: OUP, 1999.

Week 12 – 6 April: The Personal is Political: Women's Liberation

Required Readings:

Carol Giardina, Freedom for women: forging the Women's Liberation Movement, 1953-1970 , Gainesville, Fla.: University Press of Florida, 2010, in particular Chapter 9: "Making the Women's Liberation Movement", pp. 174-192.

https://www.library.yorku.ca/find/Record/3062725 [Electronic resource]

Another Reading TBA.

Carol Hanisch, "The Personal is Political" (1969)

http://www.carolhanisch.org/CHwritings/PIP.html

Additional Readings:

Judith Evans, Feminist Theory Today: an Introduction to Second-Wave Feminism, Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications, 1995.

Robin Morgan (ed.), Sisterhood Is Powerful: An Anthology of Writings from the Women's Liberation Movement.

Shulamith Firestone, The Dialectic of Sex: The Case for Feminist Revolution

Nancy Holmstrom, The Socialist Feminist Project: A Contemporary Reader in Theory and Politics, New York: Monthly Review Press 2002, (in particular: Nancy MacLean, "The Hidden History of Affirmative Action: Working Women’s Struggles in the 1970s and the Gender of Class").

Luce Irigaray, Speculum of the Other Woman [1974] (excerpts); and This Sex Which Is Not One [1977] (Chapter 8 "Women on the Market" and excerpts).

Z. Eisenstein (ed.), Capitalist Patriarchy and the Case for Socialist Feminism, New York: Monthly Review Press 1979.

Stephanie Gilmore (Ed.), Feminist coalitions: historical perspectives on second-wave feminism in the United States , Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2008.

Created: Tuesday, 10 January 2017 00:13
( 0 Votes ) 
Category: Undergraduate Courses Written by Marcello Musto

Additional info
  • University Name: York University

York University

Department of Sociology

Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies

GS/SOCI 4220 3.0 (W) - M


Social Movements: Theory and Practice

Winter 2017

Course Syllabus

Course Director: Marcello Musto

Class Time: Tuesday 14:30 - 17:30

Class Location: Ross Bldg. S 102

Office Hours: Tuesday 17:30 - 18:30

Office Location: Ross Bldg. N833A

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Unit Description


This course deals with the developments of some of the most significant international social movements from the end of Ancien Régime to the fall of Berlin Wall (1789-1989). These include social movements that were formed around the French Revolution, the Revolutions of 1848, the Paris Commune, the birth of Soviet Union, the Chinese Revolution, the anticolonialist movement, and the protests of 1968. These movements will be critically analysed, both in terms of history of ideas and of their major socio-political characteristics.

Course Requirements and Evaluation

Class Participation

30%

Presentation

20%

Final Exam

50%

Class Participation:

This course is taught in weekly seminars lasting 2 hours and 50 minutes. Attendance and informed participation at all class meetings is not only strongly recommended, but required. Students are expected to attend class regularly, complete the assignment readings on time and participate actively in class discussion. Participation will be marked for attendance and quality of participation.

Presentation:

Each class will begin with a student presentation (between 25 and 30 minutes) on the assigned readings. Presenters should provide a 2 page summary (by photocopy) of her/his presentation for other students.

A good presentation is very important to stimulate discussion. Therefore, please avoid just reading from a paper, and try to present ideas and raise questions for the engagement of others. Presentations should:

-give all the pertinent biographical information about the author(s) and the historical context in which the assigned texts were written;

-reconstruct the argument of the author(s), and provide an overview of the assigned readings;

-identify the key questions for discussion, and the controversies implied by the material;

-critically analyze the texts (for example: what are the limitations of the position expressed in the readings?);

-identify anything you found unclear or hard to understand;

-conclude with three discussion questions for the group to consider.

Final Exam :

A final exam will be held on April 6, at the regular class time and place. The exam will last 120 minutes and it will consist of answering to 6 questions (out of 9) drawn from the readings assigned during the course.

The first three questions will be related to French Revolution, Russian Revolution and 1968 Movement, while the last 3 questions (out of 6), to which students will have to respond, will be focused on the other readings (more detailed information about the exam and the kind of questions of the exam will be given during the course).

Note:

Mid-term class participation and presentation (if already done) marks will be available by email or by appointment the week of 16 February.

Schedule of Classes and Readings

Week 1 – 10 January: French Revolution

Recommended Readings:

Eric Hobsbawm, The Age of Revolution 1789-1848, Chapters 1, 2 and maps, pp. 7-52 and 309-320.

https://libcom.org/files/Eric%20Hobsbawm%20-%20Age%20Of%20Revolution%201789%20-1848.pdf

Week 2 – 17 January: From 1789 to the Revolutions of 1848

Required Readings:

George Rudé, The Crowd in the French Revolution, in particular Part III: "The Anatomy of the Revolutionary Crowd", pp. 178-239.

Additional Readings:

Carl Landauer, European Socialism, Chapter I: "The Three Anticapitalistic Movements", (sections 1-5), Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1959, pp. 21-59.

William Sewell, Work & Revolution in France, Cambridge: CUP, 1980, Chapter 9: "The July Revolution and the Emergence of Class Consciousness", pp. 194-218; and Chapter 11: "The Revolution of 1848", pp. 243-276.

Roger Magraw, "Socialism, Syndicalism and French Labour before 1914", in Dick Geary, Labour and Socialist Movements in Europe before 1914, New York: Berg, 1989, pp. 48-100.

George D. H. Cole's, A History of Socialist Thought, Vol. I (The Forerunners 1789-1850) , Chapter I: "The Great French Revolution and the Conspiracy of Gracchus Babeuf", pp. 11-22.

https://libcom.org/library/history-socialist-thought-volume-i-forerunners-1789-1850

Pamela Pilbeam, French Socialists before Marx: Workers, Women, and the Social Question in France . Teddington: Acumen 2000, in particular Chapter 8: "Worker Associations before 1848".

Eric Hazan, A History of the Barricade, London: Verso, 2015.

Week 3 – 24 January: Paris Commune

Required Readings:

Donny Gluckstein, The Paris Commune: A Revolution in Democracy, Chapter 1: "The Commune's Achievements", pp. 1-42.

https://books.google.ie/books?id=fGrR78ZkBJcC&printsec=frontcover&hl=it&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

Additional Materials:

Karl Marx, The Civil War in France, in Marcello Musto (Ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (Chapters 46 and 65).

https://www.bloomsburycollections.com/book/workers-unite-the-international-150-years-later/

Kristin Ross, Communal Luxury: The Political Imaginary of the Paris Commune, London: Verso, 2015.

Peter Watkins, La commune (Paris, 1871), France, 345 min.

Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3KIvQ1nUdIs&ab_channel=Chve

Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rI-UFKiOvg&ab_channel=Chve

Prosper Olivier Lissagaray, History of the Paris Commune of 1871 [1876], London: Verso.

https://www.marxists.org/history/france/archive/lissagaray/

Marcello Musto, “Introduction”, in Id. (Ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (Editor), London–New York: Bloomsbury, 2014, pp. 1-68.

https://www.bloomsburycollections.com/book/workers-unite-the-international-150-years-later/

Week 4 – 31 January: The Narodniks and Populism in Russia

Required Readings:

Franco Venturi , Roots Of Revolution: A History of the Populist and Socialist Movements in Nineteenth Century Russia , New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1960 (excerpts TBA).

https://ia800304.us.archive.org/33/items/rootsofrevolutio008262mbp/rootsofrevolutio008262mbp.pdf

Additional Readings:

Vera Zasulich - Karl Marx, "Letters on Social Relations in Russia"

https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1881/zasulich/

Andrzey Walichi, The Controversy over Capitalism, Oxford: OUP, 1969.

Nikolai Chernyshevsky, What Is to Be Done?, Cornell: Cornell University Press , 1989.

Teodor Shanin (Ed.), Late Marx and the Russian Road, Marx and the ‘peripheries of capitalism’ , New Tork: Monthy Reivew Press, 1983.

Lenin, The Heritage We Renounce

https://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1897/dec/31c.htm

James H. Billington, Mikhailovsky and Russian populism , Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1958.

Richard Wortman, The crisis of Russian populism , London: CUP, 1967.

Arthur P. Mendel, Dilemmas of progress in tsarist Russia: Legal Marxism and legal Populism , Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1961.

Andrzej Walicki, A History of Russian Thought: From the Enlightenment to Marxism, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1979.

Week 5 – 7 February: Russian Revolution I: the Soviets

Required Readings:

Rex A. Wade, The Russian Revolution, 1917, Cambridge: CUP, 2005, Chapter 4: "The Aspirations of Russian Society", pp. 88-129.

Additional Readings:

Rex A. Wade, The Russian Revolution, 1917, Cambridge: CUP, 2005, Chapter 5 "The Peasants and the Purpose of Revolution", pp. 129-145.

Victor Serge, Year One of the Russian Revolution, in particular Chapter 1: "From Serfdom to Proletarian Revolution", Chapter 2: "The Insurrection of 25 October 1917", and Chapter 3: "The Urban Middle Classes against the Proletariat".

https://www.marxists.org/archive/serge/1930/year-one/index.htm

Maurice Brinton, The Bolsheviks and Workers' Control: The State and Counter-Revolution

https://www.marxists.org/archive/brinton/1970/workers-control/

Lenin, All the Power to the Soviets!

https://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1917/jul/18.htm

Lenin, State and Revolution (1918)

https://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1917/staterev/

Sheila Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution, 1917-1932, Oxford: OUP, 1984.

John Reed, Ten Days that Shook the World

https://www.marxists.org/archive/reed/1919/10days/10days/index.htm

Tamás Krausz, Reconstructing Lenin, New York: Monthly Review, 2015.

Week 6 – 14 February: Russian Revolution II: Workers' Control or Party-State Rule?

Required Readings:

Lynne Viola (Ed.), Contending with Stalinism: Soviet Power and Popular Resistance in the 1930s , Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2002, pp. 1-43.

Additional Readings:

E. H. Carr, The Bolshevik Revolution (3 voll.), New York: Penguin, 1950.

Ronald Suny, The Soviet Experiment, Oxford: OUP, 2011.

Paul Mattick, Workers’ Control (1967), Section 3.

https://www.marxists.org/archive/mattick-paul/1967/workers-control.htm

Paresh Chattopadhyay, 'The Failure of Twentieth-Century Socialism and Marx’s Continuing Relevance', Socialism and Democracy, Vol. 24, n. 3 (2010), pp. 23-45.

Week 7 – 28 February: Councils Movement

Required Readings:

Pierre Broué, The German Revolution, 1917-1923, London: Merlin Press, 2006, Chapter 1: 1-10, Chapter 7: pp. 89-110, Chapter 8: 129-155.

Additional Readings:

Gabriel Kuhn (Ed.), All the Power to the Councils: A Documentary History of the German Revolution of 1918-1919 , Oakland: PM Press, 2012, in particular: Ernst Daeumig, "The Council Idea and Its Realization", pp. 51-58.

https://libcom.org/files/Allpower%20to%20the%20councils.pdf

Rosa Luxemburg, The Mass Strike, the Political Party and the Trade Unions (1906) (sections 4 and 6-8).

https://www.marxists.org/archive/luxemburg/1906/mass-strike/

Antonio Gramsci, "The Turin factory council movement" (1921).

https://www.marxists.org/archive/gramsci/1921/03/turin_councils.htm

Ralf Hoffrogge, Working-Class Politics in the German Revolution, Leiden: Brill, 2014.

Gwyn A. Williams, Proletarian Order: Antonio Gramsci, Factory Councils and the Origins of Communism in Italy, 1911-1921 , London: PLuto Press, 1975.

Marcel van der Linden, "On Council Communism", in Historical Materialism, vol. 12 (2004), n. 4.

https://www.marxists.org/subject/left-wing/2004/council-communism.htm

Anton Pannekoek, Workers' Councils (1946)

https://www.marxists.org/archive/pannekoe/1947/workers-councils.htm

Rosa Luxemburg, "The Socialisation of Society" (1918).

https://www.marxists.org/archive/luxemburg/1918/12/20.htm

Lelio Basso, Rosa Luxemburg: A Reappraisal, London: Deutsch 1975.

Paul Mattick, Anti-Bolshevik Communism, London: Merlin 1978.

https://www.marxists.org/archive/mattick-paul/1978/introduction.htm

Week 8 – 7 March: Spanish Revolution

Required Readings:

Eddie Conlon, The Spanish Civil War: Anarchism in Action, Workers' Solidarity Movement, 1986 (extracts).

https://libcom.org/history/1936-1939-the-spanish-civil-war-and-revolution

Deirdre Hogan, Industrial Collectivisation during the Spanish Revolution

http://struggle.ws/wsm/rbr/rbr7/spain.html

Additional Materials:

Ken Loach, Land and Freedom, UK - Spain, 109 min.

https://vimeo.com/17190850

Pierre Broue - Emile Temime, The Revolution and the Civil War in Spain , Chapter 4: "Pronunciamiento and Revolution", pp. 93-120, Chapter 5: "The Revolutionary Gains", pp. 121-149.

Lose Peirats, The CNT in the Spanish Revolution, Volume 1, Chapter 8: "Spain in flames".

https://libcom.org/files/The%20CNT%20in%20the%20Spanish%20Revoluti%20-%20Jose%20Peirats.pdf

Karl Korsch, Collectivization in Spain (1939)

https://www.marxists.org/archive/korsch/1939/collectivization.htm

Gaston Leval, Collectives in the Spanish revolution

https://libcom.org/library/collectives-spanish-revolution-gaston-leval

Michael Seidman, Republic of Egos: A Social History of the Spanish Civil War

https://libcom.org/files/Republic_of_Egos.pdf

Lose Peirats, Anarchists In The Spanish Revolution

https://libcom.org/files/Peirats%20J.%20Anarchists%20in%20the%20Spanish%20Revolution.pdf

George Orwell, Homage to Catalonia

Week 9 – 14 March: Chinese Communist Revolution

Required Readings:

TBA

Additional Readings:

Edward Friedman, Backward Toward Revolution, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1974.

Jean Chesneaux, Peasant Revolts in China, 1840-1949, pp. 101-120, 150-166.

Harold R. Isaacs, The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution (1938).

https://www.marxists.org/history/etol/writers/isaacs/1938/tcr/

Week 10 – 21 March: Anti-colonial Movements: The Case of Algeria

Required Readings:

Alistair Horne, A savage war of peace: Algeria, 1954-1962 , London: Macmillan, 1977 (extracts TBA).

Additional Materials:

Gillo Pontecorvo, The Battle of Algiers, Italy - Algeria, 120 min.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-lWF100yTM&ab_channel=StephenBoyd

Joan Gillespie, Algeria: Rebellion and Revolution, Westport: Greenwood Press, 1960, Chapter 9: "The Revolutionary Years", pp. 112-179.

Franz Fanon, A Dying Colonialism, New York: Grove Press, 1959.

http://abahlali.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Frantz-Fanon-A-Dying-Colonialism.pdf

Ernesto Che Guevara, Message to the Tricontinental (1967)

Week 11 – 28 March: Paris 1968: We Want Everything!

Required Readings:

1968: - a chronology of events in France and internationally

https://libcom.org/history/articles/france-1968

Daniel Singer, Prelude to Revolution (1970), Cambridge: South End Press, pp. 115-151.

Additional Materials:

Alain Schnapp - Pierre Vidal-Naquet, The French Student Uprising, November 1967-June 1968: An Analytical Record , Boston: Beacon Press, 1971, in particular pp. 147-240 and 325-372.

Paris 1968 posters

https://libcom.org/gallery/paris-68-posters

Vv. Aa., May-June 1968 - A Situation Lacking in Workers' Autonomy

https://libcom.org/library/may-june-1968-absence-workers-autonomy

Christine Fauré, Mai 68, Paris: Gallimard, 1998.

Michael M. Seidman, The Imaginary Revolution: Parisian Students and Workers in 1968, New York: Berghahn Books, Chap. 1 "Sex, Drugs, and Revolution", pp. 17-52.

https://books.google.ca/books?id=3ZaXdwPyblcC&printsec=frontcover&hl=it&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

Obsolete communism: The left wing alternative - Daniel and Gabriel Cohn-Bendit

https://libcom.org/files/Obsolete%20Communism%20-%20The%20left-wing%20alternative%20-%20Daniel%20Cohn-Bendit%20&%20Gabriel%20Cohn-Bendit.pdf

Tom Nairn and Angelo Quattrocchi, The Beginning of the End: France, May 1968, London: Verso.

General Strike: France 1968 - A factory by factory account

https://libcom.org/library/general-strike-france-1968-factory-factory-account

M. Klimke - J. Scharloth (Eds.), 1968 in Europe: A History of Protest and Activism, 1956–1977, London: Palgrave, 2008.

Kristin Ross, May '68 and Its Afterlives, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

http://angg.twu.net/tmp/ross__may_68_and_its_afterlives.pdf

Tariq Ali - Susan Watkins (Eds), 1968: Marching in the Streets

Margaret Atack, May 68 in French Fiction & Film, Oxford: OUP, 1999.

Week 12 – 4 April: Final Exam

Created: Thursday, 15 September 2016 00:19
( 0 Votes ) 
Category: Undergraduate Courses Written by Marcello Musto

Additional info
  • University Name: York University

York University

Department of Sociology

Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies

AP/SOCI 2040 6.0 A (Y) - Section B

Sociological Theory

Fall 2015 - Winter 2016

Course Director: Marcello Musto

Class Time: Tuesday 14:30 - 16:30

Class Location: TEL 0014

Office Location: 134 Founders College

Office Hours: Thursday 17:30 - 18:30

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Teaching Assistants: Rana Sukarieh - Behzad Mohammadi

Course Syllabus


This course deals with the development of sociological theory from the major foundational thinkers of the 19th and early 20 th century, through recent approaches informed by a variety of critical perspectives. Much of classical sociological theory was focussed upon growing awareness of society, as such, being the subject of profound change. Central questions addressed by its main authors were “What is the nature of the society emerging in (and from) 19th century Europe?” and “What is its significance with respect to the development of humanity?” Difference of opinion and profound debate have been characteristic of sociological theory, and have widely been recognized as contributing to its development. Since the last decades of the 20 th century, the enduring debates have been compounded, without being entirely superseded, by new critical approaches that have sought new insights not only into the nature of society and social change, but of the ways in which knowledge in, and of, society are constructed.

The first part of the course will focus on the principal authors, texts and debates of the classical era of sociology. A wide range of thinkers helped establish the context for, built upon the insights of, filled the gaps between, and discerned alternatives to, the often conflicting ideas of the recognized giants of classical social theory (among others Karl Marx, Émile Durkheim and Max Weber).

The second part of the course will focus on the contributions and controversies that have followed from broad recognition of sociology as a distinct intellectual discipline, coupled with recurrent efforts to shed light on its most basic theoretical underpinnings. These additions to the corpus of sociological theory have extended its critical range, and multiplied its analytical power and complexity.

A primary goal of this course is to illuminate the role of critical analysis in the expansion and deepening of social knowledge, insisting upon the need for every person to become informed by confronting ideas in debate, and then to arrive at a personal position through a critical evaluation of alternatives.

Course Requirements

Class and Tutorial Participation:

This course is taught in 24 weekly lectures - lasting 1 hour and 50 minutes - and tutorials lasting 50 minutes. Participation will be marked on the basis of a combination of attendance to lectures and tutorials.

Class participation: attendance and informed participation at all class meetings is not only strongly recommended, but required. Students are expected to attend class regularly, complete the assigned readings on time, and participate actively.

Tutorial participation: students are required to come prepared to tutorials, with a one page abstract (around 500 words) about the readings, which may include reflections on the main concepts included in the texts, questions about them, problems encountered with the readings (terminology, historical context, etc.), critical comparison with contemporary issues, etc. The Teaching Assistants will lead the discussion among the students and will also respond to their questions.

Please note that food and the use of cell phone in classroom will not be allowed.

Midterm Exams:

Two midterm exams will be held on October 27, 2015 and on February 23, 2016, at the regular class time and place. The exam will last 90 minutes and it will consist of answering to 3 questions drawn from the readings assigned until that date. At the fall mid-term exam students will be required to respond to questions concerning the readings from week 1 to week 6, while at the winter mid-term exam students will have to respond to questions related to the readings of the period lasting weeks 8 to week 18.

Midterm marks will be available by email (please contact your Teaching Assistant) before November 7, 2014, for the Fall term, and February 6, 2015, for the Winter term.

Final Paper :

The final paper will be divided in two parts: 1) Abstract of the Readings; and 2) Final Essay.

Abstract of the Readings: students should deliver 3 abstracts (of about 500 words each - total of 1.500 words) of the readings from week 20 to week 24.

Final Essay: approximately 3.000 - 3.500 words, including footnotes and a final bibliography (roughly 10 pages double-spaced in 12 pt. 'Times New Roman' font). This essay has to be clearly structured (divided into at least 3 sections), and written with rigorous reference to supporting evidence; generally, 1-2 references to books or articles per page is a good rule of thumb. These sources may include assigned readings, but there must also be evidence of further research.

Students are free to propose their own final paper topic, but it has to be related to the authors and/or the writings read during the course (papers on the the sociological theory as a whole of one or more authors, or offering comparison among different sociological conceptions, are the most welcome). Students are encouraged to discuss the topic of the final essay with the Teaching Assistants.

Access to Course Readings:

Many of the required readings are classical of sociological thought and are, therefore, available on-line (more information will be given in class).

Eric J. Hobsbawm, The Age of Revolution 1789-1848, (Mentor 1962) is also available for free at: https://libcom.org/files/Eric%20Hobsbawm%20-%20Age%20Of%20Revolution%201789%20-1848.pdf

All required and additional readings indicated in the syllabus are on two hours reserve at Scott library. The following textbooks, which you may find useful to consult during the year, have been also placed on reserve at Scott library:

Applerouth, Scott A., and Laura Desfor Edles, Classical and Contemporary Sociological Theory: Text and Readings, Thousand Oaks: Pine Forge Press, 2012.

Dillon, Michelle, Introduction to Sociological Theory: Theorists, Concepts, and their Applicability to the Twenty-First Century, Malden: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.

Farganis, James, Readings in Social Theory: The Classical Tradition to Post-Modernism, Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2013.

Kivisto, Peter, Social Theory: Roots and Branches. 5 th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.

Ritzer, George, and Jeff Stepnisky, Sociological Theory. 9 th ed. Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2013.

Zeitlin, Irving M., Ideology and the Development of Sociological Theory. 7th ed. Upper Saddle River: Prentice-Hall, 2000.

Course Evaluation

Class and Tutorial Participation

30%

First Midterm Exam (Fall)

20%

Second Midterm Exam (Winter)

20%

Final Paper

30%

Schedule of Classes and Readings

Part I: Classics

Week 1 – 15 Sept: Introduction and Overview

Required Readings:

Eric Hobsbawm, The Age of Revolution 1789-1848, Chap. 1, 2 and maps, pp. 7-52 and 363-374.

Week 2 – 22 Sept: Positivism and the Birth of Sociology

Required Readings:

Auguste Comte, A general View of Positivism [1848] (excertps)

Additional Readings:

Mary Pickering, Auguste Comte: An Intellectual Biography (Vol. 1), Cambridge University Press, 1993.

Week 3 – 29 Sept: Saint-Simonism

Required Readings:

Claude de Saint-Simon, The Organizer [1819], Industrial System [1821] and On Social Organization [1825]

Excerpts taken from the following volumes:

Saint-Simon, Henri. Henri Saint-Simon (1760-1825): Selected writings on science, industry, and social organization. Croom Helm. 1975.

Comte de saint-Simon (ed. Markham), Henri Comte de Saint-Simon 1760-1825 Selected Writings. Blackwell Oxford, 1952.

Additional Readings:

Ghita Ionescu, Introduction, in Id. (ed.), The Political Thought of Saint-Simon, Cambridge University Press 1976.

OK Week 4 – 6 Oct: Liberalism

Required Readings:

Jeremy Bentham,Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation, Chapter I: “Of the Principle of Utility” and Chapter III: “Of the Four Sanctions or Sources of Pain and Pleasure”.

John Stuart Mill, Principles Of Political Economy, Book II, chapter I: "On Property".

Additional Readings:

Stefan Collini, Liberalism and Sociology, Cambridge University Press, 1979.

OK Week 5 – 13 Oct: Tocqueville

Required Readings:

Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America [1835 - 1840] (excerpts).

Additional Readings:

Cheryl Welch, De Tocqueville, Oxford University Press, 2001.

Week 6 – 20 Oct: Anti-capitalism

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, excerpts from the Manifesto of theCommust Party [1848], the Grundrisse [1857-58] and Capital, vol. I [1867].

Additional Readings:

Maximilien Rubel – Margaret Manale, Marx Without Myth: A Chronological Study of his Life and Work, Harper & Row, 1975.

Week 7 – 27 Oct: First Mid-Term Exam

Week 8 – 3 Nov: Social Darwinism

Required Readings:

Herbert Spencer, The Man versus the State [1884] (excertps)

Additional Readings:

John Offer (ed.), Herbert Spencer: Critical Assessments (4 voll.), Routledge, 2000.

Week 9 – 10 Nov: Durkheim

Required Readings:

Emile Durkheim, excerpts from The Division of Labour in Society [1893] and other minor writings.

Excerpts taken from the following edition:

Emile Durkheim, Selected Writings, (ed. by Giddens).

Additional Readings:

Anthony Giddens, Durkheim, ‪Harvester, 1978.

Week 10 – 17 Nov: Veblen’s Institutionalism

Required Readings:

Thorstein Veblen, Theory of the Leisure Class [1899] (excerpts)

Additional Readings:

Stephen Edgell, Veblen in Perspective: His Life and Thought, M.E. Sharpe, 2001.

Week 11 – 24 Nov: Weber
 

Required Readings:

Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism [1904-05] (excerpts)

Additional Readings:

Joachim Radkau, Max Weber: a Biography, Polity, 2009.

Week 12 – 1 Dec: Social Interactionism

Required Readings:

Georg Simmel, excerpts from The Philosophy of Money [1907] and Sociology [1908].

Excerpts taken from the following volume:

Georg Simmel (ed. by Levine), On Individuality and Social Forms, University of Chicago Press, 1971.

Additional Readings:

Norman Levine, Introduction, in Id. (ed.), Georg Simmel, On Individuality and Social Forms, University of Chicago Press, 1971.

Part II: Contemporary Developments

Week 13 – 5 Jan: Elite Theory

Required Readings:

Vilfredo Pareto, The Mind and Society [1916] (excerpts from volume IV: ‘The General Form of Society’).

Additional Readings:

Raymond Aron, Main Currents in Sociological Thought: Durkheim, Pareto, Weber – Vol. 2 , Basic Books 1967.

Week 14 – 12 Jan: Cultural Hegemony

Required Readings:

Antonio Gramsci, Prison Notebooks [1929-35] (excerpts)

Additional Readings:

Joseph Buttigieg, Introduction, in Id. (ed.), Antonio Gramsci, Prison Notebooks, Columbia University Press, 1992.

Week 15 – 19 Jan: Symbolic Interactionism

Required Readings:

George Herbert Mead, Mind, Self and Society [1934] (excerpts from chapter IV ‘Society’)

Additional Readings:

Mitchell Aboulafia (ed.), Philosophy, Social Theory, and the Thought of George Herbert Mead, SUNY, 1991.

Week 16 – 26 Jan: Action Theory

Required Readings:

Talcott Parsons, The Structure of Social Action [1937] (Excerpts from Part I ‘The Positivistic Theory of Action’ and Part IV ‘Conclusion’)

Additional Readings:

Hamilton Peter, Talcott Parsons, Horwood, 1983.

Week 17 – 2 Feb: The Sociological Imagination

Required Readings:

Charles Wright Mills, White Collar [1951] (excerpts)

Additional Readings:

John Eldridge, C. Wright Mills, Horwood, 1983.

Week 18 – 9 Feb: The Frankfurt School

Required Readings:

Selections of writings from Max Horkheimer, Theodor W. Adorno and other authors (TBA).

Excerpts taken from the following volume:

Andrew Arato, and Eike Gebhardt (Eds.), The Essential Frankfurt School Reader, Continuum, 1982.

Additional Readings

Jay Bernstein (Ed.), The Frankfurt School: Critical Assessments (6 voll.), Routledge, 1994.

Week 19 – 23 Feb: Second Mid-Term Exam

Week 20 – 1 Mar: Black Reconstruction

Required Readings:

William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, excerpts (TBA) from various writings [1935 and others].

Malcolm X, excerpts from The Last Speeches and other writings.

Additional Readings:

David Levering Lewis, W. E. B. Du Bois: The Fight for Equality and the American Century 1919–1963 , Owl Books 2001

Manning Marable, Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention , Penguin 2011.

Week 21 – 8 Mar: Feminist Critique

Required Readings:

Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex [1949] (excerpts)

Additional Readings:

D. Bair, Introduction to Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex, Vintage, 1989.

Week 22 – 15 Mar: Biopolitics

Required Readings:

Michel Foucault, The Birth of Biopolitics [1978–1979] (excerpts)

Additional Readings:

Gary Gutting, Foucault: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford 2005.

Week 23 – 22 Mar: Subalternity and Post-colonialism

Required Readings:

Franz Fanon, excerpts from The Wretched of the Earth [1961]

Edward W. Said, Orientalism [1978] (Introduction)

Additional Readings:

Conor McCarthy, The Cambridge Introduction to Edward Said, Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Week 24 – 29 Mar: The Critique of the Spectacle and Consumer Society

Required Readings:

Guy Debord, The Society of the Spectacle [1967] (chapters 1-53).

Jean Baudrillard, The Consumer Society [1974] (Part I: chapters I-III; Part II: chapter I; Part III: Conclusion) and other writings (TBA).

Additional Readings:

Anselm Jappe, Guy Debord, University of California Press, 1999.

Douglas Kellner, Jean Baudrillard: From Marxism to Postmodernism and Beyond, Stanford University Press, 1989.

Created: Thursday, 07 January 2016 23:59
( 0 Votes ) 
Category: Graduate Courses Written by Marcello Musto

Additional info
  • University Name: York University

York University

Department of Sociology

Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies

GS/SOCI 6190 3.0 (W) - M

Selected Topics in

Classical and Contemporary Theory

Winter 2016

Course Syllabus

Course Director: Marcello Musto

Class Time: Thursday 11:30 - 14:30

Class Location: Itinerant

Office Location: Ross Bldg. N833A

Office Hours: Tuesday 17:00 - 18:00 (or by appointment)

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Unit Description



This course deals with the development of sociological theory in the major foundational thinkers of the 19th and early 20th century. Much of classical sociological theory was focussed upon growing awareness of society, as such, being the subject of profound change. Central questions addressed by its main authors were “What is the nature of the society emerging in 19th century Europe?” and “What is its significance with respect to the development of humanity?” Differences of opinion and profound debate have been characteristic of sociological theory, and have widely been recognized as contributing to its development.

Course Requirements

Class Participation:

This course is taught in weekly seminars. Attendance is strongly recommended and students are expected to participate actively in class discussion.

Presentation:

Classes will begin with a student presentation of 30 to 40 minutes. If possible, avoid just reading a paper aloud and try get your colleagues involved.

Each student has to meet with the course director the week before her/his presentation (or two weeks before, if necessary). During the conversation with the course director you will agree upon the main points of the presentation, therefore please come prepared to the meeting, with at least a list of main topics you would like to cover.

Presentations will be an essential part of our seminar. You will orientate the discussion toward them and will provide to your colleagues more extended insights concerning the author(s) and the theories of the week. That will be possible on the basis of the additional readings already indicated in the syllabus and/or of further texts that will be suggested by the course director.

In your presentation, you should avoid devoting too much time to the assigned readings. You will only highlight their main points (in 5 to 10 min.) and pose some open questions (at least 3/4) for the debate - to which you will respond in the end, expressing your own point of view.

The most important part of the presentation (10 to 15 min.) should be dedicated to an exposition of the vision of society conceived by the author you are presenting, and in particular her/his conception of its economic, political and social organization.

The other main issues on which to concentrate on are: the socio-historical context in which the author(s) developed her/his ideas (5 min.), her/his intellectual biography (5 min.), philological information about the writings we have been reading (2 min), and, finally, the subsequent reception and dissemination of her/his ideas (5 min.).

In the second part of each class there will also be a 10 minutes contribution from a discussant. She/he should call the attention of other students to a few particular aspects of the work of the author in question, e.g., a particular concept, the reception of her/his work in a specific country, period or school of thought, etc.

The presenter and the discussant should cooperate before class, in order to avoid overlapping with the questions they will pose and with the problematics through which they will stimulate discussion.

Final Paper Proposal:

Students are free to propose their own final paper topic, but it must be related to one or more authors, as well as key issues, discussed during the seminar. The final paper proposal should be 3-4 pages (1.500 to 2.000 words) and include the following information:

- indication of the tentative title and of the sections in which the writing will be divided;

- preliminary outline of the text;

- 5 keywords concerning the themes and the concepts to be addressed;

- a bibliography of at least 10 sources consulted;

Final paper proposals will be due, in hard copy and by email, on March 3.

Please note that you cannot write the final paper on the same author(s) you have done your presentation. Exceptions are possible, but must be discussed in advance.

Final Paper:

The Final Paper, approved through the Final Paper Proposal, will be due in hard copy and by email no later than May 9. It should:

- be a maximum of 6.000 words, including notes and final references;

- be clearly structured and divided into at least 3 or 4 sections;

- have references from hard copy books, with the indication of page numbers (no references from the internet).

Course Evaluation

Class Participation

20%

Presentation

20%

Final Paper Proposal

10%

Final Paper

50%

Schedule of Classes and Readings

Week 1 – 7 January: Industrialism, Positivism and the Birth of Sociology

Required Readings:

Eric Hobsbawm, The Age of Revolution 1789-1848, Chapters 1, 2 and maps, pp. 7-52 and 363-374.

https://libcom.org/files/Eric%20Hobsbawm%20-%20Age%20Of%20Revolution%201789%20-1848.pdf

George D. H. Cole's, A History of Socialist Thought, Vol. I (The Forerunners 1789-1850) , London: Macmillan & Co. 1953, Chapter IV: "Saint-Simon", pp. 37-50.

https://libcom.org/files/A%20History%20of%20Socialist%20Thought%20Volume%201.pdf

Claude de Saint-Simon, The Organizer [1819]; Industrial System [1821]; and On Social Organization [1825] (excerpts)

https://www.docdroid.net/jLwZfPK/saint-simon.pdf.html

Michel Bourdeau, "Auguste Comte", in Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/comte/

Auguste Comte, System of Positive Polity [1851-4], vol. I, chap. III: "Action of Positivism upon Working Classes", pp. 101-163 (in particular 101-135); vol. II, chap. V: " The Positive theory of the Social Organism", pp. 221-275 (in particular 221-227 and 242-253); and vol. I: "Letter on Social Commemoration, Philosophically Considered, Composed for Madame Clotilde de Vaux on the Occasion of her Birthday", pp. 613-618.

https://www.docdroid.net/d2a58W3/comte-1-vol-1-chap-iii.pdf.html

https://www.docdroid.net/GtKQ1JO/comte-2-vol-2-chap-v.pdf.html

http://solomon.soth.alexanderstreet.com/cgi-bin/asp/philo/soth/getdoc.pl?S10019067-D000012.002

Additional Readings:

Pierre Ansart, Saint-Simon , Paris: Presses Universitaires de France 1969.

Pierre Ansart, Sociologie de Saint-Simon , Paris: Presses Universitaires de France 1970.

George Iggers, "Elements of a Sociology of Ideas in the Saint-Simonian Philosophy of History", in Sociological Quarterly, vol. 1 (1960).

Mary Pickering, Auguste Comte: An Intellectual Biography, 3 voll., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1993-2009.

Week 2 – 14 January: Utopian Sociology

Required Readings:

Gregory Claeys, “Non-Marxian Socialism 1815-1914", in Gareth Stedman Jones - Gregory Claeys, The Cambridge History of Nineteenth-Century Political History, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1979, Chapter 16, sections 1-5, pp. 521-542.

Gregory Claeys, “Socialism and Utopia”, in Roland Schaer, Gregory Claeys, and Lyman Tower Sargent (eds), Utopia : The Search for the Ideal Society in the Western World, New York: The New York Public Library - Oxford University Press 2000, pp. 206–40.

George D. H. Cole's, A History of Socialist Thought, Vol. I (The Forerunners 1789-1850) , Chapter VI: 'Fourier and Fourierism', pp. 62-74.

Charles Fourier, Theory of the Four Movements [1808];The New Industrial Wolrd [1830]; and The Phalanx [posthumous 1841-45]; and other minor writings (excerpts).

Leslie Goldstein, "Early Feminist Themes in French Utopian Socialism: The Saint-Simonian and Fourier", in Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 35 (1974).

Additional Readings:

Carl Landauer, European Socialism, Chapter I: "The Three Anticapitalistic Movement", (sections 1-5), Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1959, pp. 21-59.

Barbara Goodwin, Social Science and Utopia: Nineteenth-Century Models of Social Harmony , Hassockes: Harvester Press 1978.

Jonathan Beecher, Charles Fourier: the Visionary and His World, Berkeley: University of California Press 1986.

N. V. Riasanovsky, The Teaching of Charles Fourier, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1969.

Pamela Pilbeam, French Socialists before Marx: Workers, Women, and the Social Question in France . Teddington: Acumen 2000.

Week 3 – 21 January: Liberalism

Required Readings:

Selection of texts from the writings of Adam Smith, John Stuart Mill, and others (TBA).

Additional Readings:

TBA

Week 4 – 28 January: Anti-capitalism (Politics)

Required Readings:

Eric Hobsbawm, How to Change the World: Tales of Marx and Marxism, Chapter 2: "Marx, Engels and Pre-Marxian Socialism", London/New York: Little, Brown 2010.

Karl Marx, Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844 [1844], Manifesto of the Commust Party [1848] (section III), "Wage Labour and Capital" [1849], and other minor writings, pp. 83-121, 262-70, 273-96, 362-69.

https://wiki.zirve.edu.tr/sandbox/groups/economicsandadministrativesciences/wiki/ad713/attachments/1a247/Karl_Marx__Selected_Writings.pdf?sessionID=8940d4002f706e131a7b4041f136555e3b9837d4

Karl Marx, Resolutions of the International Working Men's Association (Nr. 2, 7, 12, 34, 44, 46, 65, 68, 71, 72, 74 and 75) [1864-72]; and other writings (excerpts).

https://www.bloomsburycollections.com/book/workers-unite-the-international-150-years-later/

Additional Readings:

Maximilien Rubel – Margaret Manale, Marx Without Myth: A Chronological Study of his Life and Work, New York: Harper & Row, 1975.

Joseph O'Malley and Keith Algozin (eds), Rubel on Karl Marx: Five Essays, Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press, 1981.

Marcello Musto, “Introduction”, in Id. (Ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (Editor), London–New York: Bloomsbury, 2014, pp. 1-68.

John Bellamy Foster, Marx's Ecology, New York: Monthly Review Press 2000.

Week 5 – 4 February: Anti-capitalism (Political Economy)

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, Grundrisse [1857-58]; Capital, vol. I [1867] (sections 3, 6, 10-13); "Results of the Immediate Process of Production"; "On Bakunin's Sattism and Anarchy", Critique of the Gotha Programme, and other writings (excerpts), pp. 373-430, 452-525 (but only the sections indicated above), 547-561, 606-28.

Additional Readings:

Paresh Chattopadhyay, 'The Failure of Twentieth-Century Socialism and Marx’s Continuing Relevance', Socialism and Democracy, Vol. 24, n. 3 (2010), pp. 23-45.

Paresh Chattopadhyay, 'Passage to Socialism: The Dialectic of Progress in Marx', Historical Materialism, Vol. 14, n.3 (2006), pp. 45-84.

Roman Rosdolsky, The Making of Marx’s Capital, London: Pluto 1977 (Chapters XXVIII and XXIX).

Michael Lebowitz, Beyond Capital, Basingstoke: Palgrave 2003, pp. 27-50

Kevin Anderson, Marx at the Margins, Chicago: University of Chicago Press 2010.

Bertell Ollman (et al.), Market Socialism: The Debate Among Socialist, London: Routledge 1998.

Week 6 – 11 February: Structural functionalism

Required Readings:

Emile Durkheim, Socialism and Saint-Simon [posthumous 1928], Chapters 1, 2, 7-9, 10 and 12; Lectures on Sociology, and the "Preface" to the second edition of The Division of Labour in Society.

http://14.139.206.50:8080/jspui/bitstream/1/1966/1/Durkheim,%20Emile%20-%20Socialism%20and%20Saint%20Simon.pdf

http://14.139.206.50:8080/jspui/bitstream/1/1970/1/Durkheim,%20Emile%20-%20The%20Division%20of%20Labour%20in%20Society.pdf

Additional Readings:

Steven Lukes, Émile Durkheim: His Life and Works. Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1973.

Marcel Fournier, Emile Durkheim 1858-1917. Paris: Fayard, 2007.

Stephen Turner (ed.), Emile Durkheim: Sociologist and Moralist, New York: Rutledge, 1993.

Susan Stedman-Jones, Durkheim Reconsidered, Cambridge: Polity Press, 2001.

Kenneth Thompson, Emile Durkheim. London: Routledge, 1982.

Anthony Giddens, Durkheim, ‪London: Harvester, 1978.

Warren Schmaus, Rethinking Durkheim and his Tradition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.

Week 7 – 3 March: Anarchism

Required Readings:

Peter Kropotkin, Anarchism [1910]; and The Conquest of Bread [1892].

http://dwardmac.pitzer.edu/Anarchist_Archives/kropotkin/britanniaanarchy.html

http://dwardmac.pitzer.edu/Anarchist_Archives/kropotkin/conquest/toc.html

Additional Readings:

George Woodcock - Ivan Avakumovic, The Anarchist Prince: A Biographical Study of Peter Kropotkin, London/New York: Boardman & Co 1950.

Caroline Cahm, Kropotkin and the Rise of Revolutionary Anarchism 1872–1886, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1989.

https://libcom.org/files/cahm-kropotkin_and_the_rise_of_revolutionary_anarchism_1872-1886.pdf

Brian Morris, Kropotkin: The Politics of Community, Amherst: Humanity Books 2004.

Week 8 – 10 March: On the Other Side of the Atlantic: Critical Sociology in the USA

Required Readings:

Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America [1835 - 1840] (excerpts).

Thorstein Veblen, Theory of the Leisure Class [1899] (excerpts).

Charles Wright Mills, White Collar [1951] (excerpts).

Additional Readings:

Cheryl Welch, De Tocqueville, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001.

Stephen Edgell, Veblen in Perspective: His Life and Thought, New York: M.E. Sharpe, 2001.

John Eldridge, C. Wright Mills, London: Horwood, 1983.

Week 9 – 17 March: Rational Capitalism

Required Readings:

Max Weber, Economy and Society [posthumous 1922] (excerpts) and "Socialism" [1918], in Peter Lassman - Ronald Speirs (eds), Max Weber: Political Writings, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

Additional Readings:

Joachim Radkau, Max Weber: a Biography, London: Polity, 2009.

Charles Camic, Philip Gorski and David Trubek (eds.), Max Weber’s Economy and Society: A Critical Companion, Stanford University Press 2005.

Collins, Randall, “Weber and the Sociology of Revolution”, Journal of Classical Sociology, vol. 1 (2001), No. 2, pp. 171-194.

Bryan S. Turner, Max Weber: From History to Modernity, London: Routledge 1993.

Reinhard Bendix, Max Weber: An Intellectual Portrait, Berkeley: University of California Press 1978.

Week 10 – 24 March: Heterodox Communisms

Required Readings:

Marcel van der Linden, "On Council Communism", in Historical Materialism, vol. 12 (2004), n. 4.

https://libcom.org/files/Council%20communism.pdf

Rosa Luxemburg, Reform or Revolution [1900] (sections 3-5 and 7-9); The Mass Strike, the Political Party and the Trade Unions [1906] (sections 4 and 6-8); "The Socialisation of Society" [1918].

https://www.marxists.org/archive/luxemburg/1900/reform-revolution/index.htm

https://www.marxists.org/archive/luxemburg/1906/mass-strike/index.htm

https://www.marxists.org/archive/luxemburg/1918/12/20.htm

Karl Korsch, "What is Socialization?" [1919].

https://pages.gseis.ucla.edu/faculty/kellner/Korsch.pdf

Antonio Gramsci, Prison Notebooks [1929-35] and other minor writings (excerpts).

Anton Pannekoek, Workers' Councils [1946], Chapters I and 2.

https://libcom.org/library/workers-councils-1-pannekoek

https://libcom.org/library/workers-councils-2-pannekoek

Additional Readings:

Lelio Basso, Rosa Luxemburg: A Reappraisal, London: Deutsch 1975.

Paul Mattick, Anti-Bolshevik Communism, London: Merlin 1978.

[and also by the same author on Karl Korsch: https://www.marxists.org/archive/mattick-paul/1964/korsch.htm and https://www.marxists.org/archive/mattick-paul/1962/korsch.htm]

Marcel van der Linden, Western Marxism and the Soviet Union, Leiden: Brill 2007.

https://libcom.org/files/van_der_linden_western_marxism_and_soviet_union.pdf

Antonio Santucci, Antonio Gramsci, New York: Monthly Review Press 2010.

Week 11 – 31 March: The Frankfurt School

Required Readings:

Selections from the writings of Walter Benjamin, Max Horkheimer, Theodor W. Adorno and other authors (TBA).

Additional Readings

Jay Bernstein (Ed.), The Frankfurt School: Critical Assessments, 6 voll., London: Routledge, 1994.

Week 12 – 7 April: Feminism

Required Readings:

Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex [1949] (excerpts).

Luce Irigaray, Speculum of the Other Woman [1974] (excerpts); and This Sex Which Is Not One [1977] (Chapter 8 "Women on the Market" and excerpts).

Additional Readings:

Nancy Holmstrom, The Socialist Feminist Project: A Contemporary Reader in Theory and Politics, New York: Monthly Review Press 2002.

Rosemary Hennessy - Chris Ingraham, Materialist Feminism: A Reader in Class, Difference, and Women's Lives, New York: Routledge 1997.

D. Bair, Introduction to Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex, Vintage, 1989.

Z. Eisenstein (ed.), Capitalist Patriarchy and the Case for Socialist Feminism, New York: Monthly Review Press 1979.

Created: Friday, 01 January 2016 19:58
( 0 Votes ) 
Category: Reviews Tags: espanol Written by Marcello Musto

Santiago M. Roggerone, review of De regreso a Marx. Nuevas lecturas y vigencia en el mundo actual, Ideas de Izquierda: Revista de Política y Cultura, 2016.

En un capítulo de Los Simpson, Bart vende su alma a Milhouse por la suma de cinco dólares.Tras gastar el dinero en esponjas con forma de dinosaurios, comienza a arrepentirse de haber efectuado menuda transacción.

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